Hot Topics: Health Disparities

Blog Posts (39)

October 18, 2016

Fordham Study Addresses Health Care of Bisexual Adolescent Girls

For bisexual female adolescents,  proper sexual healthcare is difficult to obtain due to healthcare providers’ judgmental attitudes and assumptions of patient heterosexuality, and lack of opportunities for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI) testing. Additionally, youth openness with healthcare providers is restricted due … Continue reading
October 14, 2016

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: October 14, 2016

Health Care and Bioethics DNA database highlights need for new medical privacy protections Creation of a national repository of genetic information is seen by some as crucial to reducing medical costs and improving people’s healthcare. ‘Big data’ could mean big … Continue reading
September 29, 2016

Stop Price Gouging Sick People

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

More and more frequently, stories are appearing of drug companies buying patents of investment firms buying drug companies and then raising the cost dramatically.…

September 26, 2016

Response to “Do the EPA Studies Violate Do No Harm & Informed Consent”

by Nancy King, JD

I have just read your August 25 post on the EPA studies. While, I do not know that much about these particular exposure studies, I do know that EPA is taking the inquiry very seriously.…

September 14, 2016

Fordham’s Dr. Elizabeth Yuko Address Ethics of Web Self-Diagnoses

Millions of people use websites like WebMD every day to gain insight on a range of medical issues from cancer to mental health. This practice, or “cyberchondria,” is a new digital phenomenon that has resulted from online databases of free, … Continue reading
September 9, 2016

Medical Training for Transgender Patients Needs to Include Sensitivity to Social Stigmas for both Gender and Sexual Orientation

The recently published article on doctor’s lack of expertise in treating transgender patients in The Guardian is an important step forward in highlighting current disparities in healthcare services for this population.  The study, based on interviews with sample of 23 physicians and … Continue reading
September 8, 2016

Fordham RETI Fellow Addresses Stigma for HIV-Positive Gay and Bisexual Men

The minority stress theory suggests that health disparities experienced by gay and bisexual men (GBM) and other sexual minorities can be explained in terms of stigma-related stressors such as discrimination at work, school, religious institutions, communities and families. The unique … Continue reading
August 30, 2016

Will Research on 10,000 New Yorkers Fuel Future Racial Health Inequality?

By Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D. A 20-year, multi-million dollar study of more than 10,000 New Yorkers scheduled to begin next year claims that it will enable the development of theories, therapeutics, and policies to improve the health and quality of … Continue reading
August 11, 2016

RETI Fellow Examines Intersectional Stigma for HIV-Positive African American Women

While bearing the disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDs in the US, African American women also face multilevel stigma at social, community and institutional levels, which is exacerbated by their HIV-positive status. Fordham University Center for Ethics Education HIV and Drug Abuse … Continue reading
July 13, 2016

Where’s the Social Justice?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Picking up a newspaper or clicking to your favorite news site could lead one to believe that the U.S.…

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Published Articles (9)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

The Ethics of Organ Donor Registration Policies: Nudges and Respect for Autonomy Douglas MacKay & Alexandra Robinson

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

Autonomy by Default Cass R. Sunstein

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 6 - Jun 2016

Clinical Trials Infrastructure as a Quality Improvement Intervention in Low- and Middle-Income Countries Avram Denburg, Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo & Steven Joffe

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 6 - Jun 2016

The Potential for Infrastructure Benefits and the Responsiveness Requirement David Wendler

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 3 - Mar 2015

The Social Determinants of Health: Why Should We Care? Adina Preda & Kristin Voigt

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 7 - Jul 2014

The Principle of Equivalence Reconsidered: Assessing the Relevance of the Principle of Equivalence in Prison Medicine Fabrice Jotterand & Tenzin Wangmo

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 7 - Jul 2014

Observations on the Nature and Extent of Injustice in the American Prison System Ben A. Rich

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 5 - May 2014

Ethical Conditions for Transnational Gestational Surrogacy in Asia Darryl Macer

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 2 - Feb 2014

Ethical Review of Health Systems Research in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Conceptual Exploration Adnan A. Hyder, Abbas Rattani, Carleigh Krubiner, Abdulgafoor M. Bachani & Nhan T. Tran

News (91)

October 19, 2016 8:00 am

The drug industry’s answer to opioid addiction: More pills (Washington Post)

Cancer patients taking high doses of opioid painkillers are often afflicted by a new discomfort: constipation. Researcher Jonathan Moss thought he could help, but no drug company was interested in his ideas for relieving suffering among the dying.

