Hot Topics: Clinical Trials & Studies

Blog Posts (15)

September 30, 2014

Dollars to Doctors: Sun Rises on Sunshine Act’s Open Payments Database

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Today, Tuesday, September 29, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will release most of the Open Payments database.…

August 7, 2014

The Ethics of Ebola and Scarce and Experimental Drugs

by: J.S. Blumenthal-Barby

Yesterday I was contacted by the L.A. Times to answer a simple question: Should we give people access to the experimental Ebola drug, ZMapp?…

June 19, 2014

Community Consultation Should Include Social Media

by Nuriel Moghavem

A New York Times article published this week describes a clinical trial in Pittsburgh where incapacitated and rapidly exsanguinating gunshot victims have their blood replaced by cold saline for up to an hour in an effort to preserve neurological function and life.…

June 10, 2014

Tragedy in Research History: The Children of Ireland

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

For many people, the film Philomena was an introduction to a history of Irish babies being taken from their unwed mothers and adopted to “good” Catholic families in other countries.…

May 9, 2014

Why vampires stay young

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the world of fantasy, the vampire is known for its immortality. In most incarnations, the vampire lives forever in a youthful state by feeding on the blood of humans.…

April 1, 2014

Cute with a Good Story: Social Media Selects Experimental Subjects

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

For patients with a serious illness, accessing cutting edge drugs has just taken a new turn. In the past, a patient with cancer would undergo conventional treatments.…

March 11, 2014

Choosing Wisely: Promising New Tests to Diagnose Alzheimer’s Disease

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

According to an article in Nature Medicine, a new blood test appears to be accurate for diagnosing whether an individual is likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease.…

March 4, 2014

Tampering With Evolution? "Three Parent Embryos"

by Maurice Bernstein, MD

Babies are born with  a progressive neurometabolic disorder with a general onset in infancy or childhood, often after a viral infection, but can also occur in teens and adults. …

December 4, 2013

Where Have All the Negative Results Gone?

by Craig M. Klugman, PhD

This week I gave a lecture at a university in Texas on ways to teach research ethics.…

November 18, 2013

Addressing Unapproved Meningitis Vaccine at Princeton

by Arthur L. Caplan, PhD

Emergency doses of a meningitis vaccine not approved for use in the U.S. are likely to be on the way to Princeton University to halt a meningitis outbreak that has already sickened seven students http://www.nbcnews.com/health/emergency-meningitis-vaccine-will-be-imported-halt-ivy-league-outbreak-2D11603651. …

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Published Articles (5)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 3 - Mar 2014

The Ethics of Advertising for Health Care Services Yael Schenker, Robert M. Arnold & Alex John London

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 12 - Dec 2013

Quality Improvement Ethics: Lessons From the SUPPORT Study Benjamin S. Wilfond

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 12 - Dec 2013

Informed Consent and Standard of Care: What Must Be Disclosed Ruth Macklin & Lois Shepherd

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 12 - Dec 2013

What Should Be Disclosed to Research Participants? David Wendler

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 12 - Dec 2013

The SUPPORT Controversy and the Debate Over Research Within the Standard of Care David Magnus

News (86)

July 22, 2014 4:29 pm

Schizophrenia Linked to 108 Genes

It took 80,000 genetic samples, seven years and the work of 300 scientists from around the world, but scientists now have the most complete dossier on schizophrenia ever.

July 2, 2014 3:33 pm

Study finds vaccine side effects extremely rare

Serious complications related to vaccines are very rare, and there is no evidence that immunizations cause autism, according to an analysis of 67 research studies.

June 4, 2014 2:01 pm

Stress hormone receptors in taste buds 'may help explain emotional eating'

In a new study, the investigators identified receptors for stress-activated hormones located in oral taste buds responsible for detecting sweet, savory and bitter tastes.

May 19, 2014 2:46 pm

‘Right to Try’ laws spur debate over dying patients’ access to experimental drugs

Colorado, Missouri and Louisiana are poised to become the first states in the nation to give terminally ill patients the right to try experimental drugs without the blessing of the Food and Drug Administration, setting the stage for what could be a lengthy battle over who should decide whether a drug is too risky to try.

May 19, 2014 2:45 pm

How to Succeed in Translational Science

An advisory group today offered the National Institutes of Health (NIH) some suggestions for how to frame metrics for evaluating its vast $475 million consortium of translational research centers—such as the need to define what it takes to be a translational scientist. But it’s leaving the details of those metrics to NIH staff.

May 12, 2014 6:54 pm

Wine compound not tied to improved health: study

A compound found in wine and chocolate may not be linked to improved health as was once claimed, according to a new study.

May 8, 2014 5:50 pm

Yawning alot? It's just your body trying to regulate your brain temperature

First we were told yawning meant we were tired. Then it was claimed yawning was the body’s mechanism to keep us awake. Now a new study says yawning cools the brain.

April 25, 2014 1:53 pm

Higher Education Associated With Better Recovery From Traumatic Brain Injury

Better-educated people appear to be significantly more likely to recover from a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), suggesting that a brain’s “cognitive reserve” may play a role in helping people get back to their previous lives, new Johns Hopkins research shows.

April 7, 2014 4:54 pm

Simple Blood Test To Spot Early Lung Cancer Getting Closer

One of these days, there could well be a simple blood test that can help diagnose and track cancers. We aren’t there yet, but a burst of research in this area shows we are getting a lot closer.

April 7, 2014 4:52 pm

Breast Ca Growth Slowed by CDK4/6 Inhibitors

Progression-free survival (PFS) in metastatic breast cancer doubled in women who received a new class of targeted therapy in addition to standard hormonal therapy, a randomized trial showed.

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