Hot Topics: Clinical Trials & Studies

Blog Posts (22)

May 8, 2015

Cost of Compassionate Use is Simply Too High

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen Pharmaceutical Company announced that it has contracted with New York University’s Division of Medical Ethics to assemble an external Compassionate-Use Advisory Committee (CompAC) to examine requests for investigational new drugs (INDs) outside of clinical trials.…

April 15, 2015

Are religious research subjects a vulnerable population?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

A recent study in the journal Psychology Science found that when people are thinking about God, they are more likely to state a willingness to participate in nonmoral,° risky behaviors such as skydiving, substance abuse, and speeding.…

March 26, 2015

Research 2.0: Rise of the Citizen-Scientist and the Death of Privacy

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

On Monday I attended a symposium on inter-professional education. During a session on new technologies in medicine (telemedicine, wearables, and mobile devices) I brought up the question of preserving privacy.…

March 25, 2015

A Pill for Compassion or Misunderstood Science?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

For at least a decade, studies have shown that empathy and compassion decline in medical students.…

March 16, 2015

Ethics of Penile Transplants

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

This weekend, doctors in South Africa announced a new first—a successful penis transplant. The 9-hour operation took place in December 2014.…

February 18, 2015

Precision Medicine Has Imprecise Ethics

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

How do physicians diagnose disease? First they go through a set of symptoms and then compile a list of differential diagnoses or what the underlying disease may be.…

December 8, 2014

Text Messaging: A Cure for Common Nonadherence?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

According to research studies on medication usage, nearly 22% of all e-prescriptions and 28% of new prescriptions are not filled.…

September 30, 2014

Dollars to Doctors: Sun Rises on Sunshine Act’s Open Payments Database

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Today, Tuesday, September 29, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will release most of the Open Payments database.…

August 7, 2014

The Ethics of Ebola and Scarce and Experimental Drugs

by: J.S. Blumenthal-Barby

Yesterday I was contacted by the L.A. Times to answer a simple question: Should we give people access to the experimental Ebola drug, ZMapp?…

June 19, 2014

Community Consultation Should Include Social Media

by Nuriel Moghavem

A New York Times article published this week describes a clinical trial in Pittsburgh where incapacitated and rapidly exsanguinating gunshot victims have their blood replaced by cold saline for up to an hour in an effort to preserve neurological function and life.…

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Published Articles (5)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 3 - Mar 2014

The Ethics of Advertising for Health Care Services Yael Schenker, Robert M. Arnold & Alex John London

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 12 - Dec 2013

Quality Improvement Ethics: Lessons From the SUPPORT Study Benjamin S. Wilfond

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 12 - Dec 2013

Informed Consent and Standard of Care: What Must Be Disclosed Ruth Macklin & Lois Shepherd

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 12 - Dec 2013

What Should Be Disclosed to Research Participants? David Wendler

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 12 - Dec 2013

The SUPPORT Controversy and the Debate Over Research Within the Standard of Care David Magnus

News (89)

August 28, 2015 2:08 pm

Cancer sniffing dogs to aid British doctors

They’re known as man’s best friend; but dogs could soon also be their greatest ally in the fight against prostate cancer. Britain’s National Health Service recently approved a trial for dogs capable of sniffing out prostate cancer in the hope that it could show up inaccuracies in the current PSA (prostate specific antigen) test.

May 18, 2015 3:10 pm

Cystic fibrosis drug offers hope to patients

Patients often die before their 40s as mucus clogs and damages their lungs and leaves them prone to infection.

November 6, 2014 4:01 pm

Drugmakers look to push the boundaries of old age

Google’s ambition to defy the limits of ageing has fired up interest in the field, drawing in drug companies who are already quietly pioneering research, despite the regulatory and clinical hurdles that remain.

July 22, 2014 4:29 pm

Schizophrenia Linked to 108 Genes

It took 80,000 genetic samples, seven years and the work of 300 scientists from around the world, but scientists now have the most complete dossier on schizophrenia ever.

July 2, 2014 3:33 pm

Study finds vaccine side effects extremely rare

Serious complications related to vaccines are very rare, and there is no evidence that immunizations cause autism, according to an analysis of 67 research studies.

June 4, 2014 2:01 pm

Stress hormone receptors in taste buds 'may help explain emotional eating'

In a new study, the investigators identified receptors for stress-activated hormones located in oral taste buds responsible for detecting sweet, savory and bitter tastes.

May 19, 2014 2:46 pm

‘Right to Try’ laws spur debate over dying patients’ access to experimental drugs

Colorado, Missouri and Louisiana are poised to become the first states in the nation to give terminally ill patients the right to try experimental drugs without the blessing of the Food and Drug Administration, setting the stage for what could be a lengthy battle over who should decide whether a drug is too risky to try.

May 19, 2014 2:45 pm

How to Succeed in Translational Science

An advisory group today offered the National Institutes of Health (NIH) some suggestions for how to frame metrics for evaluating its vast $475 million consortium of translational research centers—such as the need to define what it takes to be a translational scientist. But it’s leaving the details of those metrics to NIH staff.

May 12, 2014 6:54 pm

Wine compound not tied to improved health: study

A compound found in wine and chocolate may not be linked to improved health as was once claimed, according to a new study.

May 8, 2014 5:50 pm

Yawning alot? It's just your body trying to regulate your brain temperature

First we were told yawning meant we were tired. Then it was claimed yawning was the body’s mechanism to keep us awake. Now a new study says yawning cools the brain.

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