Tag: public health

Blog Posts (53)

November 7, 2014

Kaci Hickox: Public health and the politics of fear

Steven H Miles, M.D.

Kaci Hickox is a nurse who went to Sierra Leone with Doctors without borders to treat the emergency with Ebola.…

January 17, 2013

Twenty-Three-Year-Old Female

Jennifer Chevinsky, B.S.

On December 16th, a 23 year-old female physiotherapy student was raped by six men on a private bus in New Delhi, India, while returning home from a movie theater.

January 15, 2013

The Moral Failure of HPV Vaccination

Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

Among the greatest failures in American public health—and the list is a long one—is the rise in the incidence of cervical cancer.  …

June 5, 2012

CDC Creates National Plan for Infertility. Comments?

Today the CDC’s Division on Reproductive Health announced a draft version of a white paper entitled “A National Public Health Action Plan for the Detection, Prevention, and Management of Infertility” is now available for comment.…

May 31, 2012

Bloomberg and the Big Bad Soda Ban

Every few years in states like New York and California some state official has “had it up to here” with the obesity epidemic.…

May 17, 2012

Caplan: Problems with At Home HIV Testing

Ultimately, at home HIV testing could be an important piece of HIV prevention and treatment. But there are important concerns about ethical gaps in at home testing for HIV says Arthur Caplan in his post on MSNBC.…

March 28, 2012

Dukan Diet Doctor Proposal May Be Extreme, But Isn't Entirely Wrong

A controversial diet guru in France, Dr. Pierre Dukan, has raised a lot of eyebrows and ire for proposing that all high-school students in France, in order to graduate, pass a weight exam.…

March 15, 2012

The March Issue of AJOB is Now Online

The American Journal of Bioethics is proud to announce that its March issue, a special issue discussing issues related to lying in medicine, is now available online.…

November 29, 2011

Why Fat Cannot Make You Unfit to Parent

An eight-year-old Cleveland Heights, Ohio boy has been taken away from his parents by Child Protective Services. An unfortunate, but routine occurrence in the world of CPS–but this time the case has an usual cause—this third grader weighs more than 200 pounds and in the judgement of some Cuyahoga County officials his parents are the cause of his abuse to his health and well-being.…

October 20, 2011

Food Fight: Industry versus the IOM

If we are what we eat, shouldn’t we know what we are, in fact, eating? This simple idea may be much harder to support than one would guess thanks to lobbying on the part of the food industry, says Arthur Caplan in his MSNBC column today.…

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Published Articles (8)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 3 - Mar 2015

Mandatory Cancer Risk Warnings on Alcoholic Beverages: What Are the Ethical Issues? Jennie Louise, Jaklin Eliott, Ian Olver & Annette Braunack-Ma

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 3 - Mar 2014

The Ethics of Advertising for Health Care Services Yael Schenker, Robert M. Arnold & Alex John London

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 3 - Mar 2014

Ethics and Empiricism in the Formation of Professional Guidelines Mildred K. Cho

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

The Use of Deception in Public Health Behavioral Intervention Trials: A Case Study of Three Online Alcohol Trials Jim McCambridge, Kypros Kypri, Preben Bendtsen & John Porter

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 9 - Sep 2013

An Ethical Analysis of Mandatory Influenza Vaccination of Health Care Personnel: Implementing Fairly and Balancing Benefits and Burdens Armand H. Matheny Antommaria

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 9 - Sep 2013

Ethics of Clinical Science in a Public Health Emergency: Drug Discovery at the Bedside Sarah J. L. Edwards

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 9 - Sep 2013

Vaccine Mandates Are Justifiable Because We Are All in This Together John D. Lantos and Mary Anne Jackson

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 12 Issue 9 - Sep 2012

Can Medical Repatriation Be Ethical? Establishing Best Practices Mark Kuczewskia

News (193)

March 24, 2015 1:50 pm

Parental smoking increases risk of future heart disease for kids

The new study, published in Circulation, adds to the growing evidence demonstrating that parents smoking can have a long-term effect on their children’s cardiovascular health.

