Tag: mental health

Blog Posts (11)

March 10, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: March 10, 2017

Politics White House Slammed by Federal Ethics Chief for Not Disciplining Kellyanne Conway U.S. government’s official ethics watchdog blasted White House for not taking disciplinary action against senior counselor Kellyanne Conway for promoting Ivanka Trump’s products on TV Trump’s Ethics Order Seen as Boost for Shadow Lobbying President Trump’s speech to the joint session of Congress … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: March 10, 2017
June 21, 2016

Its not just mental health studies: Doctors rarely ask adolescent patients about their sexual orientation & LGBT youth are afraid of bias

A recent report underscores the paucity of mental health research relevant to LGBT patients.  According to Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D., Director of the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education this unfortunate situation is not unique to research studies. “In our … Continue reading
June 13, 2016

APHA Ethics Section Interview with Dr. Celia B. Fisher on Conversion Therapy Report

The following is an interview with the American Public Health Association’s Ethics Section with Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia B. Fisher who served as an advisor for a White House panel on conversion therapy. In April … Continue reading
October 21, 2015

Police and Persons with Mental Illness: The Overlooked Frontline Care Providers

<p>My original plan for this blog was to consider whether or not there remained a need for the old “Drunk Tank” way of managing persons who are acutely intoxicated by allowing them to sleep off or wait out their inebriation at the police station before determining whether or not further mental health care was needed, rather than bringing individuals to hospital emergency rooms for supervised sleep and conversation about detox services or psychiatric evaluation. Though the task of caring for acutely intoxicated persons, sometimes folks who are frequently seen in ERs repeatedly, can seem to be an inappropriate use of resources by clinicians we must appreciate that the motivation is often about safety, protection, and the welfare of the patient as well as the public. In the social context of fear and mistrust toward law enforcement following the many egregious cases of police brutality, my focus is a reminder of the ways in which police can, and often do, intervene with persons who have mental illness and addiction in order to protect these vulnerable mentally ill individuals. In no way do I condone the misconduct and violence we have come to hear about too often, but rather will focus on the important ways police can and very often do work with mental health professionals to assist persons in acute crises. </p> <p><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.04px;"><strong>The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a</strong> </span><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.04px;">Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="http://www.amc.edu/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>
February 11, 2015

Improve Health by Returning to Nature

<p class="MsoNormal" style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">It’s a challenging time of year for those of us living in the snowbound regions of North America. Cold temperatures limit outdoor activity to quick spurts broken up by the need to get warm and sunshine can be hard to come by. Ground hogs are disrupted from their morning naps every Feb. 2 to see if warmer days will be welcomed back sooner rather than later. We yearn for the return of leafy trees, green grass, and less slippery walkways. Science has taken an interest in just what we gain from exposure to nature, and it seems there is more to it than simply wishing winter a glad farewell.</span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">  </span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Though we may consider it common sense that people feel better when they get outdoors, breathe fresh air, and spend time in green spaces filled with grass and trees, there is a growing body of literature to back it up.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"></span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">According to the NYS <a href="http://www.dec.ny.gov">Department of Environmental Conservation</a> </span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">spending time in forests makes us healthier.  The noted benefits include: boosts immunity, reduces stress, lowers blood pressure and improves mood, helps with focus and concentration, increases energy, and improves sleep. “Recognizing those benefits, in 1982, the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries even coined a term for it: shinrin-yoku. It means taking in the forest atmosphere or "<a href="http://www.dec.ny.gov">forest bathing</a>," and the ministry encourages people to visit forests to relieve stress and improve health”</span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">. It seems they are onto something important here. Rx: Forest time.</span></p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 19.0400009155273px; font-size: 12px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 19.0400009155273px; font-size: 12px;"> </span></p>
July 16, 2014

Suicide Prevention: There’s an App for That

<p>I have been slow to fully embrace the full potential my smartphone. I have a few apps that I use regularly for entertainment or basic information, like weather updates and maps. It’s convenient. I can entertain myself with games or social networking while I wait in lines or for a child to finish theater rehearsals, basketball/ballet/swimming practices. If I look up, most others waiting in parked cars are doing the same thing, a faint blue glow radiating from somewhere below the steering wheel.  Before we had devices to entertain us, we would more than likely spend the minutes talking, person to person. I tend to think person to person is better, after all a pen and ink letter, sharing coffee at a small café table, or a supportive hug must mean more than emoticon symbols. But maybe these tiny pictures can convey the intended emotion and offer a substitute when the real thing must be delayed or is otherwise not possible. Where is the line at which an electronic emotion, or interpretation of feeling is no longer enough? When I first learned that there were suicide prevention apps, I was aghast. Have we lost so much human connectedness that even acute emotional despair is summarized in a miniature touch screen? How can an app provide the essential emergent interventions to a person in such despair that he or she is contemplating suicide? But if this is where our social focus is anyway, and the first place people search when looking for help, perhaps it is not such a bad idea.</p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>
June 23, 2014

