Hot Topics: Education

Blog Posts (4)

October 5, 2018

Crowdsourcing: A New Resource for Advanced Training in Bioethics

by Lindsay Zausmer Feuerman, BA and Amy McGuire JD, Ph.D.1

Anincreasing numberof universities offer undergraduate courses and even majors in the fields of bioethics and medical humanities.…

August 14, 2018

Is Japan Alone in Disadvantaging Female Medical School Applicants?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last December, I wrote a post about #MeToo in bioethics. I wish this could be a one-time topic and all of the problems were fixed, but alas this is a problem of structural inequality.…

July 31, 2018

Credentialing Exam is A Battle for Power and Soul of Bioethics

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Like most members of the American Society for Bioethics & Humanities (ASBH), I received an email last week geared toward enticing me to sign up to take the new Healthcare Ethics Consultant accreditation exam.…

June 19, 2018

Trumps Willing Executioners: Why We Should Just Say No

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In 1996, Daniel Goldhagen published Hitler’s Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust, where he argued that most Germans were complicit in the Holocaust because anti-Semitism was a key part of national identity.…

Published Articles (4)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

Were the “Pioneer” Clinical Ethics Consultants “Outsiders”? For Them, Was “Critical Distance” That Critical? Bruce D. White, Wayne N. Shelton & Cassandra J. Rivais

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

Outsider/Insider Albert R. Jonsen

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 9 Issue 2 - Jun 2018

An empirical assessment of the short-term impacts of a reading of Deborah Zoe Laufer's drama Informed Consent on attitudes and intentions to participate in genetic research Erin Rothwell, Jeffrey R. Botkin, Sydney Cheek-O'Donnell, Bob Wong, Gretchen A. Case, Erin Johnson, Trent Matheson, Alena Wilson, Nicole R. Robinson, Jared Rawlings, Brooke Horejsi, Ana Maria Lopez & Carrie L. Byington

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 9 Issue 2 - Jun 2018

Undisclosed conflicts of interest among biomedical textbook authors Brian J. Piper, Drew A. Lambert, Ryan C. Keefe, Phoebe U. Smukler, Nicolas A. Selemon & Zachary R. Duperry

News (4)

October 4, 2018 9:00 am

Genetic determinism rides again (Nature)

It’s never a good time for another bout of genetic determinism, but it’s hard to imagine a worse one than this. Social inequality gapes, exacerbated by climate change, driving hostility towards immigrants and flares of militant racism. At such a juncture, yet another expression of the discredited, simplistic idea that genes alone control human nature seems particularly insidious. And yet, here we are again with Blueprint, by educational psychologist Robert Plomin.

September 17, 2018 9:00 am

'Lots of lads I know wouldn't give it a shot': the men starting care careers (The Guardian)

Wilding is one of the small – but slowly growing – number of male care workers in the UK; men make up just 18% of the social care workforce – an increase of two percentage points since 2015… A staggering 85% of men, and 76% of men aged 16-25, say they are unlikely to start a career in adult social care, while 35% of the public think working in a care home is a “woman’s career”.

August 17, 2018 9:00 am

Treating Teen Depression Might Improve Mental Health Of Parents Too (NPR)

An estimated 12.8 percent of adolescents in the U.S. experience at least one episode of major depression, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. According to previous studies, many of those teens’ mental health is linked to depression in their parents. But new research suggests there’s a flipside to that parental effect: When teens are treated for depression, their parents’ mental health improves, too.

August 13, 2018 4:11 am

Japanese medical university admits to discriminating against female applicants (Science)

A prominent Japanese medical university said yesterday that school administrators have deliberately manipulated entrance exam scores to limit the number of women admitted. The confession helps explain the lopsided gender ratio of graduates from Tokyo Medical University (TMU) and strengthens suspicions that similar practices have prevailed at other Japanese medical schools.