March 23, 2015 7:40 pm

Worldwide Use Of Antibiotics In Livestock Is Fueling Risk Of Drug-Resistant Super Bugs Reuters Posted: 23/03/2015 05:31 IST Updated: 5 hours ago LIVESTOCK Share 19 Tweet 33 Comment 2 By Chris Arsenault ROME, March 23 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Developing countries are pumping livestock full of antibiotics at such a startling rate that they are dramatically increasing the risk of creating drug-resistant "super bugs," scientists warned on Monday. Antibiotic use in animals is expected to surge by two thirds globally between 2010 and 2030, while doubling in emerging giants like China, Brazil, India and Russia, according to a Princeton University study. It warned that the practice is pushing us closer to a time when common infections could become a death sentence because they will no longer respond to drugs. Consumption of meat, milk and eggs is growing fast in many developing and middle-income countries. Urbanization, increased wealth and changing diets mean industrial livestock producers are expanding rapidly. They are relying on antibiotics to keep disease at bay in the short-term, said co-author Tim Robinson, a scientist with the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI). But the systematic use of low doses on livestock is creating "perfect conditions to grow resistant bacteria," he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. Bacteria like E. coli and salmonella are already becoming resistant to antibiotics, Robinson said, increasing fears that these diseases will endanger humans. Passed from animals to people through food contamination, direct contact or the broader environment, antibiotic resistant bacteria will make it harder for doctors to treat basic infections or other ailments, he said. The study by experts from Princeton, ILRI and the National Institutes of Health is the first to measure global antibiotic consumption by livestock. Asia is the main region of concern as this is where demand for livestock products is growing dramatically while regulations governing antibiotic use in animals are either non-existent or not publicly available, scientists say. China's livestock industry alone could soon be consuming nearly one third of the world's antibiotics. The five countries with the largest projected increases in antibiotics consumption are Myanmar (205 percent), Nigeria (163 percent), Peru (160 percent) and Vietnam (157 percent). Increasing food production for the estimated 805 million people who go to bed hungry every night will require a new approach that is less reliant on intensive, antiobiotic-fueled breeding, Robinson said. "Poor livestock producers aren't responsible for this problem, it's the big firms rushing to meet demand in the growing cities," he added. But the poor will be worst affected if resistant bacteria transfer to humans more often, he said, because they will be the least able to afford the bigger and more frequent doses of drugs required to fight infections. (Reporting By Chris Arsenault, Editing by Emma Batha) Also on HuffPost: Close  Meat-Free Protein 1 of 10   Flickr: little blue hen Lentils Greek Yogurt Beans Tofu Tempeh Spinach Quinoa Peanuts Related Video Next Previous Next More: Reuters Super Bug Antibiotic Resistant Super Bug Antibiotics in Livestock Antibiotics in Animal Agriculture Suggest a correction Around the Web Stop the Spread of Superbugs - NIH News in Health, February 2014 Superbug: An Epidemic Begins - Harvard Magazine Antibiotic resistance - Wikipedia Skyrocketing use of antibiotics in animals fuels 'super bug' fears Chlorine in Water Treatment May Be Breeding Drug-Resistant 'Superbugs' Antibiotic Resistance In Pets Linked To Superbug Rise, Experts Blame Overuse ...

Developing countries are pumping livestock full of antibiotics at such a startling rate that they are dramatically increasing the risk of creating drug-resistant “super bugs,” scientists warned on Monday.

March 19, 2015 3:59 pm

Ban on fast-food eateries in South L.A. hasn't cut obesity, study says

A 2008 ban on new fast-food restaurants in South L.A. has failed to cut the obesity rate, a Rand study says

March 19, 2015 1:44 pm

Industry makes $7,000 for each tobacco death: health campaigners

The tobacco industry makes $7,000 for each of the more than 6 million people who die each year from smoking-related illness, the health campaign group World Lung Foundation (WLF) said.

March 17, 2015 2:00 pm

Half a million babies die each year in unhygienic hospitals

Over a third of hospitals and clinics in developing countries have nowhere for staff or patients to wash with soap, and almost 40 percent have no source of water, according to a WHO-backed international review published on Tuesday.

March 3, 2015 2:39 pm

Irish parliament passes plain tobacco packaging law

Ireland on Tuesday became the second country in the world to pass legislation requiring cigarettes to be sold in plain packets, despite threats of legal action by tobacco companies opposed to the move.

March 2, 2015 2:23 pm

Study links common food additives to Crohn's disease, colitis

Common additives in ice cream, margarine, packaged bread and many processed foods may promote the inflammatory bowel diseases ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease as well as a group of obesity-related conditions, scientists said on Wednesday.

February 17, 2015 2:53 pm

Plain tobacco packs likely to deter smoking, studies show

Studies on the health impact of “plain” or standardized cigarette packs suggest they can deter non-smokers from taking up the habit and may cut the number of cigarettes smokers get through, scientists said on Tuesday.

February 12, 2015 4:31 pm

HPV vaccine linked to less-risky behavior

Contrary to concerns that getting vaccinated against human papilloma virus (HPV) will lead young people to have more or riskier sex, a new study in England finds less risky behavior among young women who got the HPV vaccine.

February 11, 2015 4:26 pm

Teacher depression may affect child learning

The more depressive symptoms third grade teachers had in a new study, the less progress in math their struggling students made during the school year.

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