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Blog Posts (1799)

April 20, 2015

How should we define infertility and who counts as infertile?

<div style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">The concept of infertility seems relatively straightforward, yet there are many myths, confusions, and disagreements regarding who counts as being infertile. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), <a href="http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/topics/infertility/definitions/en/">infertility is</a> "a disease of the reproductive system defined by the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse.”Like many definitions of infertility, this one is based on a woman's body since she is the one who experiences pregnancy. However, this definition may make it more difficult to understand and recognize male factor infertility.Indeed, defining infertility based solely on a woman's ability to achieve pregnancy reinforces the myth that women are more likely to be infertile than men. In reality, women and men are equally likely to be infertile. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) <a href="http://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/infertility/Pages/default.aspx">definition of infertility</a> is more inclusive: “the inability of a woman or man to conceive a child or the inability of a woman to carry a pregnancy to term.”</div> <div style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><br /></div> <div style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Another concerned with the WHO definition of infertility is that it is based on being in a heterosexual relationship.According to this definition and many others like it, people can only be considered infertile if they engage in "regular unprotected sexual intercourse." This definition does not explicitly state that this it is referring to heterosexual intercourse, which is problematic. Given the narrow scope of this definition, how then should we diagnose infertility in lesbian and gay couples and heterosexual individuals who are singleand not engaging in regular unprotected sexual intercourse.</div> <div><br /></div> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="http://www.amc.edu/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"> </span></p>
April 19, 2015

/hiatus

Almost 3 years ago I took a break from blogging. Well now I’m back.

I started PopBioethics for a simple reason: all these obscure, difficult ethical principles kept showing up in my day-to-day life. I couldn’t play a video game or watch a movie without bioethics showing up somehow.

Bioethics is still everywhere. [...]

April 18, 2015

Taking Care of Nana

According to the Center for Disease Control, the United States has reached an unprecedented time in its history: Americans aged 65 years or older will double in the next 25 years to over 72 million of the US population, accounting for roughly 20% of said population by 2030.[1] As Americans age the cost of medical and health care continues to rise.[2] Coupled with this is... // Read More »
April 17, 2015

Bad Behaviour by Pharma, and Unforeseen Consequences

This is a must-read for anyone interested in the ethics of drug development and clinical trials. It explores how genuinely bad behaviour on the part of pharmaceutical companies can lead to overreaction by journalists and the public, sometimes with tragic consequences. By Matthew Herper, writing for Forbes.com: How Marketing And Media Muddled The Truth About […]
April 16, 2015

Current Trends in End-of-Life Medical Treatment (MP3)

This week, I am visiting Southern Illinois University as the John and Marsha Ryan Bioethicist in Residence.  I did two talks in Carbondale and am doing another in Springfield.   I also talked to the local NPR station, about current trends in...
April 16, 2015

Current Trends in End-of-Life Medical Treatment (MP3)

This week, I am visiting Southern Illinois University as the John and Marsha Ryan Bioethicist in Residence.  I did two talks in Carbondale and am doing another in Springfield.   I also talked to the local NPR station, about current trends in...
April 16, 2015

Patients without Surrogates - Twitter Chat

Check this out on Monday night.  Decision making for the unbefriended is the biggest bioethics issue that too few are talking about.
April 16, 2015

A Drive-By Shot at the Concept of “Liberal Neutrality”

A couple of writings by Gregory Kaebnick, the editor of the Hastings Center Report, have my attention these days, and I hope to deal with them in my next few posts.  For the moment, I intend to seize on one point he makes in “Engineered Microbes in Industry and Science,” his chapter in a book he co-edited with Thomas Murray, 2013’s Synthetic Biology and Morality. ... // Read More »
April 16, 2015

Watch Out for Snack Food

People are correctly paying a great deal of attention to just how many calories it is possible to consume at American restaurants these days. The New York Times, in fact, recently showed just how many calories people typically consume at … Continue reading

The post Watch Out for Snack Food appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

April 16, 2015

Gonzales vs. Oregon

<p style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">We are always pleased to support the activities of young scholars who are interested in bioethics. <a href="http://www.tiki-toki.com/timeline/entry/440733/Gonzales-v.-Oregon/">This link</a> is a timeline of the Supreme Court case Gonzales vs. Oregon. It was prepared by Ms. Maggie Kirby who attends high school at U-32 in Vermont. It does a terrific job of documenting this important bioethics case and binging awareness to the ongoing debate about physician-assisted suicide. Great work Maggie! </p> <p style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><strong style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px; color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="http://www.amc.edu/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong><span style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px; color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;"> </span></p>