Tag: Supreme Court

Blog Posts (1)

June 7, 2010

Kagan on Bioethics

Hat tip to Business Week for shedding some light on U.S. Supreme Court nominee Elena Kegan’s views on bioethics.

Here’s the rundown:

She’s pro-physician assisted suicide and opposed proposals to ban it in 1997 and has said the DEA lacks the power to penalize physicians who give life-ending drug to patients.…

News (4)

June 18, 2012 6:47 pm

Study: ‘Death Panel’ Myth Persists, One-third Of Americans Still Believe False Claim (KUNC)

As the Supreme Court is about to rule on the constitutionality of the health care law, one-third of Americans are worrying about a part of the legislation that isn’t there. A Kaiser Family Foundation’s tracking poll [.pdf] found in March that 36 percent of respondents erroneously believe that the law “would allow a government panel to make decisions about end-of-life care for people on Medicare.”Another 20 percent said they are not sure whether it does.

May 24, 2012 1:51 pm

Who pays for personalized medicine? (Medical Express)

In a new Perspective piece published today in the , Jason Karlawish, MD, professor of Medicine,  and Health Policy in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and co-author Aaron S. Kesselheim, MD, JD, MPH, from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, delve into a series of high profile court cases testing the limits of .

May 14, 2012 11:30 am

Slippery-Slope Logic, Applied to Health Care (New York Times)

One pernicious category of imaginary risks involves those created by users of the dreaded “slippery slope” arguments. Such arguments are dangerous because they are popular, versatile and often convincing, yet completely fallacious. Worse, they are creeping into an arena that should be above this sort of thing: the Supreme Court, in its deliberations on health care reform.

April 30, 2012 10:44 am

As US Supreme Court mulls healthcare, rumors fly (Chicago Tribune)

This week the U.S. Supreme Court wrapped up the last oral arguments of its current term. Now comes the nationwide angst of waiting – as long as two months – for decisions, particularly the one that will resolve the most high-stakes and closely watched case of the year: the challenge to the Obama-sponsored healthcare law.