Hot Topics: Conflict of Interest

Blog Posts (26)

December 12, 2018

Hospitals Selling Patient Records To Data Brokers: A Violation of Patient Trust and Autonomy

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

I recently received an email from a community organization which asked the following question: “Are there any ethical issues with our community health plan selling its medical records to a private company?” This is not an example of a new occurrence.…

November 2, 2018

Could an ELF Have Saved Baselga?

by Lisa Kearns, MS, MA, and Arthur Caplan, PhD

A few months ago we called for a new conflict of interest (COI) disclosure policy.…

October 26, 2018

BioethicsTV (October 22-26): #TheResident, #NewAmsterdam, #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“Exploring ethical issues in TV medical dramas”

Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 5): Buying Thought Leaders and Handsy Docs; Jump to New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 5): Gun shootings; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 5): Genetic secrets and duty to inform

Resident (Season 2; Episode 5): Buying Thought Leaders and Handsy Docs

Bell negotiates a deal with a new start-up medical device company: For a substantial discount, he will make the company the sole source of medical devices at the hospital.…

October 22, 2018

BioethicsTV (October 15-18) #TheResident, #TheGoodDoctor, #NewAmsterdam, #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“Exploring ethical issues in TV medical dramas”

Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 4): Medical Lawsuits; Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 4): Inappropriate coercion to remove autonomy; Jump to New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 4): Conflicts of interest; Giving bad news; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4: Episode 4): When medicine and immigration collide; tough choices


The Resident (Season 2; Episode 4): Medical Lawsuits

This episode is less about particular stories than the about the topic of malpractice lawsuits.…

October 1, 2018

Sloan Kettering Controversies: Trust is the Public Foundation of Medical Research

by Ann Mongoven, PhD, MPH

Recent controversies at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center raise ethical questions about medical research that deserve public attention.…

June 12, 2018

“A Little ELF, Please?” The Electronic Long-Form COI Disclosure Statement (ELFCOI)

by Lisa Kearns, MS MA and Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

There is a little discussed problem in academic publishing: the scant amount of information provided by disclosures of conflict that accompany journal articles.…

October 5, 2017

Livestreaming Surgery: New guidelines raise questions of who benefits

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Internet and social media have raised hosts of new ethical issues in the health care world: Should doctors friend their patients?

September 29, 2017

BIOETHICSTV: Gender-change surgery; coercing consent; conflict of interest and impaired judgement

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Late September means the beginning of a new television year. This week saw the return for the 14th season of Grey’s Anatomy and the introduction of a new medical drama, The Good Doctor.

August 9, 2017

Right to Try: Why Logic and Facts Won’t Win This One

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week the U.S. Senate passed bill S. 204, the Trickett Wendler Right to Try Act of 2017.…

May 2, 2017

BioethicsTV: Boundary Crossings, Savior Children, and Euthanasia

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In last week’s episode of Chicago Med (Season 2, Episode 21), Dr. Charles cannot separate his personal and professional roles.…

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Published Articles (6)

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 9 Issue 3 - Nov 2018

Conflicts of interest policies for authors, peer reviewers, and editors of bioethics journals Zubin Master, Kelly Werner, Elise Smith, David B. Resnik & Bryn Williams-Jones

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 7 - Jul 2018

“A Little ELF, Please?” The Electronic Long-Form COI Disclosure Statement (ELFCOI) Lisa Kearns & Arthur Caplan

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Sep 2017

Is it important to disclose how treatments are selected in clinical research and clinical care? Rahul K. Nayak & David Wendler

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 6 - Jun 2017

Bringing Transparency to Medicine: Exploring Physicians' Views and Experiences of the Sunshine Act Susan Chimonas, Nicholas J. DeVito & David J. Rothman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 6 - Jun 2017

Shining Light on Conflicts of Interest Craig Klugman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 1 - Jan 2017

Tracking U.S. Professional Athletes: The Ethics of Biometric Technologies Katrina Karkazis & Jennifer R. Fishman

News (63)

December 14, 2018 11:43 am

Gene editing: who should decide? (Nature)

Last month’s announcement claiming the birth of the world’s first genome-edited babies has sparked a furore over how to regulate this cutting-edge technology (see Nature 563, 607–608; 2018, and Nature564, 5; 2018). In our view, piling up scientist-led conferences modelled on Asilomar in 1975 (see Nature 526, 293–294; 2015) without any clear consensus is futile.

