Tag: personalized medicine

Blog Posts (4)

September 14, 2009

Something to Say about Personal Genomics? Here's Your Chance.

Hat tip to the Business Ethics blog for letting us know about a new research study on personal genomics, privacy and consent currently underway being conducted online from researchers at at University of British Columbia, Saint Mary’s University, & Ryerson University.…

December 2, 2008

Is the Era of Personalized Medicine (Almost) Really Here?

In the last week, I’ve read two news items that have resulted in my asking the question, “Is the era of personalized medicine really here?…

November 5, 2008

Consider the Source

The American College of Preventive Medicine has announced via MarketWatch that it will be producing a new CME program to help physicians understand genetic information in the coming era of personalized medicine.…

October 20, 2008

Letting the Genome Loose? No Biggie.

Announced today in the NYT, Harvard Medical School unveiled the first 10 participants in their Personal Genome Project.


Ranging from entrepreneurs to academics to healthcare execs, the goal of the project is to raise awareness about the possibility of personal genomes for everyone.…

News (2)

December 13, 2012 5:42 pm

Personalized Cancer Medicine: Drugs Based On Genetics Alone Will Never Be True Cure (Huffington Post)

Despite variation in cell behavior, cancer cell “clones” all had identical genomes, supposedly the all-powerful determinant of how cancer cells behave. This finding underlines that a tumor’s behavior depends on something other than its DNA.

July 27, 2012 5:53 pm

Is personalized medicine a myth? (CNN)

Personalized medicine can deliver better information to help patients make an individual choice about the risks and rewards of a particular course of treatment: which medicines will work for him or her, which drugs may pose a danger and whether doses may need to be adjusted. Personalized medicine can also help profile someone’s potential risk for contracting a disease like cancer or diabetes.  But not everyone agrees with Topol.  “Personalized medicine is a myth. It’s hyperbolic,” argued Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, vice provost for global initiatives and chairman of the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania.