Tag: professionalism

Blog Posts (15)

April 8, 2015

Is a gift of ribs “slightly unethical” in the physician-patient relationship?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In an editorial in the Chicago Tribune, a physician tells the story of an underserved patient who owned a rib joint.…

March 17, 2015

Good Ethics Requires Bad News

Some bad news took me by surprise this week, taking the form of an article in the Annals of Family Medicine entitled, “Why Medical Schools Are Tolerant of Unethical Behavior.”  The authors described a medical school graduation ceremony in which the speaker thanked professors and healthcare professionals not just for competent and humane care, but for providing examples of “pure unethical behavior.” I wondered if... // Read More »
February 24, 2015

Speaking about dignity

Several years ago, while on the verge of delivering the baby of a seventeen year old, I was taken aback by the number of friends that she had asked to accompany her at the event…an event formerly considered far more private than one in which fifteen or so friends might attend (it was a large delivery room). And speaking of private, the wording and location... // Read More »
February 10, 2015

“Grace” as a principle for the medical profession

The other day I was speaking to another physician about grace. This was at church, not surprisingly, but later I wondered why such discussions don’t occur in the hospital. When I recall the more remarkable physician-patient encounters I have seen, the word that comes to mind as the common theme is grace. We can see it in the physician calmly and pleasantly treating the irascible... // Read More »
January 27, 2015

Academic Medicine: In need of an examination?

Being a physician in an academic setting, my attention was drawn to this recent article in Academic Medicine: “Time Well Spent: The Association Between Time and Effort Allocation and Intent to Leave Among Clinical Faculty” by Pollart et al. I had mixed gut reactions to this topic; ranging from the notion that this is an awesome topic long overdue for attention, to the questioning of... // Read More »
January 5, 2015

“How Are You Diverse?:” How the Academic Job Market Aggravated my Racial Insecurities

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Last year on the academic job market I had 59 interviews (skype and telephone interviews). That means that 59 times I had to fit a 30-60 minute interview into my insanely busy adjunct teaching schedule.…

September 30, 2014

An Ethics of Complexity

As a long-time member of the military medical community, this article caught my eye: “1 in 5 Army hospital leaders suspended in 2 years: What’s behind the discipline?” The reasons for these suspensions are known only at the highest level of command, and I suspect that there they will remain. But such a circumstance is significant, and we must ask for the reasons, to determine... // Read More »
August 5, 2014

The Ethics of Physician Drug Test: Why It’s a Bad Idea

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Pilots do it. Train conductors, air traffic controllers, TSA agents, police offices, fire fighters, Olympic athletes and long haul truckers do it.…

May 1, 2014

Lessons for the Future of Primary Care from Robin Cook’s Cell

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

I just finished reading the popular fiction novel Cell by Robin Cook. This medical thriller revolves around George Wilson, a radiology resident who finds people dying suddenly after receiving diagnoses of terminal illnesses including his fiancé and next-door-neighbor.…

April 29, 2014

Defending Bioethics in the Job Market

By Keisha Ray, PhD

I am a junior scholar who is currently on the job market, hoping to secure a faculty position as a bioethicist.…

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Published Articles (3)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 6 Issue 2 - Mar 2006

A Defense of Unqualified Medical Confidentiality

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 4 Issue 2 - Jun 2004

The Professionalism Movement: Can We Pause?

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 4 Issue 3 - Sep 2004

Charles Barkley's Dilemma: A Response to ?The Professionalism Movement: Can We Pause?? by Delese Wear and Mark G. Kuczewski (AJOB 4:2)

News (1)

July 11, 2012 6:50 pm

Professionalism: Social media mishaps (CMAJ)

One of the primary reasons medical professionalism is lagging online is that the doctors who use social media the most are from a different generation than those who know the most about maintaining the reputation of the profession. “People who have a blog or are on Twitter and Facebook tend to be on the younger side. People with more wisdom about professional boundary issues tend to be on the older side. There is a bit of a gap there and a lack of training and mentorship in this area,” says Dr. David Brendel, a psychiatrist practising in the area of Boston, Massachusetts, and a sought-after educator on matters of medical ethics and professionalism (drdavidbrendel.com).