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Blog Posts (89)

November 14, 2017

What is the purpose of Ethics Education?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Those of us who teach bioethics and ethics-in-general face a dilemma during every class session: How much of our own perspectives and analyses do we bring to the classroom?…

November 10, 2017

Refocusing professional standards and leadership for patient empowerment

This post is written in response to Ubel, Scherr and Fagerlin’s target article, “Empowerment Failure: How Shortcomings in Physician Communication Unwittingly Undermine Patient Autonomy” published in the November 2017 issue of The American Journal of Bioethics.

October 24, 2017

When the Government Prevents a Teen from Receiving an Abortion

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Update: The U.S. Court of Appeals in D.C. full panel ordered the government to arrange for Doe to receive her abortion.

October 12, 2017

The Rescinding of DACA: What Should Healthcare Professionals and Academics Do? (And Why?)

by Mark G. Kuczewski, Ph.D. Danish Zaidi, MTS, MBE

Imagine that the 14th Amendment is repealed. Suddenly, birthright citizenship is no longer the accepted law of the United States.…

September 29, 2017

BIOETHICSTV: Gender-change surgery; coercing consent; conflict of interest and impaired judgement

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Late September means the beginning of a new television year. This week saw the return for the 14th season of Grey’s Anatomy and the introduction of a new medical drama, The Good Doctor.

September 15, 2017

Medical Gawking Case Points to Need for Culture Change

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

According to a news report in The Washington Post, a number of medical staff at a Pittsburgh hospital have been reprimanded over a gross violation of a patient’s privacy.…

August 17, 2017

The Aftermath of Charlottesville: What’s a bioethicist to do?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Figuring out how to respond to one of the most egregious displays of racism in modern times (U.S.)  is not an easy task.…

August 9, 2017

Right to Try: Why Logic and Facts Won’t Win This One

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week the U.S. Senate passed bill S. 204, the Trickett Wendler Right to Try Act of 2017.…

July 24, 2017

When a doctor calls a patient a racial slur, who is hurt?

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Last week Lexi Carter, a black woman from Tennessee had an experience that so many other black people have had, a racially charged visit with a doctor.…

June 1, 2017

When Ideology Trumps Reason, Do The Life Sciences Resist or Capitulate?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The world of the life sciences and medicine is being changed radically in 2017. The proposed Trump budget cuts funding for the CDC, NIH, NSF, NEH, NEA, EPA, and PHS will radically change how science is done, how much science is done and by whom.…

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Published Articles (29)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 11 - Nov 2017

The Rescinding of DACA: What Should Healthcare Professionals and Academics Do? (and Why?) Mark G. Kuczewski & Danish Zaidi

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

Saving Life, Limb, and Eyesight: Assessing the Medical Rules of Eligibility During Armed Conflict Michael L. Gross

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2017

Ethical and Legal Concerns Associated With the Comprehension of Legal Language and Concepts Joseph Wszalek

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2017

tDCS Research in a World With FDA Regulation Patricia J. Zettler

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Sep 2017

Physician understanding and application of surrogate decision-making laws in clinical practice Amber Rose Comer, Margaret Gaffney, Cynthia L. Stone & Alexia Torke

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

Now is the Time for a Postracial Medicine: Biomedical Research, the National Institutes of Health, and the Perpetuation of Scientific Racism Javier Perez-Rodriguez & Alejandro de la Fuente

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

We Can and Must Rebuild the Bridges of Interdisciplinary Bioethics Darryl R. J. Macer

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

The interactions of Canadian ethics consultants with health care managers and governing boards during times of crisis Chris Kaposy, Victor Maddalena, Fern Brunger, Daryl Pullman & Richard Singleton

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

Does experience matter? Implications for community consultation for research in emergency settings Victoria M. Scicluna, Mohammed K. Ali, Rebecca D. Pentz, David W. Wright & Neal W. Dickert

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 5 - May 2017

Ethical Issues in Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Practice Yonghui Ma, Jiayu Liu, Catherine Rhodes, Yongzhan Nie & Faming Zhang

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News (168)

November 8, 2017 9:00 am

When Will the ‘Harvey Effect’ Reach Academia? (The Atlantic)

The open secret in academia is how many women face sexual harassment on a regular basis. A 2015 survey conducted by the Association of American Universities at 27 elite private and public research universities found that roughly one in 10 female graduate students states that she has been sexually harassed by a faculty member at her university.

