Tag: research ethics

Blog Posts (43)

June 15, 2015

Welcoming the Concept of Alief to Medical Ethics

Welcoming the Concept of Alief to Medical Ethics

 by J.S. Blumenthal-Barby, Ph.D.

Philosopher Tamar Gendler has introduced (circa 2008) a new concept in the philosophical literature that could be of interest to medical ethicists.…

April 19, 2013

John Lantos, MD weighs in on the SUPPORT study

David Magnus, Ph.D.

John Lantos, MD weighs in on the SUPPORT study. He points out that the work of self-appointed “watch-dogs” such as Public Citizen and the Alliance for Human Research Protection are a danger to bioethics.…

April 18, 2013

NEJM Responses to the support controversy

David Magnus, Ph.D.

The New England Journal of Medicine ‘s web site has the early publication of an editorial about the controversy over the SUPPORT study of oxygen saturation levels in premature infants.…

April 4, 2013

Check out the April 2013 issue of AJOB!

DOES CONSENT BIAS RESEARCH? 

SICKLE CELL AND THE “DIFFICULT PATIENT” CONUNDRUM

February 19, 2013

"Innovative Treatment" vs Research: Which Is It?

Maurice Bernstein, M.D.

When does a doctor’s treatment of a patient become medical or surgical research? If what the doctor does is a standard and accepted method of therapy using proven medications or surgical techniques and represents nothing novel then at first glance what is occurring cannot be designated as research or can it?

December 14, 2012

Operation Delirium

Craig M. Klugman, Ph.D.

Joining the long line of examples of concerning human subjects research experiments is a profile in The New Yorker (December 17).…

September 1, 2012

AJOB's September Issue is Here!

This month’s issue features:

 …

February 10, 2012

Is Hope a Culprit in Cancer Clinical Trials?

A recent study conducted by Emory University School of Medicine found that therapeutic misconception is alive and well in Phase I cancer research.…

November 3, 2011

November Issue of AJOB is Now Available Online!

This month’s issue of The American Journal of Bioethics is now available online. Research ethics is featured prominently in this issue with Rosamond Rhodes et al arguing for a new category of research risk and an article about the recruitment of research participants.…

October 4, 2011

A Duty to Report Dead Ends?

When an investigational agent is being studied by pharma, is there an ethical responsibility to disclose the findings of that research, even if the agent is no longer being studied or being brought to market?…

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Published Articles (47)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 3 - Mar 2017

Using Social Media as a Research Recruitment Tool: Ethical Issues and Recommendations Luke Gelinas, Robin Pierce, Sabune Winkler, I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch & Barbara E. Bierer

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 3 - Mar 2017

Studying “Friends”: The Ethics of Using Social Media as Research Platforms Sandra Soo-Jin Lee

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

When are primary care physicians untruthful with patients? A qualitative study Stephanie R. Morain, Lisa I. Iezzoni, Michelle M. Mello, Elyse R. Park, Joshua P. Metlay, Gabrielle Horner & Eric G. Campbell

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

How are PCORI-funded researchers engaging patients in research and what are the ethical implications? Lauren E. Ellis MA, PhD & Nancy E. Kass

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 10 - Oct 2016

Healing Without Waging War: Beyond Military Metaphors in Medicine and HIV Cure Research Jing-Bao Nie, Adam Gilbertson, Malcolm de Roubaix, Ciara Staunton, Anton van Niekerk, Joseph D. Tucker & Stuart Rennie

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 9 - Sep 2015

Patient Perspectives on the Learning Health System: The Importance of Trust and Shared Decision Making Maureen Kelley, Cyan James, Stephanie Alessi Kraft, Diane Korngiebel, Isabelle Wijangco, Emily Rosenthal, Steven Joffe, Mildred K. Cho, Benjamin Wilfond & Sandra Soo-Jin Lee

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 9 - Sep 2015

Prudentia Populo: Involving the Community in Biobank Governance Megan A. Allyse, Jennifer B. McCormick & Richard R. Sharp