Teen Suicide Attempts Rise as Warning Cuts Medicine Use

[Bloomberg] A widely publicized warning by U.S. regulators a decade ago about risks for teenagers taking antidepressants led to plummeting prescriptions and increased suicide attempts, Harvard University researchers said. As the public took the Food and Drug Administration’s 2004 warning to heart, adolescent attempted suicides increased 21.7 percent and a 31 percent decline in antidepressant […]
June 19, 2014

You Can’t Fix What Ain’t Broke: Combating the Dangers of Reparative Therapy

by Sean Philpott-Jones, Director of the Center for Bioethics and Clinical Leadership Earlier this week, the New York State Assembly overwhelmingly voted to pass a bill that would ban the use of so-called “reparative” or “conversion” therapy – treatments that aim to change sexual orientation – on minors. During the time I wrote this commentary, the […]
June 19, 2014

You Can’t Fix What Ain’t Broke: Combating the Dangers of Reparative Therapy

by Sean Philpott-Jones, Director of the Center for Bioethics and Clinical Leadership Earlier this week, the New York State Assembly overwhelmingly voted to pass a bill that would ban the use of so-called “reparative” or “conversion” therapy – treatments that aim to change sexual orientation – on minors. During the time I wrote this commentary, the […]
April 15, 2014

Concussion Cases Inspire New Course at George Washington’s Law School

[The New York Times] The revelations that hits to the head may lead to long-term brain damage have rocked the football world at all levels, alarming coaches, players and their parents and forcing the N.F.L. and the N.C.A.A. to tighten safety standards. Given the consequences of the injuries, lawyers, too, have taken note, including those […]

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Published Articles (3)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 10 Issue 11 - Nov 2010

Review of Jonathan Metzl, The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 8 Issue 10 - Oct 2008

The Ethical Elephant in the Death Penalty Room

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 8 Issue 10 - Oct 2008

Response to Open Peer Commentaries on The Ethical Elephant in the Death Penalty Room

News (7)

April 22, 2013 12:58 pm

Study: Green Space Means More for Satisfaction Than a Neighborhood's Average Income

How strongly people’s mental health and life satisfaction correlated with their proximities to parks and gardens.

December 19, 2012 6:03 pm

Medical examiner seeks genetic clues to Connecticut school gunman as funerals continue (Fox News)

Connecticut’s chief medical examiner will seek genetic clues in hopes of explaining why a gunman killed 20 children and six adults in a Newtown elementary school as funerals and memorial services for the victims continue throughout the state on Wednesday.

December 17, 2012 6:26 pm

Guns, Mental Illness and Newtown (Wall Street Journal)

People who are serious about preventing the next Newtown should embrace much greater funding for mental health, strong laws for civil commitment of the violently mentally illl—and stop kidding themselves that pretend gun-free zones will stop killers.

December 17, 2012 6:11 pm

Mental health care in U.S. questioned amid another tragedy (CBS News)

More needs to be done to improve mental health care in the US amid an increase in tragedies in recent years. The issue was addressed this weekend in a now viral blog by a concerned parent called “I Am Adam Lanza’s Mother.” where she detailed the struggles she has with her 13-year-old son whom she calls “mentally ill.”

October 25, 2012 4:50 pm

Genes, Depression and Life Satisfaction (Science Codex)

This is the main finding of a new twin study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in collaboration with the University of Oslo. The researchers compared longitudinal information from identical and fraternal twins to determine how vulnerability to major depression is associated with dispositional (overall) lifetime satisfaction.

 

June 19, 2012 11:49 am

Experts cast doubt on Sandusky's disorder defense (SF Gate)

The defense in Jerry Sandusky’s child sexual abuse trial is suggesting that a personality disorder explains some of the charges against the former Penn State assistant football coach, but one expert says that may be a stretch.

June 18, 2012 6:51 pm

'Shocking discrimination' in mental health services (BBC News)

The Mental Health Policy Group from the London School of Economics said three-quarters of people with depression or anxiety got no treatment. The committee of senior academics and medical professionals described this as a “real scandal”. Care Services Minister Paul Burstow said mental health should be treated as seriously as physical health issues.