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Blog Posts (90)

December 5, 2017

#METOO Bioethics

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the December 4 episode of The Good Doctor, a medical resident is sexually harassed by her attending, who touches her when she is interacting with patients and asks her out to dinner.…

November 14, 2017

What is the purpose of Ethics Education?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Those of us who teach bioethics and ethics-in-general face a dilemma during every class session: How much of our own perspectives and analyses do we bring to the classroom?…

November 10, 2017

Refocusing professional standards and leadership for patient empowerment

This post is written in response to Ubel, Scherr and Fagerlin’s target article, “Empowerment Failure: How Shortcomings in Physician Communication Unwittingly Undermine Patient Autonomy” published in the November 2017 issue of The American Journal of Bioethics.

October 24, 2017

When the Government Prevents a Teen from Receiving an Abortion

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Update: The U.S. Court of Appeals in D.C. full panel ordered the government to arrange for Doe to receive her abortion.

October 12, 2017

The Rescinding of DACA: What Should Healthcare Professionals and Academics Do? (And Why?)

by Mark G. Kuczewski, Ph.D. Danish Zaidi, MTS, MBE

Imagine that the 14th Amendment is repealed. Suddenly, birthright citizenship is no longer the accepted law of the United States.…

September 29, 2017

BIOETHICSTV: Gender-change surgery; coercing consent; conflict of interest and impaired judgement

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Late September means the beginning of a new television year. This week saw the return for the 14th season of Grey’s Anatomy and the introduction of a new medical drama, The Good Doctor.

September 15, 2017

Medical Gawking Case Points to Need for Culture Change

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

According to a news report in The Washington Post, a number of medical staff at a Pittsburgh hospital have been reprimanded over a gross violation of a patient’s privacy.…

August 17, 2017

The Aftermath of Charlottesville: What’s a bioethicist to do?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Figuring out how to respond to one of the most egregious displays of racism in modern times (U.S.)  is not an easy task.…

August 9, 2017

Right to Try: Why Logic and Facts Won’t Win This One

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week the U.S. Senate passed bill S. 204, the Trickett Wendler Right to Try Act of 2017.…

July 24, 2017

When a doctor calls a patient a racial slur, who is hurt?

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Last week Lexi Carter, a black woman from Tennessee had an experience that so many other black people have had, a racially charged visit with a doctor.…

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Published Articles (29)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 11 - Nov 2017

The Rescinding of DACA: What Should Healthcare Professionals and Academics Do? (and Why?) Mark G. Kuczewski & Danish Zaidi

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

Saving Life, Limb, and Eyesight: Assessing the Medical Rules of Eligibility During Armed Conflict Michael L. Gross

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2017

Ethical and Legal Concerns Associated With the Comprehension of Legal Language and Concepts Joseph Wszalek

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2017

tDCS Research in a World With FDA Regulation Patricia J. Zettler

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Sep 2017

Physician understanding and application of surrogate decision-making laws in clinical practice Amber Rose Comer, Margaret Gaffney, Cynthia L. Stone & Alexia Torke

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

Now is the Time for a Postracial Medicine: Biomedical Research, the National Institutes of Health, and the Perpetuation of Scientific Racism Javier Perez-Rodriguez & Alejandro de la Fuente

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

We Can and Must Rebuild the Bridges of Interdisciplinary Bioethics Darryl R. J. Macer

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

The interactions of Canadian ethics consultants with health care managers and governing boards during times of crisis Chris Kaposy, Victor Maddalena, Fern Brunger, Daryl Pullman & Richard Singleton

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

Does experience matter? Implications for community consultation for research in emergency settings Victoria M. Scicluna, Mohammed K. Ali, Rebecca D. Pentz, David W. Wright & Neal W. Dickert

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 5 - May 2017

Ethical Issues in Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Practice Yonghui Ma, Jiayu Liu, Catherine Rhodes, Yongzhan Nie & Faming Zhang

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News (178)

January 19, 2018 9:00 am

Fed Up With Drug Companies, Hospitals Decide to Start Their Own (The New York Times)

A group of large hospital systems plans to create a nonprofit generic drug company to battle shortages and high prices.

January 1, 2018 9:00 am

Will Gathering Vast Troves of Information Really Lead To Better Health? (NPR)

The Mayo Clinic is building its future around high-tech approaches to research known as “precision medicine.” This involves gathering huge amounts of information from genetic tests, medical records and other data sources to ferret out unexpected ideas to advance health. But one longtime scientist at the Mayo Clinic isn’t playing along. Dr. Michael Joyner is a skeptical voice in a sea of eager advocates.

December 28, 2017 9:00 am

The Case of Dr. Oz: Ethics, Evidence, and Does Professional Self-Regulation Work? (Journal Of Medical Ethics)

Dr. Mehmet Oz is widely known not just as a successful media personality donning the title “America’s Doctor,” but, we suggest, also as a physician visibly out of step with his profession. A recent, unsuccessful attempt to censure Dr. Oz raises the issue of whether the medical profession can effectively self-regulate at all. It also raises concern that the medical profession’s self-regulation might be selectively activated, perhaps only when the subject of professional censure has achieved a level of public visibility.

December 25, 2017 9:00 am

The uncharted emotional territory of gifting DNA tests to family (NBC News)

The family that spits together might not want to receive their health results together. In the new era of DNA testing, there can be tricky family dynamics.

December 21, 2017 9:00 am

AI algorithms to prevent suicide gain traction (Nature)

A growing number of researchers and tech companies are beginning to mine social media for warning signs of suicidal thoughts. Their efforts build on emerging evidence that the language patterns of a person’s social-media posts, as well as the subconscious ways they interact with their smartphone can hint at psychiatric trouble.
December 6, 2017 9:00 am

Smartphone addiction could be changing your brain (CNN)

“NO MObile PHOne phoBIA” is a 21st-century term for the fear of not being able to use your cell phone or other smart device. Cell phone addiction is on the rise, surveys show, and a new study released Thursday adds to a growing body of evidence that smartphone and internet addiction is harming our minds — literally.

December 4, 2017 9:00 am

Moms, should you eat your placentas? (Science)

Celebrity socialite Kim Kardashian West says it boosted her energy level. Mad Men’s January Jones touts it as a cure for postpartum depression. But does eating one’s placenta after birth—an apparently growing practice around the globe—actually confer any health benefits? Not really, according to the first in-depth analyses of the practice.

November 30, 2017 9:00 am

Sexual harassment: How it stands around the globe (CNN)

The fact is that sexual harassment is part and parcel of daily life, particularly in public places, Jewkes believes. “It’s used to curtail a woman’s freedom.”
In the streets of London, Mumbai, Washington or Lagos, the recent outpouring of stories from women using #MeToo and its many iterations has showed the uniformity of the problem — irrespective of country and culture.
November 24, 2017 9:00 am

The truth behind the ‘first marijuana overdose death’ headlines (Washington Post)

A case report about the seizure and death of an 11-month old after exposure to cannabis has prompted headlines about “the first marijuana overdose death” this week. Except that’s not what the doctors meant.

November 17, 2017 9:00 am

Training men and boys to honor women in the age of #MeToo (CNN)

As millions of women continue to share their stories of sexual abuse and harassment in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein scandal, men from all walks of life have responded.

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