Tag: neuroscience

Blog Posts (83)

May 19, 2015

New Educational Module from the Bioethics Commission on Informed Consent in Neuroscience Now Available

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has posted to Bioethics.gov a new educational module on informed consent. The module accompanies the Bioethics Commission’s two-volume report Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 1) and Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society […]
May 13, 2015

Bioethics Commission recommends establishing clear requirements for identifying legally authorized representatives for research participation

On March 26 the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) released the second volume of its two-volume report on neuroscience and ethics, Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 2). In Gray Matters, Vol. 2, the Bioethics Commission recognized the challenging tension between the […]
May 12, 2015

New Education Materials from the Bioethics Commission on Research Design Now Available

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has posted to Bioethics.gov a new series of educational modules on research design. The materials on research design increase the breadth of topics covered by the Bioethics Commission’s educational resources. Previous topics include privacy, community engagement, compensation for research-related injury, informed consent, and vulnerable […]
May 5, 2015

Bioethics Commission Recommends Engaging Stakeholders to Address Stigma Associated with Impaired Consent Capacity

In Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 2), the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) explored capacity and the consent process as one of three topics that illustrate some of the ethical and societal tensions that surround rapidly advancing neuroscience research and its […]
April 29, 2015

Bioethics Commission Recommends Further Research on Consent Capacity and Ethical Protections for Participants

In Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) provided ethical analysis of three topics, including consent capacity and neuroscience research. More than one billion people globally, including millions of people in the United States, are affected by neurological disorders.[1] Neuroscience […]
April 22, 2015

Bioethics Commission recommends the responsible inclusion of participants with impaired consent capacity in neuroscience research

On March 26 the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) released the second volume of its two-volume report on neuroscience and ethics, Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 2). In Gray Matters, Vol. 2, the Bioethics Commission recognized the challenging tension between the […]
April 15, 2015

Bioethics Commission Recommends Creating Guidance About Use of Neural Modifiers to Augment or Enhance Neural Function

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) recently released Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 2). This is the second volume in its two-part response to President Obama’s July 2013 Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative-related charge to “identify proactively a […]
April 9, 2015

Bioethics Commission Makes Recommendation on Equitable Access to Safe and Effective Neural Modifiers

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) recently released Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society. In this report the Bioethics Commission considered in depth ethical concerns raised by the development and use of novel forms of neural modification, including those designed to enhance cognition. The Bioethics […]
April 2, 2015

Two years of Neuroscience Inquiry at the Bioethics Commission

On March 26, 2015, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) released Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 2), the second of its two-volume  response to President Obama’s charge to examine the ethical implications of neuroscience research and its applications. To commemorate the […]
April 1, 2015

Bioethics Commission Makes Recommendations on Existing and Novel Methods to Maintain and Improve Neural Health

In its recently published report, Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 2), the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) focused on three controversial topics that illustrate some of the ethical and societal tensions that surround rapidly advancing neuroscience research and its applications. One […]

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Published Articles (51)

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 1 Issue 1 - Jan 2010

Disbelief and Self-Deception in Conversion Disorder Richard A. Kanaan

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 1 Issue 1 - Jan 2010

Review of Martin Lindstrom, Buyology Dawn N. Albertson

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 1 Issue 1 - Jan 2010

Review of Nancey Murphy and Warren S. Brown, Did My Neurons Make Me Do It?: Philosophical and Neurobiological Perspectives on Moral Responsibility and Free Will Teneille Brown

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 1 Issue 1 - Jan 2010

Hysteria and the Varieties of Deception Richard A. Kanaan

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 1 Issue 1 - Jan 2010

Negotiating the Relationship Between Addiction, Ethics, and Brain Science Daniel Z. Buchman, Wayne Skinner & Judy Illes

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 1 Issue 1 - Jan 2010

Neuroenhancement in Young People: Proposal for Research, Policy, and Clinical Management Ilina Singh & Kelly J. Kelleher

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 1 Issue 1 - Jan 2010

Welcome to the New, Independent, AJOB Neuroscience Paul Root Wolpe

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 1 Issue 2 - Apr 2010

Neuroconcerns: Some Responses to My Critics Jonathan H. Marks

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 1 Issue 2 - Apr 2010

Review of James Cameron's Avatar Paul Root Wolpe

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 1 Issue 2 - Apr 2010

Paul Root Wolpe Interviewing John Moreno

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News (15)

August 12, 2013 3:34 pm

Near death experiences could be surge in electrical activity

Near death experiences in which people report “seeing the light” could be explained by increases in electrical activity in the brain after the heart stops, scientists have found.