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 4 - Apr 2015

Examining the Ethics of Clinical Use of Unproven Interventions Outside of Clinical Trials During the Ebola Epidemic Seema K. Shah, David Wendler & Marion Danis

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 4 - Apr 2015

Selecting the Right Tool For the Job Arthur L. Caplan, Carolyn Plunkett & Bruce Levin

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 3 - Mar 2015

The Social Determinants of Health: Why Should We Care? Adina Preda & Kristin Voigt

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News (133)

March 24, 2017 9:00 am

World’s first full-body PET scanner could aid drug development, monitor environmental toxins (Science)

Researchers are working to build the world’s first full-body PET scanner, which they claim will increase our power to understand what’s going on in our bodies through more vivid PET images and the opportunity to examine how the whole body responds to drugs and toxins.

March 14, 2017 9:00 am

Scientists Closer To Creating A Fully Synthetic Yeast Genome (NPR)

Scientists have taken another important step toward creating different types of synthetic life in the laboratory. An international research consortium reports Thursday that it has figured out an efficient method for synthesizing a substantial part of the genetic code of yeast.

February 24, 2017 9:00 am

The Birth of CRISPR Inc (Science)

As the science grew even more compelling and venture capital (VC) beckoned, the jockeying to start CRISPR companies became intense. The research community was rent apart by concerns about intellectual property, academic credit, Nobel Prize dreams, geography, media coverage, egos, personal profit, and loyalty. A billion dollars poured into what might be called CRISPR Inc.

February 23, 2017 9:00 am

How Silicon Valley Is Trying to Hack Its Way Into a Longer Life (Time)

Rather than wait years for treatments to be approved by federal officials, many of them are testing ways to modify human biology that fall somewhere on the spectrum between science and entrepreneurialism. It’s called biohacking, and it’s one of the biggest things happening in the Bay Area.

February 22, 2017 6:00 am

Artificial intelligence grows a nose (Science)

Now, 22 teams of computer scientists have unveiled a set of algorithms able to predict the odor of different molecules based on their chemical structure. It remains to be seen how broadly useful such programs will be, but one hope is that such algorithms may help fragrancemakers and food producers design new odorants with precisely tailored scents.

February 21, 2017 9:00 am

Harvard and M.I.T. Scientists Win Gene-Editing Patent Fight (The New York Times)

The Broad Institute in Cambridge, Mass., will retain potentially lucrative rights to a powerful gene-editing technique that could lead to major advances in medicine and agriculture, the federal Patent and Trademark Office ruled on Wednesday.

February 10, 2017 9:00 am

Brain researchers fight National Hockey League’s demand for records (Science)

A pair of Boston University (BU) brain researchers is pushing back against demands by the National Hockey League (NHL) that they release data, brain pathology slides, and interview records of former NHL players and their families. The scientists accumulated the records during their research on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative disease that has been linked to repetitive head trauma.

February 7, 2017 9:00 am

USDA blacks out animal welfare information (Science)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today removed public access to tens of thousands of reports that document the numbers of animals kept by research labs, companies, zoos, circuses, and animal transporters—and whether those animals are being treated humanely under the Animal Welfare Act. Henceforth, those wanting access to the information will need to file a Freedom of Information Act request.

January 27, 2017 9:00 am

Japanese military entices academics to break taboo (Science)

In 1950, Japan’s scientific community, chastened by the complicity of researchers in their nation’s disastrous military adventurism, took an extraordinary vow. “To preserve our integrity as scientists, we express our firm commitment both domestically and abroad that we will never pursue scientific research for the purpose of war,” declared the Science Council of Japan (SCJ), now the nation’s equivalent to the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

January 26, 2017 9:00 am

Human tissues in a dish: The research and ethical implications of organoid technology (Science)

Growing functional human tissues and organs would provide much needed material for regeneration and repair. New technologies are taking us in that direction. In addition to their use in regenerative medicine, stem cells that grow and morph into organ-like structures known as organoids can be used in drug development and toxicology testing. The potential developments and possibilities are numerous and affect not only biomedicine but also areas of ongoing ethical debate.

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