Tag: pain

Blog Posts (3)

February 1, 2013

Protecting Us from Pain Control

Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week, an FDA advisory panel suggested that hydrocodone-based pain control medications be reclassified from Schedule III to Schedule II.…

May 14, 2012

AJOB: An Independent Journal

It has been implied by Carl Elliott and William Heisel that it has ever been claimed that “financial links between the Center for Practical Bioethics, AJOB and Purdue Pharma” exist and that “what reporters may find is that the center is tied up” with AJOB.  …

April 10, 2012

Caplan on Prescription Drug Abuse

Today Art Caplan, in his MSNBC column, discusses the epidemic of prescription drug abuse in this country. But his conclusions would have a chilling effect upon physicians.  …

Published Articles (4)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 10 Issue 11 - Nov 2010

Be Careful How You Help

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 10 Issue 11 - Nov 2010

Pain Treatment Agreements

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 9 Issue 12 - Dec 2009

Response to Open Peer Commentaries on ?A Duty to Deceive: Placebos in Clinical Practice?

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 9 Issue 12 - Dec 2009

A Duty to Deceive: Placebos in Clinical Practice

News (2)

July 10, 2012 4:28 pm

FDA unveils safety measures for opioid painkillers (Fox News)

Drugmakers that market powerful painkiller medications will be required to fund training programs to help U.S. doctors and other health professionals safely prescribe the drugs, which are blamed for thousands of fatal overdoses each year.  The safety plan released by the Food and Drug Administration on Monday is designed to reduce misuse and abuse of long-acting opioid pain relievers, which include forms of morphine, methadone and oxycodone. The agency’s plan mainly involves educating doctors and patients about appropriate use of the drugs.

June 1, 2012 8:46 am

Doctor Shopping: States Cracking Down On Prescription Drug Abuse (Huffington Post)

When a new patient comes into Dr. Shawn Jones’ office in Paducah, Kentucky complaining of pain and asks for a specific drug without talking about other symptoms, Jones gets suspicious. “The first thing they say is they’re in horrible pain and they need pain medicine,” said Jones. “The other thing that gives it away is they want to tell you what works – they tell you they want Percocet. They don’t talk about their symptoms – they don’t say, ‘Oh, two weeks ago I hurt my back.'” These are the types of red flags that can send Kentucky doctors to check a state database to see if a patient is “doctor shopping” for addictive painkillers.