Hot Topics: Conflict of Interest

Blog Posts (21)

June 12, 2018

“A Little ELF, Please?” The Electronic Long-Form COI Disclosure Statement (ELFCOI)

by Lisa Kearns, MS MA and Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

There is a little discussed problem in academic publishing: the scant amount of information provided by disclosures of conflict that accompany journal articles.…

October 5, 2017

Livestreaming Surgery: New guidelines raise questions of who benefits

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Internet and social media have raised hosts of new ethical issues in the health care world: Should doctors friend their patients?

September 29, 2017

BIOETHICSTV: Gender-change surgery; coercing consent; conflict of interest and impaired judgement

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Late September means the beginning of a new television year. This week saw the return for the 14th season of Grey’s Anatomy and the introduction of a new medical drama, The Good Doctor.

August 9, 2017

Right to Try: Why Logic and Facts Won’t Win This One

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week the U.S. Senate passed bill S. 204, the Trickett Wendler Right to Try Act of 2017.…

May 2, 2017

BioethicsTV: Boundary Crossings, Savior Children, and Euthanasia

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In last week’s episode of Chicago Med (Season 2, Episode 21), Dr. Charles cannot separate his personal and professional roles.…

December 9, 2016

BioethicsTV: Pure Genius is Purely Corrupt

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In this week’s episode (Season 1, Episode 7 -12/8), an FDA reviewer trades a case so that she can review a compassionate use request for a new drug at the hospital where her husband is the chief of staff.…

November 17, 2016

Conflictor-In-Chief: President Trump’s Many Conflicts of Interest

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Every year, my university requires me to file a conflict-of-interest (COI) statement. I had to ask the COI committee for permission in order to use the ethics textbook that I edited for my classes (since I do not receive any residuals on it, there’s no conflict, but had I received money for each sale, I would have).…

July 1, 2016

BioethicsTV: The Night Shift Needs More Sleep

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Summer is a slow time for television and especially for the medical drama. One show that has been filling this warm weather slot is The Night Shift, a fairly uninteresting and poorly done drama.…

April 29, 2016

BioethicsTV: Boundaries are Black and White on Grey’s

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Reaching back to its roots, Grey’s Anatomy in its 12th season has been investigating more professional and ethical challenges in medicine.…

March 1, 2016

Code Black Ends the Season on Bioethics

BioethicsTV is an occasional bioethics.net feature where we examine bioethical issues raised in televised medical dramas.

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The season finale of Code Black (season 1; episode 18 – February 24, 2016) presented a plethora of ethical challenges for the hard working doctors and nurses of Angels Memorial Hospital’s emergency department.…

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Published Articles (4)

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Sep 2017

Is it important to disclose how treatments are selected in clinical research and clinical care? Rahul K. Nayak & David Wendler

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 6 - Jun 2017

Bringing Transparency to Medicine: Exploring Physicians' Views and Experiences of the Sunshine Act Susan Chimonas, Nicholas J. DeVito & David J. Rothman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 6 - Jun 2017

Shining Light on Conflicts of Interest Craig Klugman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 1 - Jan 2017

Tracking U.S. Professional Athletes: The Ethics of Biometric Technologies Katrina Karkazis & Jennifer R. Fishman

News (55)

June 18, 2018 11:16 am

Controversial NIH study of ‘moderate drinking’ will be terminated after scathing report (STAT)

The group examining the Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health (MACH) Trial also found that, starting in 2013, “there was early and frequent engagement” between NIH officials and the alcohol industry that appeared to be “an attempt to persuade industry to support the project. Several members of NIAAA staff kept key facts hidden from other institute staff members.”

May 15, 2018 3:00 pm

More evidence companies pay some doctors to prescribe opioids (NBC News)

Perks such as payments, free meals and speaking fees may be strongly influencing some doctors to prescribe opioids, researchers reported Monday.

February 27, 2018 9:00 am

Opioid makers gave $10 million to drug advocacy groups amid epidemic (NBC News)

Companies selling some of the most lucrative prescription painkillers funneled millions of dollars to advocacy groups that in turn promoted the medications’ use, according to a report released this past week by a U.S. senator.

February 7, 2018 9:00 am

Big tobacco’s offer: $1 billion for research. Should scientists take it? (Science)

Utrecht University (UU) in the Netherlands thought it had nothing to be ashamed of when it accepted a €360,000 research grant from Philip Morris International (PMI) last September. The tobacco giant had agreed to fund a study on cigarette smuggling that had obvious public health importance, and the lead researcher, law professor John Vervaele, would enjoy complete academic freedom. Sure, there had been a “thorough debate” about the grant, Vervaele said in a press release, “but the tobacco industry is not illegal. The illicit tobacco trade is.”

September 12, 2017 9:00 am

What Are Physicians’ Responsibilities to Patients Whose Health Conditions Can Influence Their Legal Proceedings? (AMA Journal of Ethics)

Correctional populations are disproportionately affected by conditions that affect cognition, such as psychiatric illness and head trauma. Honoring bioethical principles in the care of such patients can be particularly difficult in the correctional setting. However, the approach should not change markedly because a patient is incarcerated.

March 16, 2017 9:00 am

Should hospitals — and doctors — apologize for medical mistakes? (Washington Post)

Spurred by concerns about the “deny and defend” model — including its cost, lack of transparency and the perpetuation of errors — programs to circumvent litigation by offering prompt disclosure, apology and compensation for mistakes as an alternative to malpractice suits are becoming more popular.

February 10, 2017 9:00 am

Brain researchers fight National Hockey League’s demand for records (Science)

A pair of Boston University (BU) brain researchers is pushing back against demands by the National Hockey League (NHL) that they release data, brain pathology slides, and interview records of former NHL players and their families. The scientists accumulated the records during their research on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative disease that has been linked to repetitive head trauma.

February 9, 2017 9:00 am

India scraps funding ties with Gates Foundation on immunization (Reuters)

A group backed by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that works on India’s immunization program will now be funded by the health ministry, a government official said, a move in part prompted by fears foreign donors could influence policy making.

November 2, 2016 8:00 am

Publisher pulls 58 articles by Iranian scientists over authorship manipulation (Nature)

A tranche of 58 articles authored by 282 Iran-based researchers were retracted today by a leading scientific publisher, which said it had found signs that the peer review and publication processes had been compromised.

October 27, 2016 8:00 am

How drugs intended for patients ended up in the hands of illegal users: ‘No one was doing their job’ (Washington Post)

For 10 years, the government waged a behind-the-scenes war against pharmaceutical companies that hardly anyone knows: wholesale distributors of prescription narcotics that ship drugs from manufacturers to consumers.

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