Tag: medicine

Blog Posts (57)

March 11, 2017

But at least we don’t have socialized medicine

I just read T. R. Teid’s 2009 book The Healing of America. It’s a timely read in light of the bar brawl over health care that’s brewing in the U.S. legislature this week. Of particular interest are his snapshots of the health care systems of the UK, France, Germany, Japan, Taiwan, Canada, and Switzerland, systems about which I held many cherished misconceptions. All of these countries... // Read More »
February 19, 2017

A Conflict of Interest is NOT an Ambiguity

Oregon Senate Bill 494 has been described as a “euthanasia bill” that is “intentionally ambiguous,” and as a piece of legislation that would “allow the starving and dehydrating of patients who suffer from dementia or mental illness.” What has received less press is the composition of the 13-member committee who would be perpetually in charge of advance directive forms in the state, with no oversight by... // Read More »
February 18, 2017

Advance Care Planning and its Detractors

The default mode of our technologically advanced medicine is to use our technology. Nowhere is this more true than close to the end of life. And our technology is really impressive; with it, we can keep chests going up and down and hearts beating for a long, long time. The troubling thing is that there are many people who would rather not have lots of... // Read More »
February 10, 2017

Apologies and Outcomes

What if a study shows that the course of action we know to be right doesn’t “work”? Or that it may even place us at a disadvantage? When bad things happen to patients in the course of medical treatment, doctors traditionally have avoided apologizing or even expressing sympathy to patients, for fear that such expressions would be used against them in malpractice court as an... // Read More »
February 5, 2017

Excuse Me, Doctor, What Exactly Do You Profess?

The late Edmund Pellegrino, M.D., revered medical educator, ethicist, and physician, often made the point that a professional professes something. Merriam-Webster  confirms that the etymology of the word, profession, includes the Latin for “public declaration.” The Hippocratic Oath, probably penned by members of the Pythagorean sect, according to Ludwig Edelstein (see Ancient Medicine: Selected Papers of Ludwig Edelstein. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987), has for... // Read More »
January 20, 2017

Conflicts of Interest in unsuspected places

Patient advocacy organizations — groups such as the American Cancer Society, the American Diabetes Association, the Arthritis Foundation — are non-profit organizations that seek to help patients with a specific disease or disorder by providing services to patients, sponsoring research, influencing government and insurance policy, and promoting and promulgating guidelines that are followed by doctors and patients to diagnose and treat disease. They are sometimes... // Read More »
January 6, 2017

Party politics, people’s lives

As health care financing rises yet again to the top of our national legislative agenda, some fundamental questions ought to be strongly considered. First, and most fundamental: Is some level of healthcare a right, that the government is therefore obligated to protect? Is it better viewed as a common good, like roads and fire protection services, that everybody pays for through taxes and everybody benefits... // Read More »
December 28, 2016

Doctor as Data Entry Drone

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Most people choose to go into the health professions to help others, to make a secure living, and to challenge themselves on a daily basis.…

December 9, 2016

The National Transgender Study is a Start – But More is Needed to Protect the Sexual Health of Transgender Teens

On Thursday, December 9th, the largest survey of transgender people ever conducted was published by The National Center for Transgender Equality. The anonymous online survey had nearly 28,000 participants and found transgender people are twice as likely to live in poverty and three times more likely to be unemployed, according to an article in TIME … More The National Transgender Study is a Start – But More is Needed to Protect the Sexual Health of Transgender Teens
December 7, 2016

TEDxFordhamUniversity: Lesson in Bioethics Given by Golden Girls | Dr. Elizabeth Yuko

As one of the most groundbreaking sitcoms of all time, The Golden Girls introduced a range of bioethical issues on the show regarding medicine, the human body and women’s health. In this TEDx Talk, Dr. Elizabeth Yuko, a Fordham University Center for Ethics Education  fellow and adjunct professor, discusses how influential Golden Girls was, and still is, … More TEDxFordhamUniversity: Lesson in Bioethics Given by Golden Girls | Dr. Elizabeth Yuko

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Published Articles (2)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 8 Issue 10 - Oct 2008

Review of Michael L. Gross. Bioethics and Armed Conflict/Moral Dilemmas of Medicine and War.

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 4 Issue 3 - Sep 2004

Review of Richard B. Miller, Children, Ethics, and Modern Medicine

News (3)

May 29, 2012 10:39 am

In Medicine, Falling for Fake Innovation (New York Times)

THE sleek, four-armed “da Vinci” robot has been called a breakthrough technology for procedures like prostate surgery. “Imagine,” the manufacturer says, “having the benefits of a definitive treatment but with the potential for significantly less pain, a shorter hospital stay, faster return to normal daily activities.” That’s just the kind of impressive-sounding innovation that critics of the health care reform act say will be stifled by the new law, with its emphasis on cost control and the comparative effectiveness of new pills and devices.

May 16, 2012 9:55 am

Tracing the Path of Jewish Medical Pioneers (New York Times)

The note is displayed in an exhibition called “Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter With Modern Medicine, 1860-1960,” on view at Yeshiva University Museum in Manhattan. The exhibition offers a rare look at a topic few patients ever stop to consider: the emergence of European and American Jews as innovators in medicine, despite their status as outsiders frequently scorned by the medical establishment.

May 15, 2012 10:40 am

Unintended Consequence for Dialysis Patients as Drug Rule Changes (New York Times)

A shift last year by the federal government in how it pays for drugs to treat dialysis patients may have had an unintended and potentially dire consequence, according to new research: a significant jump in blood transfusions for patients who now may not be getting enough of the medications. The findings are seen by some experts as a stark illustration of how the government’s reimbursement policies can drive the practice of medicine.