Hot Topics: Health Disparities

Blog Posts (68)

August 28, 2018

Fear of Practitioner Bias and Confidentiality Breaches are Barriers to HIV Prevention among Transgender Youth, Study Finds

Celia B. Fisher, PhD, Director of Fordham University’s Center of Ethics and Education, explores transgender youth healthcare and HIV prevention in a recently published article titled:  Perceived Barriers to HIV Prevention Services for Transgender Youth. The article, published in the journal LGBT Health, examines the perceptions that transgender youth have of primary care providers, specifically […]
August 28, 2018

Fear of Practitioner Bias and Confidentiality Breaches are Barriers to HIV Prevention among Transgender Youth, Study Finds

Celia B. Fisher, PhD, Director of Fordham University’s Center of Ethics and Education, explores transgender youth healthcare and HIV prevention in a recently published article titled:  Perceived Barriers to HIV Prevention Services for Transgender Youth. The article, published in the journal LGBT Health, examines the perceptions that transgender youth have of primary care providers, specifically […]
August 7, 2018

Popular Insurance Pre-Existing Conditions Ban Under Threat

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Do you have pre-existing health conditions? Approximately 23 percent of Americans do.

According to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, a pre-existing condition is “a medical condition that occurred before a program of health benefits went into effect.

April 25, 2018

Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher on Patient-Provider Communications with Gay Teens

Fordham University’s Celia Fisher, PhD was the Principal Investigator on a recently completed quantitative study that resulted in a paper published in the journal AIDS and Behavior titled “Patient-Provider Communication Barriers and Facilitators to HIV and STI Preventive Services for Adolescent MSM.” The purpose of this study was to explore adolescent men who have sex with men (AMSM) […]
April 17, 2018

The End is Nigh: Bioethics and Antibiotic Resistance

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

 ‘We’re out of Options’: Doctors Battle Drug-Resistant Typhoid Outbreak – 13 April 2018

New Concerns Over ‘Super Gonorrhea’ That’s Resistant to All Drugs – 4 April 2018

‘Nightmare’ bacteria, resistant to almost every drug, stalk U.S.

April 11, 2018

White Privilege & Playing It Safe

by Denise M. Dudzinski, PhD MTS

In March of 2016 AJOB published an article, Bioethicists Can and Should Contribute to Addressing Racism.…

March 22, 2018

BioethicsTV (March 19-23): The Good Doctor, The Resident, Chicago Med

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Good Doctor (Season 1; Episode 17): Cost of healthcare, stealing identities, dating patients; The Resident (Season 1; Episode 8): Patient Dumping; Chicago Med (Season 3; Episode 12): Pedophilia; Cherry-picking; ECMO; teenage pregnancy

The Good Doctor (Season 1; Episode 17): Cost of healthcare, stealing identities, dating patients

In the first storyline,  a patient, “Lucy,” comes to the ER with a post-op infection: She never filled her antibiotic prescription.…

January 23, 2018

BioethicsTV (January 21-22, 2018): The Resident-Our Most Unethical Hospital System

The Resident (Season 1; Episode 1): The Most Unethical Hospital Ever

This new Fox show begins with newly minted MD Devon Pravesh’s first day at a fictional Atlanta hospital.…

January 16, 2018

Black Women are Dying in Disproportionate Numbers During and After Giving Birth and not even Celebrity Serena Williams is Safe

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

In a previous blog I wrote about racial disparities in health and health care in which black patients fare much worse than white patients, including worse health outcomes.…

January 9, 2018

Blindness Cure Is Out of Sight

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The FDA has approved the world’s first gene therapy: Luxturna (voretigene neparvovec; AAV2-hRPE65v2) is a one-time intervention that can treat an inherited retinal disease (RPE65-mediated inherited retinal dystrophy).…

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Published Articles (21)

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 18 Issue 3 - Sep 2018

Punishing Intentions and Neurointerventions David Birks & Alena Buyx

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 18 Issue 3 - Sep 2018

Neurointerventions: Punishment, Mental Integrity, and Intentions Peter Vallentyne

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 7 - Jul 2018

Uterus Transplantation: The Ethics of Using Deceased Versus Living Donors Bethany Bruno & Kavita Shah Arora

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

White Privilege and Playing It Safe Denise M. Dudzinski

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 5 - May 2018

Why Bioethics Should Be Concerned With Medically Unexplained Symptoms Diane O'Leary

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 5 - May 2018

What's in a Name? The Ethical Importance of Respecting a Patient's “Unexplained” Medical Concerns Kayhan Parsi & Nanette Elster

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

Same behavior, different provider: American medical students' attitudes toward reporting risky behaviors committed by doctors, nurses, and classmates Sahil Aggarwal & Aaron Kheriaty

