Hot Topics: Genetics

Blog Posts (39)

April 16, 2015

A Drive-By Shot at the Concept of “Liberal Neutrality”

A couple of writings by Gregory Kaebnick, the editor of the Hastings Center Report, have my attention these days, and I hope to deal with them in my next few posts.  For the moment, I intend to seize on one point he makes in “Engineered Microbes in Industry and Science,” his chapter in a book he co-edited with Thomas Murray, 2013’s Synthetic Biology and Morality. ... // Read More »
April 13, 2015

Residual Dried Blood and New Born Screening in Minnesota

Note: The Bioethics Program blog is moving to its new home on April 1, 2015. Be sure to change your bookmarks to http://bioethics.uniongraduatecollege.edu/blog/ by Courtney Jarboe, Bioethics Program Student In Minnesota, residual dried blood (RDB) samples collected for newborn screening had been stored, retained, and used for research without parental consent. It had been presumed that the Minnesota Department of […]
March 21, 2015

Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis and Abortion

The predominant purpose of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is to select those embryos that are considered healthy or normal. This inevitably means that those that have a genetic abnormality are discarded. Foundational to how one responds to PGD will be their understanding of the personhood of the human embryo. Often, the ethical debate is approached from the assumption that human life at this stage of... // Read More »
March 12, 2015

Taking Precautions

A common argument by ethicists concerned about the implications of bleeding-edge biotechnologies is an appeal to what is called the “precautionary principle.”  This appeal is particularly prominent on the European continent.  It attempts to raise concerns about the metaphysical, essential nature of a new technology, as opposed to the more pragmatist (and consequentialist) approach taken in Britain and the U.S.  I suppose that split should... // Read More »
March 6, 2015

“The Natural”

Saying nothing new, but trying to say it in a different way… One response to ethical problems posed by bleeding-edge biotechnologies is to assert that there are some things that ought not be attempted, some boundaries that ought never be transgressed, regardless of the supposed good that may be envisioned.  (I continue to hold that human IVF was one such boundary, but that was definitively... // Read More »
March 1, 2015

Fools Rushing In?

Trevor Stammers is our guest blogger for today.  Dr. Stammers is the Programme Director for Bioethics and Medical Law at St. Mary’s University, Twickenham in London.  Prior to St. Mary’s, he practiced as a family physician for 27 years and was a senior tutor in General Practice at St George’s, University of London.  He is also the editor for the multidisciplinary journal The New Bioethics.  Thanks... // Read More »
March 1, 2015

Fools Rushing In?

Trevor Stammers is our guest blogger for today.  Dr. Stammers is the Programme Director for Bioethics and Medical Law at St. Mary’s University, Twickenham in London.  Prior to St. Mary’s, he practiced as a family physician for 27 years and was a senior tutor in General Practice at St George’s, University of London.  He is also the editor for the multidisciplinary journal The New Bioethics.  Thanks... // Read More »
February 27, 2015

Collating Some Resources about 3-Parent IVF

With the recent news that Great Britain will indeed forge ahead with the use of nuclear transfer techniques to create “3-parent babies,” in an effort to interdict maternally-inherited mitochondrial disease, and in light of Courtney Thiele’s February 9 post on this blog (with the associated discussion), I thought it might be useful to take a moment and pull together some links to past discussions on... // Read More »
January 31, 2015

Cinematic Cautionary Tales

As a Netflix aficionado, I have seen more than my fair share of movies that are centered around the dangers of misusing biotechnologies. To the undiscerning eye, they are nothing more than thrillers or action movies with great CGI, but a more in-depth look will reveal that these films act as cautionary tales. Tales that are often ignored. I could name dozens of movies that... // Read More »
January 28, 2015

Still Alice: A Portrait of Familial Alzheimer’s Disease

by Craig M. Klugman, Ph.D.

