Tag: Teaching

Blog Posts (7)

September 20, 2016

My Experience with Texas Campus Carry Laws as a New Professor

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Like many other new assistant professors across America, I spent the weeks before the beginning of the new fall semester in orientations covering everything from my university‚Äôs tenure requirements to how to fill out my health insurance forms to how to get a campus ID card.…

August 2, 2016

Learning Anatomy: Between Fear and Reality

By Wessam Ibrahim Learning Anatomy is a journey.  All medical students have some memories about their anatomy courses; some have good memories and some don’t. It’s October 1995.  I was a first-year medical student at my medical school in Egypt.  I had never seen a corpse except in horror movies.  I was so scared and […]
July 20, 2016

Richard Selzer and Ten Terrific Tales

Richard Selzer and Ten Terrific Tales by Tony Miksanek, MD Family Physician and Author, Raining Stethoscopes If there were a Medical Humanities Hall of Fame, physician-writer Richard Selzer (1928-2016) would be a first-ballot selection. And likely by a unanimous vote. The diminutive doctor had a very large presence in the […]
February 2, 2016

Presence and Vulnerability in Medical Education

By Sunny Nakae In my MSW program I took a diversity and social justice course.  The class was very engaged and often intense; we became well acquainted as we shared our stories.  Mid-way through the semester the instructor assigned us to read an article from our local newspaper about living with HIV.  The article, unbeknownst […]
August 26, 2014

Medical Humanities - Initiating the Journey at Xavier University School of Medicine

Dr P. Ravi Shankar has been facilitating medical humanities sessions for over eight years, first in Nepal and currently in Aruba in the Dutch Caribbean. He has a keen interest in and has written extensively on the subject. He has previously written several pieces for the Literature, Arts, and Medicine blog. I have always enjoyed […]
June 23, 2014

Two Doctors, Two Generations: Q&A with Dr. Barron Lerner

On May 6, 2014, Barron Lerner, MD, PhD, kicked off the Lerner Lectureship series with a talk that explored the evolution of medical ethics through the lens of his father's and his own practice of medicine. Dr. Lerner's father, Phillip I. Lerner, MD, was "a revered clinician, teacher and researcher who always put his patients […]
August 15, 2012

Island Time

As one might expect, much of medical training occurs in the inpatient setting. Teaching hospitals, brimming with an elaborate hierarchy of trainees and supervisors, offer a critical mass of patients and pathology. Typically these patients present with exceptionally complex histories and comorbidities enriching the substrate of the teaching environment. Counter-intuitively, most doctors do not work […]