Hot Topics: Informed Consent

Blog Posts (21)

August 4, 2015

The Stanford Prison Experiment film: An Essential Teaching Tool

By Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In teaching research ethics, there are a few “classic cases” that we offer students as examples of where human subject research went wrong: Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis, the Nazi medical experiments, Willowbrook Hepatitis Experiments, human radiation experiments, and (now) the Guatemala syphilis study, among others.…

July 27, 2015

Investigating Two Claims Against Planned Parenthood: Center of Medical Progress’s Secret Videos

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Before you being reading, I have a disclaimer: Growing up, my mother worked for Planned Parenthood. As a nurse, she practiced in their clinics offering well women services, counseling, and contraception.…

June 15, 2015

Welcoming the Concept of Alief to Medical Ethics

Welcoming the Concept of Alief to Medical Ethics

 by J.S. Blumenthal-Barby, Ph.D.

Philosopher Tamar Gendler has introduced (circa 2008) a new concept in the philosophical literature that could be of interest to medical ethicists.…

March 26, 2015

Research 2.0: Rise of the Citizen-Scientist and the Death of Privacy

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

On Monday I attended a symposium on inter-professional education. During a session on new technologies in medicine (telemedicine, wearables, and mobile devices) I brought up the question of preserving privacy.…

January 13, 2015

Of Course 23andMe’s Plan Has Been to Sell Your Genetic Data All Along

[Gizmodo] Today, 23andMe announced what Forbes reports is only the first of ten deals with big biotech companies: Genentech will pay up to $60 million for access to 23andMe’s data to study Parki nson’s. You think 23andMe was about selling fun DNA spit tests for $99 a pop? Nope, it’s been about selling your data all along. Since 23andMe started in […]
September 24, 2014

Sophie’s Choice: Can Machines Do Any Better?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the 1979 novel Sophie’s Choice by William Styron, the reader meets a Holocaust survivor who was forced in the camps to choose which of her two children would die immediately.…

September 2, 2014

Big Data Peeps At Your Medical Records To Find Drug Problems

[NPR] No one likes it when a new drug in people’s medicine cabinets turns out to have problems — just remember the Vioxx debacle a decade ago, when the painkiller was removed from the market over concerns that it increased the risk of heart attack and stroke. To do a better job of spotting unforeseen risks […]
August 4, 2014

Do OkCupid and Facebook experiment on vulnerable populations?

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

A few months ago Facebook announced that some Facebook users were a part of a 2012 experiment.…

July 29, 2014


“But look, you found the notice, didn’t you?”

“Yes,” said Arthur. “yes I did. It was on display in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying ‘Beware of the Leopard.'”

                           –Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

Any apologia for Facebook’s recent behavioral study has to address one issue head on: that of informed consent.…

July 1, 2014

Enter the Corporate Congress: SCOTUS & FACEBOOK

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

One of the facts that hiring managers are taught is that you can never ask a potential employee about their religion (among other protected areas) unless the candidate brings it up.…

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Published Articles (10)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 10 - Oct 2015

Doctors, Patients, and Nudging in the Clinical Context—Four Views on Nudging and Informed Consent Thomas Ploug & Søren Holm

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 10 - Oct 2015

Placebo Effects and Informed Consent Mark Alfano

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 9 - Sep 2015

Broad Consent for Research With Biological Samples: Workshop Conclusions Christine Grady, Lisa Eckstein, Ben Berkman, Dan Brock, Robert Cook-Deegan, Stephanie M. Fullerton, Hank Greely, Mats G. Hansson, Sara Hull, Scott Kim, Bernie Lo, Rebecca Pentz, Laura Rodriguez, Carol Weil, Benjamin S. Wilfond & David Wendler

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 9 - Sep 2015

Prudentia Populo: Involving the Community in Biobank Governance Megan A. Allyse, Jennifer B. McCormick & Richard R. Sharp

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 3 - Mar 2014

The Ethics of Advertising for Health Care Services Yael Schenker, Robert M. Arnold & Alex John London

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

The Use of Deception in Public Health Behavioral Intervention Trials: A Case Study of Three Online Alcohol Trials Jim McCambridge, Kypros Kypri, Preben Bendtsen & John Porter

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 6 - Jun 2013

Nudging and Informed Consent Shlomo Cohen

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 4 Issue 2 - Apr 2013

Do Hospitalized Patients in a Nigerian Community Consider Informed Consent Necessary? Omokhoa Adedayo Adeleye & Ekaete Alice Tobin

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 4 - Apr 2013

Does Consent Bias Research? Mark A. Rothstein & Abigail B. Shoben

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 12 Issue 3 - Mar 2012

To Tell the Truth, the Whole Truth, May Do Patients Harm: The Problem of the Nocebo Effect for Informed Consent Rebecca Erwin Wells & Ted J. Kaptchuk

News (15)

March 9, 2015 6:28 pm

Seeing medical records might ease hospital patients’ confusion

Letting patients see their medical records while they’re in the hospital might ease worry and confusion without extra work for doctors and nurses, a small study suggests.

August 20, 2014 4:21 pm

California lawmakers pass bill banning inmate sterilizations

California lawmakers sent a bill to ban sterilization surgeries on inmates in California prisons to Governor Jerry Brown on Tuesday, after media reports and a later audit showed officials failed to follow the state’s rules for obtaining consent for the procedure known as tubal ligation from incarcerated women.

April 23, 2014 1:46 pm

Would you share your DNA info to advance medicine?

The provocative question of how “big data” will affect medicine and patient privacy is getting a lot of attention at the National Institutes of Health.

December 20, 2013 1:58 pm

The Supreme Court’s terrible—and dangerous—ruling this week on the Fifth Amendment.

On Monday, in a case called Salinas v. Texas that hasn’t gotten the attention it deserves, the Supreme Court held that you remain silent at your peril. The court said that this is true even before you’re arrested, when the police are just informally asking questions.

September 27, 2013 2:22 pm

Pennsylvania law gives patients the right to ask doctors about care

The Pennsylvania’s Medical Care Availability and Reduction of Error Act specifically gives patients the right to ask questions of physicians, not just physician assistants or nurses.

August 27, 2013 1:03 pm

UC Davis surgeons resign after bacteria-in-brain dispute

Two UC Davis neurosurgeons who intentionally infected three brain-cancer patients with bowel bacteria have resigned their posts after the university found they had “deliberately circumvented” internal policies.  The surgeons maintain they were acting in the best interests of their desperately ill patients, whose prognoses for survival were poor.

August 14, 2013 6:32 pm

Electronic Informed Consent: Will it Increase Patient Knowledge on Trials?

As the modernization of the informed consent process looks to keep patients better informed with electronic presentations of trial information, sponsors and CRO may also utilize the tech to track more data.

July 2, 2013 1:41 pm

Stop Worrying About Privacy, Start Caring About Identity

Informed consent and a change in privacy rules are what most people seem to be concerned about. However, data by itself is not intelligent. There are equal-parts rules and tools for data to become actionable information.

June 5, 2013 5:16 pm


A group of scholars and leaders in bioethics and pediatrics with extensive experience in ethical and regulatory issues in pediatrics and human subjects research urged the OHRP to withdraw its research violation notification to the institutions involved in SUPPORT.

May 21, 2013 2:37 pm

India: Audio-visual consent to become mandatory for clinical trials soon

In a landmark move in the sphere of clinical trials, informed consent of patients participating in clinical trials will soon be recorded on camera.

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