Tag: professionalism

Blog Posts (21)

August 24, 2015

Seeing the Horror

A video released by The Center for Medical Progress (CMP)  about Planned Parenthood included these words: “Some viewers may find this content disturbing.” It was to warn the viewer about the images of piled fetal body parts dumped from a bag by an abortion clinic worker. What might be most disturbing…and chilling…is not the body parts, but the casual and glib attitudes of the Planned Parenthood... // Read More »
July 29, 2015

Cecil the Lion: Can Health Care Professionals Ethically Be Sport Hunters

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In James Patterson’s book (and now TV miniseries) Zoo, the animals have acquired an intelligence that removes their fear of humans.…

July 13, 2015

The Physician’s Imprimatur

In a previous blog response about physician-assisted suicide (PAS), Mark McQuain asked, “Why involve physicians at all?” That question gets too little attention. There are some easily discernible (and perhaps expressed) reasons why physicians are chosen to be the agents of assisting suicide. First, they have access to pain- or consciousness-relieving pharmacologic measures that also have the (in this case) desirable effect of stopping breathing... // Read More »
July 7, 2015

A Doctor Lied & Patients Suffered

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

When I was graduating from college, I had a friend who was diagnosed with cancer. At least, that’s what she told her friends.…

June 30, 2015

Professionalism in Medicine: I Know it When I See it

by Jennifer Chevinsky, BS

A medical student comes into the hospital wearing his favorite pair of old, ripped, dirty jeans.

A physician ‘pimps’ a medical student and publicly shames her when she doesn’t know the answer.…

April 29, 2015

Why Doctors Should Audio Record Patient Encounters

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In Dave Eggers’ novel, The Circle, a behemoth tech company makes it popular for people to wear cameras and to live broadcast every minute of their lives (except for time in the bathroom).…

April 8, 2015

Is a gift of ribs “slightly unethical” in the physician-patient relationship?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In an editorial in the Chicago Tribune, a physician tells the story of an underserved patient who owned a rib joint.…

March 17, 2015

Good Ethics Requires Bad News

Some bad news took me by surprise this week, taking the form of an article in the Annals of Family Medicine entitled, “Why Medical Schools Are Tolerant of Unethical Behavior.”  The authors described a medical school graduation ceremony in which the speaker thanked professors and healthcare professionals not just for competent and humane care, but for providing examples of “pure unethical behavior.” I wondered if... // Read More »
February 24, 2015

Speaking about dignity

Several years ago, while on the verge of delivering the baby of a seventeen year old, I was taken aback by the number of friends that she had asked to accompany her at the event…an event formerly considered far more private than one in which fifteen or so friends might attend (it was a large delivery room). And speaking of private, the wording and location... // Read More »
February 10, 2015

“Grace” as a principle for the medical profession

The other day I was speaking to another physician about grace. This was at church, not surprisingly, but later I wondered why such discussions don’t occur in the hospital. When I recall the more remarkable physician-patient encounters I have seen, the word that comes to mind as the common theme is grace. We can see it in the physician calmly and pleasantly treating the irascible... // Read More »

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Published Articles (3)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 6 Issue 2 - Mar 2006

A Defense of Unqualified Medical Confidentiality

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 4 Issue 2 - Jun 2004

The Professionalism Movement: Can We Pause?

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 4 Issue 3 - Sep 2004

Charles Barkley's Dilemma: A Response to ?The Professionalism Movement: Can We Pause?? by Delese Wear and Mark G. Kuczewski (AJOB 4:2)

News (1)

July 11, 2012 6:50 pm

Professionalism: Social media mishaps (CMAJ)

One of the primary reasons medical professionalism is lagging online is that the doctors who use social media the most are from a different generation than those who know the most about maintaining the reputation of the profession. “People who have a blog or are on Twitter and Facebook tend to be on the younger side. People with more wisdom about professional boundary issues tend to be on the older side. There is a bit of a gap there and a lack of training and mentorship in this area,” says Dr. David Brendel, a psychiatrist practising in the area of Boston, Massachusetts, and a sought-after educator on matters of medical ethics and professionalism (drdavidbrendel.com).