Hot Topics: Pediatrics

Blog Posts (56)

July 27, 2018

Fix Your Hearts, Not Their Parts

by Jenji Learn, MA

“Fix your hearts not our parts!”

”Autonomy, not surgery, my body belongs to ME!”

“Children have rights!”

Those were the pleas of the large gathering of Intersex people that assembled outside of Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago last Thursday, along with their families, friends, supporters, and Transex/Transgender allies, to voice their one, simple demand: “Stop mutilating us.…

July 1, 2018

A Few Words on the Saga of Jahi McMath

by James Zisfein, MD
A few words on the saga of Jahi McMath, the teenager who became brain dead from a surgical complication, whose family refused to accept that determination, and whose heart has stopped and is now dead by everyone’s definition:
The fact of McMath’s death over 4 years ago should not be in question.…
June 19, 2018

Trumps Willing Executioners: Why We Should Just Say No

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In 1996, Daniel Goldhagen published Hitler’s Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust, where he argued that most Germans were complicit in the Holocaust because anti-Semitism was a key part of national identity.…

June 19, 2018

Child abuse as immigration policy: has America lost its moral compass?

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

The President of the United States, after discussion with key aides in the White House, implemented a policy in June of 2018 allegedly aimed at discouraging illegal border crossings by asylum seekers and others from entering the United States.…

May 11, 2018

Family-Physician Conflict on Medical Treatment: The Charlie Gard and Alfie Evans Cases

by John J. Paris, SJ

The widely publicized conflicts between families and physicians over treatment decisions for profoundly compromised children in the recent Charlie Gard and Alfie Evans cases revive topics as old as the history of Western medicine on who should determine medical treatment and on what standard.…

May 8, 2018

Speaking to the Media about Antimicrobial Resistance: A Deeper Description of How I Wear Many Hats as a Bioethicist

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week, I was interviewed by an academic news serviceabout antimicrobial resistance (AMR) after a study reported that giving antibiotics to children in selected African towns led to a decreased mortality rate.  …

April 13, 2018

BioethicsTV (April 9-13): #ChicagoMed Saving one twin; faking a license; cost of care

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Lots of medical dramas were on hiatus this week but will be back.

Chicago Med (Season 1; Episode 15): Saving one twin; faking a license; cost of care

A set of conjoined twins comes to the ED with one of the twins in heart failure.…

April 10, 2018

DNA Testing for Baby’s IQ

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the 1997 film GATTACA, when a child is born, a reading of their DNA is done within minutes.…

March 9, 2018

BioethicsTV (March 5-9): #ChicagoMed, #GreysAnatomy-Vaccination & Medical Marijuana

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Chicago Med (Season 3; Episode 11): Harms of not vaccinating

An infant comes to the ED with a case of whooping cough.…

February 22, 2018

Artist's Note-March 2018

Original art and artist’s blurbs are presented in collaboration with the students of the University of Illinois Chicago program in Biomedical Visualization. 

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Published Articles (28)

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

Would you be willing to zap your child's brain? Public perspectives on parental responsibilities and the ethics of enhancing children with transcranial direct current stimulation Katy Wagner, Hannah Maslen, Justin Oakley & Julian Savulescu

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

Children's perspectives on the benefits and burdens of research participation Claudia Barned, Jennifer Dobson, Alain Stintzi, David Mack & Kieran C. O'Doherty

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 3 - Mar 2018

The Default Position: Optimizing Pediatric Participation in Medical Decision Making Aleksandra E. Olszewski & Sara F. Goldkind

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 3 - Mar 2018

Pediatric Participation in Medical Decision Making: Optimized or Personalized? Maya Sabatello, Annie Janvier, Eduard Verhagen, Wynne Morrison & John Lantos

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jan 2018

From “Longshot” to “Fantasy”: Obligations to Pediatric Patients and Families When Last-Ditch Medical Efforts Fail Elliott Mark Weiss & Autumn Fiester

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jan 2018

Managing Expectations: Delivering the Worst News in the Best Way? Alyssa M. Burgart & David Magnus

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 11 - Nov 2017

Reasons to Amplify the Role of Parental Permission in Pediatric Treatment Mark Christopher Navin & Jason Adam Wasserman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 11 - Nov 2017