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 3 - Mar 2018

Ethical Dilemmas in Protecting Susceptible Subpopulations From Environmental Health Risks: Liberty, Utility, Fairness, and Accountability for Reasonableness David B. Resnik, D. Robert MacDougall & Elise M. Smith

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 11 - Nov 2017

The Rescinding of DACA: What Should Healthcare Professionals and Academics Do? (and Why?) Mark G. Kuczewski & Danish Zaidi

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

Now is the Time for a Postracial Medicine: Biomedical Research, the National Institutes of Health, and the Perpetuation of Scientific Racism Javier Perez-Rodriguez & Alejandro de la Fuente

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News (119)

October 3, 2018 6:00 pm

Race, Ancestry, and Medical Research (JAMA)

The discussion of race and medicine in the United States is challenging and emotionally charged. Substantial disparities in health outcomes, based on race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, continue to exist; additional reports of racial bias and profound insensitivity in research continue to emerge in the popular media. A renewed discussion of race as a biological vs social construct has begun and is complicated by emerging data on genetics, race, and ancestry.

October 2, 2018 3:47 pm

AAMC Statement on Proposed Changes to Public Charge Rule (AAMC)

The AAMC issued a statement on the Department of Homeland Security’s proposed changes to how and whether immigrants can be classified as a public charge. “The AAMC and the nation’s medical schools and teaching hospitals are opposed to any policy that discourages people from pursuing medical care to which they are legally entitled. The proposed new rule would create a system where individuals are penalized for using health programs for which they legally qualify and could cause them to forgo crucial medical care, bringing with it all the health consequences that could follow. Teaching hospitals treat a disproportionate share of Medicaid patients, and we know from firsthand experience that access to care is key to ensuring that the nation’s patients have the stability and continuity of care that leads to better health outcomes,” said AAMC President and CEO Darrell G. Kirch, MD.
September 11, 2018 9:00 am

23andMe may offer costly premium DNA spit-test service (Mercury News)

Mountain View spit-kit DNA testing firm 23andMe wants to know how deep you want to go into your genome, and how much you’re willing to pay. The company currently sells $100 ancestry tests and $200 tests that cover ancestry and health. But according to a new report, 23andMe has been market-testing a deeper dive into personal genetics.

August 8, 2018 9:00 am

These tiny, stretchy speakers and microphones let your skin play music (Science)

If you’re prone to forgetting your headphones, new wearable technology that could turn your skin into a speaker should be music to your ears. Created in part to help the hearing and speech impaired, the new “smart skin” could be embedded into the ears—or into a patch on the throat. A similar device, described in the same study, acts as a microphone, which can be connected to smartphones and computers to unlock voice-activated security systems.

July 2, 2018 7:41 am

Federal Judge Blocks Medicaid Work Requirements In Kentucky (NPR)

A federal judge has blocked work requirements for Medicaid patients in Kentucky, just days before new rules mandated by Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration were set to go into effect.

June 21, 2018 8:55 am

A Pediatrician Reports Back From A Visit To A Children's Shelter Near The Border (NPR)

Nearly 2,000 immigrant children were separated from their parents after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border unlawfully this spring, according to the Department of Homeland Security. Many pediatricians have expressed concerns about the effects this traumatic event could have on those children. Dr. Colleen Kraft, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, visited a shelter in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley where some of these children are held. She spoke with All Things Considered’s Audie Cornish about that visit on Monday. She said she’s concerned that the stress the children are going through will have long-term health effects.

June 7, 2018 9:00 am

What Explains The Rising Overdose Rate Among Latinos? (NPR)

Opioid overdose deaths among Latinos are surging nationwide as well. While the overall death toll is still higher for whites, it’s increasing faster for Latinos and blacks, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Latino fatalities increased 52.5 percent between 2014 and 2016 as compared to 45.8 percent for whites. (Statisticians say counts for Hispanics are typically underestimated by 3 to 5 percent.) The most substantial hike was among blacks — 83.9 percent.

June 6, 2018 9:00 am

To be herself, she needs to change her body. But first, comes the battle with insurers (CNN)

The Trump administration has signaled its intention in recent months to rewrite a federal rule that bars health care discrimination based on gender identity. In its current form, that rule is one of the precious few tools transgender patients have to fight insurance denials for various medical treatments and procedures that fall under the broad umbrella of gender-affirming or transition-related care. Even with the rule in place, Jasmine and four other patients in different states detailed protracted battles for coverage.

May 14, 2018 9:00 am

Fewer African-Americans admitted to ICU for heart failure receive cardiologist care (Reuters)

African-Americans have a higher risk of heart failure and are more likely to die from heart failure than other races, but they are less likely to receive advanced therapies for heart failure.

October 18, 2017 9:00 am

Polluted environments kill 1.7 million children each year, WHO says (CNN)

Each year, environmental pollutants cost an estimated 1.7 million lives among children under 5, according to World Health Organization reports released Monday.

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