June 21, 2013 4:40 pm

Whole human brain mapped in 3D

An international group of neuroscientists has sliced, imaged and analysed the brain of a 65-year-old woman to create the most detailed map yet of a human brain in its entirety.

February 15, 2013 11:56 am

Neurostimulation Has Benefits in Early Parkinson's Disease (Medscape Today)

Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS) offers benefits earlier in the course of Parkinson’s disease (PD), before the appearance of severe disabling motor complications, according to results of a randomized controlled trial.

October 29, 2012 4:55 pm

Buddhist Monk is the World's Happiest Man (New York Daily News)

Tibetan monk and molecular geneticist Matthieu Ricard is the happiest man in the world according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin. The 66-year-old’s brain produces a level of gamma waves – those linked to consciousness, attention, learning and memory – never before reported in neuroscience.

September 13, 2012 1:31 pm

Neuro-Pretensions: Attacking the Science of Pop Neuroscience (Reason (blog))

Steven Poole in the New Statesman has a fun and feisty attack–very appropriate in the memory of Thomas Szasz, one of the great warriors against the scientistic pretensions of our knowledge of the human mind–on pop neuroscience books, for grossly overstating the value of fMRI evidence, burying truistic speculation under the guise of cutting-edge science, and sheer hand-waving silliness, among other intellectual crimes.

July 5, 2012 1:10 pm

Controversial science of brain imaging (Scientific American)

Researchers have been struggling to unfold ‘what’s under the hood’ through the lens of neuroscience and they have been finding all sorts of insights into human behavior. They have been looking at everything from how multitasking is harder for seniors to how people love talking about themselves. Neural basis of love and hatred, compassion and admiration have all been studied with fMRI, yielding colored blobs representing the corresponding love or hatred centers in our brains. But what does it all really mean?

May 17, 2012 9:54 am

“The Self” in the Future: Will it be Extinguished, by Neuroscience? (Institute for Emerging Ethics & Technologies)

Will “the self” survive because it can provide people with a greater sense of happiness? Or is it – perhaps along with the constructs “Free Will” and “Determinism” – doomed to the dustbin of history? Should cyborgs, avatars, and a rewired human brain be developed with a stronger or weaker sense of self? An interview with Dr. Garret Merriam, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at University of Southern Indiana.

May 10, 2012 11:30 am

Neurononsense: Why brain sciences can't explain the human condition (ABC News)

The new sciences in fact have a tendency to divide neatly into two parts. On the one hand there is an analysis of some feature of our mental or social life and an attempt to show its importance and the principles of its organisation. On the other hand, there is a set of brain scans. Every now and then there is a cry of “Eureka!” – for example, when Joshua Greene showed that dilemmas involving personal confrontation arouse different brain areas from those aroused by detached moral calculations. But since Greene gave no coherent description of the question, to which the datum was supposed to suggest an answer, the cry dwindled into silence.

April 12, 2012 11:44 pm

Awake or Knocked Out? The Line Gets Blurrier (New York Times)

The puzzle of consciousness is so devilish that scientists and philosophers are still struggling with how to talk about it, let alone figure out what it is and where it comes from.

April 11, 2012 1:13 pm

Advancing Health and Robotics (US News)

Center researchers are studying neural systems and their relationship to motor commands, a connection that potentially could benefit the aging, those suffering from neurological disorders, or who have lost limbs in battle or other trauma, or from diseases. . . They also are studying important related emotional, cultural, ethical and psychological issues associated with limb loss, and enlisting the input of experts, for example, Judy Illes, a neurology professor at the University of British Columbia, who specializes in neuroethics.

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