November 6, 2017 9:00 am

She signed up to be a surrogate mother — and unwittingly gave away her own child (Washington Post)

A DNA test would soon reveal the truth: One of the “twins” was actually Allen and Jasper’s biological son. Despite using condoms, they had apparently conceived the child after becoming pregnant with the Lius’ baby, in what is believed to be an extremely rare case of superfetation. The condition — in which an already pregnant woman conceives another child — is so rare that alleged cases are usually treated with skepticism. In a widely publicized 2009 case of a pregnant Arkansas woman becoming pregnant “again,” Karen Boyle, a reproductive medicine specialist, told ABC News that there were only about 10 reported cases of superfetation in medical literature.

October 31, 2017 9:00 am

A healthier Halloween for kids, without cutting out candy? Yes, really. (Washington Post)

There is plenty of debate about whether parents should limit their kids’ access to Halloween activities and candy, in the name of fending off a lifetime of sugar cravings, or let them eat their fill. With childhood obesity on the rise and many parents eager to limit added sugars in their children’s diet, which approach is best for helping kids learn healthy eating habits?

October 11, 2017 9:00 am

Is it easier to buy guns than Sudafed? (CNN)

“It is harder in America to buy two packs of Sudafed than 10 assault rifles,” comedian D.L. Hughley said on his radio show Monday, the day after a gunman opened fire on a concert crowd in Las Vegas.

October 3, 2017 10:00 am

Teenage suicide is extremely difficult to predict. That’s why some experts are turning to machines for help. (Washington Post)

Researchers from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center are testing an app in schools that analyzes language to determine whether teens are at risk for suicide.

September 29, 2017 9:00 am

How to teach children about gender equality (CNN)

Parents can help teach their kids about gender equality by never using gender as an excuse for behavior, experts say.

September 26, 2017 1:03 pm

Wikipedia shapes language in science papers (Nature)

Wikipedia is one of the world’s most popular websites, but scientists rarely cite it in their papers. Despite this, the online encyclopedia seems to be shaping the language that researchers use in papers, according to an experiment showing that words and phrases in recently published Wikipedia articles subsequently appeared more frequently in scientific papers.

August 25, 2017 9:00 am

Teen drug overdose death rate climbed 19% in one year (CNN)

The rate of teen drug overdose deaths in the United States climbed 19% from 2014 to 2015, from 3.1 deaths per 100,000 teens to 3.7 per 100,000, according to data released this week. The new numbers involve teens ages 15 to 19 and were released by the National Center for Health Statistics.

August 22, 2017 9:00 am

China’s embrace of embryo selection raises thorny questions (Nature)

Early experiments are beginning to show how genome-editing technologies such as CRISPR might one day fix disease-causing mutations before embryos are implanted. But refining the techniques and getting regulatory approval will take years. PGD has already helped thousands of couples. And whereas the expansion of PGD around the world has generally been slow, in China, it is starting to explode.

August 16, 2017 9:00 am

Commit to talks on patient data and public health (Nature)

Of course it was going to happen — and now it has. Last week, an international team reported the use of CRISPR–Cas9 gene-editing techniques to correct a heart-wrenching mutation in human embryos. These attempts worked several times more efficiently than previous ones had, and avoided introducing new genetic errors. Although the embryos were never destined to be used for pregnancies (and have now been destroyed), the work — carried out mainly in the United States — makes it easy to foresee practical applications to genetically alter human embryos.

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