This past weekend I spent a cold, snowy day in the theater watching the movie Still Alice.…

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Published Articles (41)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 2 - Feb 2015

Collectivizing Rescue Obligations in Bioethics Jeremy R. Garrett

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 11 - Nov 2014

Protecting Posted Genes: Social Networking and the Limits of GINA Sandra Soo-Jin Lee & Emily Borgelt

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 3 - Mar 2014

Addressing the Ethical Challenges in Genetic Testing and Sequencing of Children Ellen Wright Clayton, Laurence B. McCullough, Leslie G. Biesecker, Steven Joffe, Lainie Friedman Ross, Susan M. Wolf & For the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) Consortium Pediatrics Working Group

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 3 - Mar 2014

Ethics and Empiricism in the Formation of Professional Guidelines Mildred K. Cho

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 10 - Oct 2013

Gender Eugenics? The Ethics of PGD for Intersex Conditions Robert Sparrow

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 10 - Oct 2013

Critically Appraising Prenatal Genetic Diagnosis to Prevent Disorders of Sexual Development: An Opportunity Missed Laurence B. McCullough

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 5 - May 2013

The Right to Know Your Genetic Parents: From Open-Identity Gamete Donation to Routine Paternity Testing An Ravelingien & Guido Pennings

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 2 - Feb 2013

Do Researchers Have an Obligation to Actively Look for Genetic Incidental Findings? Catherine Gliwa & Benjamin E. Berkman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 2 - Feb 2013

What To Do With the Could-Be-Knowns of Genomic Medicine Richard R. Sharp

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 12 Issue 10 - Oct 2012

Review of Marion Danis, Emily Largent, David Wendler, Sara Chandros Hull, Seema Shah, Joseph Millum, Benjamin Berkman, and Christine Grady, Research Ethics Consultation: A Casebook Emily E. Anderson

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News (807)

April 15, 2015 2:08 pm

U.S. study calls into question tests that sequence tumor genes

New cancer tests that sequence only a patient’s tumor and not normal tissue could result in a significant number of false positive results, potentially leading doctors to prescribe treatments that might not work, U.S. researchers said on Wednesday.

April 15, 2015 2:06 pm

Is the placebo effect in some people’s genes?

Some people may be genetically programmed to feel better after taking placebo pills, while others may only heal with real drugs, suggests a new review of existing research.

April 13, 2015 2:11 pm

'Open Humans' Network Launched to Share DNA and Other Data

People eager to share personal information beyond what’s on their Facebook profile have another outlet: an online platform launching on Tuesday will let them give scientists information about their genomes, gut bacteria and other biological data.

April 6, 2015 1:10 pm

DNA of 'an entire nation' assessed

The reports, published in the journal Nature Genetics, used the data to make a suite of discoveries including the age of the last common ancestor of men.

April 6, 2015 1:05 pm

Ancestry.com uses spit to find your long-lost relatives

Would you spit in a tube and spend $99 to find out you were related to a famous 18th-century revolutionary or a notorious 19th-century bank robber?

April 3, 2015 1:08 pm

Stanford faculty lend voices to call for “genome editing” guidelines

Stanford law professor Hank Greely, JD, and biochemist Paul Berg, PhD, are two of 20 scientists who have signed a letter in today’s issue of Science Express discussing the need to develop guidelines to regulate genome editing tools like the recently discovered Crispr/Cas9.
April 3, 2015 1:03 pm

New gene-altering technique worries scientists

A revolutionary technique developed at UC Berkeley to alter the DNA in human cells could pose such unknown risks if it is misused that a group of eminent biologists is calling for an international slow-down in its application.

April 2, 2015 4:30 pm

DNA Blood Test Accurately Identifies Down Syndrome in Fetus

A DNA-based blood test may be more effective in detecting possible Down syndrome in unborn children compared to other screening methods, according to findings published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

March 5, 2015 6:25 pm

Engineering the Perfect Baby

Can we improve the human gene pool? The position of much of mainstream science has been that such meddling would be unsafe, irresponsible, and even impossible.

February 18, 2015 3:15 pm

U.S. approves first biotech apple that resists browning

U.S. regulators on Friday approved what would be the first commercialized biotech apple, rejecting efforts by the organic industry and other GMO critics to block the new fruit.

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