October 5, 2016 8:00 am

How We Got Here: Treating Addiction In 28 Days (NPR)

Louis Casanova is playing cards with a friend on the back deck of a recovery house in Philadelphia’s northern suburbs.

October 3, 2016 8:00 am

Furor Over Drug Prices Puts Patient Advocacy Groups in Bind (NY Times)

Public anger over the cost of drugs has burned hot for a year, coursing through social media, popping up on the presidential campaign, and erupting in a series of congressional hearings, including one last week over the rising price of the allergy treatment EpiPen.

September 29, 2016 8:00 am

Depression, daily stressors and inflammatory responses to high-fat meals: when stress overrides healthier food choices (Nature)

Depression, stress and diet can all alter inflammation. This double-blind, randomized crossover study addressed the impact of daily stressors and a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) on inflammatory responses to high-fat meals. During two separate 9.5 h admissions, 58 healthy women (38 breast cancer survivors and 20 demographically similar controls), mean age 53.1 years, received either a high saturated fat meal or a high oleic sunflower oil meal. The Daily Inventory of Stressful Events assessed prior day stressors and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV evaluated MDD. As expected, for a woman with no prior day stressors, C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) were higher following the saturated fat meal than the high oleic sunflower oil meal after controlling for pre-meal measures, age, trunk fat and physical activity. But if a woman had prior day stressors, these meal-related differences disappeared—because the stressors heightened CRP, SAA, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 responses to the sunflower oil meal, making it look more like the responses to the saturated fat meal. In addition, women with an MDD history had higher post-meal blood pressure responses than those without a similar history. These data show how recent stressors and an MDD history can reverberate through metabolic alterations, promoting inflammatory and atherogenic responses.

September 26, 2016 5:48 pm

Too Poor for Proper Plumbing: A Reality in 500,000 U.S. Homes (NY Times)

TYLER, Ala. — The hard clay soil in this rural Southern county has twice cursed Dorothy Rudolph. It is good for growing cotton and cucumbers, the crops she worked as a child and hated. And it is bad for burying things — in particular, septic tanks.

September 23, 2016 8:00 am

Researchers Confront an Epidemic of Loneliness (NY Times)

The woman on the other end of the phone spoke lightheartedly of spring and of her 81st birthday the previous week. “Who did you celebrate with, Beryl?” asked Alison, whose job was to offer a kind ear. “No one, I…” And with that, Beryl’s cheer turned to despair.

August 24, 2016 8:10 am

How Japan Is Dealing With Impacts Of Supporting The Oldest Population In The World (NPR)

Nearly 27 percent of the people in the country are 65 or older. NPR’s Ina Jaffe visited Japan and tells Rachel Martin what she learned about why the population is aging.

August 22, 2016 8:00 am

Justice Department says it will end use of private prisons (Washington Post)

The Justice Department plans to end its use of private prisons after officials concluded the facilities are both less safe and less effective at providing correctional services than those run by the government.

July 25, 2016 5:04 am

The HIV Trap: A Woman's Lack Of Control (NPR)

When you’re pregnant, going to the doctors can be exciting. You get to find out if you’re having a boy or a girl. Maybe hear the baby’s heart beat. But in southern Africa, many women find out something else.

July 19, 2016 8:26 am

Medicine is failing obese people (Vox)

Watching a person die from cardiac arrest in an intensive care unit is devastating. It’s especially so when the person is a woman in her 40s who has been smothered to death by her own weight — and we doctors can do nothing to save her.

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