December 11, 2018 9:15 am

What These Medical Journals Don’t Reveal: Top Doctors’ Ties to Industry (The New York Times)

The Sarah Cannon Research Institute, based in Nashville, received nearly $8 million in payments from drug companies on behalf of its president for clinical operations, Dr. Howard Burris, largely for research work. Dozens of his articles published in prestigious medical journals did not include the required disclosures of those payments and relationships.

December 9, 2018 12:47 pm

Why Are Scientists So Upset About the First Crispr Babies? (The New York Times)

A Chinese scientist recently claimed he had produced the world’s first gene-edited babies, setting off a global firestorm. If true — the scientist has not yet published data that would confirm it — his actions would be a sensational breach of international scientific conventions. Although gene editing holds promise to potentially correct dangerous disease-causing mutations and treat some medical conditions, there are many safety and ethical concerns about editing human embryos.

Here are answers to some of the numerous questions swirling around this development.

December 6, 2018 4:15 pm

Should We Edit the Human Germline? Is Consensus Possible or Even Desirable? (The Hastings Center)

On the one hand, reports of a rogue scientist, He Jiankui, who contravened the scientific and ethical norms that should guide the development of human genome editing reinforces the need for clarity about those norms and international monitoring of advances in the field. On the other hand, it shows the weaknesses and limitations of voluntary efforts – like the summit – to guide scientists’ practices. They lack any real enforcement power on their own, and have largely served to ensure that human genome editing research can continue, rather than promote reflection on whether we should edit the human germline in the first place.

October 29, 2018 9:00 am

Altria to Stop Selling Some E-Cigarette Brands That Appeal to Youths (New York Times)

Under pressure to curb vaping among young people, the tobacco giant Altria announced on Thursday that it would discontinue most of its flavored e-cigarettes and stop selling some brands altogether.

September 20, 2018 1:09 pm

California Sues AbbVie Over Alleged Arthritis Drug Kickbacks (Bloomberg)

California’s insurance regulator is suing AbbVie Inc., alleging that the pharmaceutical giant gave illegal kickbacks to health-care providers in order to keep patients on its blockbuster rheumatoid arthritis drug Humira.

September 17, 2018 12:00 pm

Medicine’s Financial Contamination (The New York Times)

The fall from grace last week of Dr. José Baselga, the former chief scientific officer of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, illuminated a longstanding problem of modern medicine: Potentially corrupting payments by drug and medical device makers to influential people at research hospitals are far more common than either side publicly acknowledges.

August 13, 2018 4:11 am

Japanese medical university admits to discriminating against female applicants (Science)

A prominent Japanese medical university said yesterday that school administrators have deliberately manipulated entrance exam scores to limit the number of women admitted. The confession helps explain the lopsided gender ratio of graduates from Tokyo Medical University (TMU) and strengthens suspicions that similar practices have prevailed at other Japanese medical schools.

June 18, 2018 11:16 am

Controversial NIH study of ‘moderate drinking’ will be terminated after scathing report (STAT)

The group examining the Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health (MACH) Trial also found that, starting in 2013, “there was early and frequent engagement” between NIH officials and the alcohol industry that appeared to be “an attempt to persuade industry to support the project. Several members of NIAAA staff kept key facts hidden from other institute staff members.”

May 15, 2018 3:00 pm

More evidence companies pay some doctors to prescribe opioids (NBC News)

Perks such as payments, free meals and speaking fees may be strongly influencing some doctors to prescribe opioids, researchers reported Monday.

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