Hot Topics: Health Disparities

Blog Posts (25)

April 27, 2016

The Paradigm of the Paradox: Women, Pregnant Women, and the Unequal Burdens of the Zika Virus Pandemic

by Lisa H. Harris, Neil S. Silverman, and Mary Faith Marshall

The inequalities of outcome are, by and large, biological reflections of social fault lines (Paul Farmer)

Three paradoxes characterize the Zika virus pandemic and clinical and policy responses to it:

  1. Zika virus has been shown to cause severe developmental anomalies in the fetuses of infected women.
April 12, 2016

Social determinants: Why are they so difficult to address?

“He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that.” John Stuart Mill, On Liberty. 1869 By Greg Gruener At a lecture I recently attended with our students, the guest speaker’s topic was on health disparities and the data presented was, as most of us in the healthcare field know, pretty […]
March 30, 2016

What can celebrities do for bioethics?

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Television, film, theater, sports, and music celebrities (and other famous people who only seem to be famous for being famous) capture the public’s attention with tales of the celebrity lives and the perks and downfalls that come with being a public figure.…

March 1, 2016

Code Black Ends the Season on Bioethics

BioethicsTV is an occasional bioethics.net feature where we examine bioethical issues raised in televised medical dramas.

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The season finale of Code Black (season 1; episode 18 – February 24, 2016) presented a plethora of ethical challenges for the hard working doctors and nurses of Angels Memorial Hospital’s emergency department.…

January 5, 2016

Imposter Syndrome

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

As a junior scholar, Imposter Syndrome is as a part of my daily life as some people’s morning coffee is a part of their morning routine.…

December 11, 2015

The Increasing Divide: How Do We Improve Health In a Stratifying Society?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

While editing a book chapter dealing with public health, I came across the author talking about inequalities in health.…

October 6, 2015

State of the Armed Union

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D

In the first 274 days of 2015, there were 294 mass shootings (yes, that is more than 1 per day).…

June 22, 2015

Reflections on Father’s Day from a “Single” Mother

by Nanette Elster, JD, MPH

Today on Father’s Day, as I miss my own father who has been gone for 17 years now, I am reflecting on my decision to intentionally become a single mother.…

June 8, 2015

MERS: Another Lesson in Quarantine and Health Disparity

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

At the G7 meeting this week, the developed nations which compose the Group of 7 pledged to “wipe out Ebola.” With over 11,000 Ebola-related deaths worldwide since March 2014, this certainly is worth public health efforts and funding.…

May 4, 2015

A Case for Viewing The Baltimore Protests as a Bioethics Issue

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Freddie Gray’s Death
On April 12, 2015, Freddie Gray, a twenty-five year old black man was arrested and placed in a police van in Baltimore, Maryland for carrying a switchblade (Baltimore State Attorney, Marilyn Mosby later announced that Gray was legally carrying a knife).…

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Published Articles (5)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 3 - Mar 2015

The Social Determinants of Health: Why Should We Care? Adina Preda & Kristin Voigt

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 7 - Jul 2014

The Principle of Equivalence Reconsidered: Assessing the Relevance of the Principle of Equivalence in Prison Medicine Fabrice Jotterand & Tenzin Wangmo

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 7 - Jul 2014

Observations on the Nature and Extent of Injustice in the American Prison System Ben A. Rich

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 5 - May 2014

Ethical Conditions for Transnational Gestational Surrogacy in Asia Darryl Macer

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 2 - Feb 2014

Ethical Review of Health Systems Research in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Conceptual Exploration Adnan A. Hyder, Abbas Rattani, Carleigh Krubiner, Abdulgafoor M. Bachani & Nhan T. Tran

News (75)

April 5, 2016 10:11 am

The disturbing reason some African American patients may be undertreated for pain

African Americans are routinely under-treated for their pain compared with whites, according to research. A study released Monday sheds some disturbing light on why that might be the case.

March 8, 2016 12:51 pm

No Paid Sick Leave Means Workers Skip Medical Care

U.S. workers without paid sick leave are more likely to keep going to work when they’re sick and to forgo medical care for themselves and their families, compared to workers who do get paid for sick days, according to a new study.

October 12, 2015 3:52 pm

Exclusive - Transatlantic divide: how U.S. pays three times more for drugs

U.S. prices for the world’s 20 top-selling medicines are, on average, three times higher than in Britain, according to an analysis carried out for Reuters.

September 24, 2015 1:02 pm

Black patients fare better than whites when both get same healthcare, study finds

A nine-year study of more than 3 million veterans found that when black patients and white patients received the same level of healthcare, blacks fared better than whites.

September 16, 2015 4:01 pm

Poverty may increase odds of repeat hospitalizations

When patients are hospitalized more than once in the same month, it may have more to do with their income or education levels than the quality of care they received, a U.S. study suggests.

September 3, 2015 3:42 pm

U.S. government to extend healthcare nondiscrimination law to transgender people

The U.S. government said on Thursday it will extend its healthcare nondiscrimination law to transgender individuals and require health insurers and medical providers to treat all patients equally, regardless of sex.

July 20, 2015 5:02 pm

Effect of poverty on brains may explain poor kids' lower test scores

The effect of poverty on children’s brains may explain why poor youngsters tend to score lower on standardized tests compared to wealthier students, a new study suggests.

March 11, 2015 6:29 pm

Online offers of personalized cancer medicine may not be trustworthy

Tumor tests, genetic risk analyses and other products or services sold online as personalized cancer medicine are often not backed by evidence, according to a new U.S. study.

February 24, 2015 6:29 pm

World's diet worsening with globalization, major study finds: TRFN

The world’s diet has deteriorated substantially in the last two decades, a leading nutrition expert said on Monday, citing one of the largest studies available on international eating habits.

November 10, 2014 2:35 pm

A Plan to Cut Costs and Crime: End Hurdle to Job After Prison

James White had steeled himself for the moment. But when he got to the question on the job application — Have you ever been convicted of a crime? — he shifted nervously in his seat.

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