To Whom Do Children Belong? John Lantos

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Sep 2017

A randomized study of a method for optimizing adolescent assent to biomedical research Robert D. Annett PhD, Janet L. Brody, David G. Scherer, Charles W. Turner, Jeanne Dalen & Hengameh Raissy

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Sep 2017

Moral conflict and competing duties in the initiation of a biomedical HIV prevention trial with minor adolescents Amelia S. Knopf , Amy Lewis Gilbert , Gregory D. Zimet, Bill G. Kapogiannis, Sybil G. Hosek, J. Dennis Fortenberry, Mary A. Ott & The Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions

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News (111)

July 24, 2018 4:44 am

Antidepressant prescriptions for children on the rise (BBC News)

Dr Bernadka Dubicka, who chairs the child and adolescent faculty at the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: “Currently only one in four children and young people are treated for their mental health problems. “The fact that prescriptions for antidepressants are rising could reflect a slow but steady move towards treating everyone who is unwell.

May 11, 2018 9:00 am

‘I saved them because I’m a superhero!’: 4-year-old donates bone marrow to his baby brothers (Washington Post)

The 4-year-old boy fancied himself a real-life superhero, wearing a blue T-shirt with photographs of his 4-month-old twin brothers, who were born with a rare immunodeficiency disease. Michael’s little brothers —  Santino, “Sonny,” and Giovanni, “Gio” — needed a bone-marrow transplant, and when his parents told him that he was a donor match, Michael told them that he wanted to save his brothers and would give them some of his.

May 7, 2018 9:00 am

Families of Children with Rare Diseases Fuel Gene Therapy Research (The Scientist)

It’s a compelling narrative: A parent learns that his or her child has a fatal disease with no cure, and, though not a scientist, embarks on a quest to find some treatment. Such stories have played out in the plotlines of films such as Lorenzo’s Oil and Extraordinary Measures, on national morning shows and local news segments, and on crowdfunding pages to drum up support for the cause.

April 25, 2018 4:34 pm

British toddler Alfie Evans not allowed to leave country, UK court says (CNN)

Alfie, admitted to Alder Hey Hospital in December 2016, was diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disease associated with severe epilepsy and has been in a semivegetative state for more than a year. During that time, he has been kept alive by artificial ventilation in the critical care unit.

April 3, 2018 9:00 am

Sudden infant death syndrome may have genetic basis, study suggests (CNN)

Sudden infant death syndrome — long regarded as an unexplained phenomenon affecting apparently healthy children under 1 — may have a genetic basis in some cases, a new study suggests. The study, published Wednesday in the journal The Lancet, found that a genetic mutation affecting respiratory muscle function was associated with SIDS in a subset of cases.

July 5, 2017 10:00 am

For Parents of U.K. Infant, Trump’s Tweet Is Latest Twist in an Agonizing Journey (The New York Times)

The long journey for Connie Yates and Chris Gard, whose infant son, Charlie, cannot breathe or move on his own, appeared to have come to an end last week. The courts had ruled that the baby’s rare genetic condition was incurable and that the only humane option was to take him off life support. The couple announced that they were getting ready “to say the final goodbye.” Then Pope Francis and President Trump weighed in, offering statements of support and thrusting a global spotlight onto a heart-rending case that has become a cause célèbre in Britain.

June 14, 2017 9:00 am

Heaven over hospital: Dying girl, age 5, makes a choice (CNN)

Julianna Snow is dying of an incurable disease. She’s stable at the moment, but any germ that comes her way, even just the common cold virus, could kill her. She’s told her parents that the next time this happens, she wants to die at home instead of going to the hospital for treatment. If Julianna were an adult, there would be no debate about her case: She would get to decide when to say “enough” to medical care and be allowed to die. But Julianna is 5 years old. Should her parents have let her know how grave her situation is? Should they have asked her about her end-of-life wishes? And now that those wishes are known, should her parents heed them?
January 20, 2017 9:00 am

How Science Is Helping Us Understand Gender (National Geographic)

A “neutral space” is a hard thing for a teenager to carve out: Biology has a habit of declaring itself eventually. Sometimes, though, biology can be put on hold for a while with puberty-blocking drugs that can buy time for gender-questioning children.

November 10, 2016 10:52 am

U.S. watchdog told Medicare, Medicaid that EpiPen was misclassified in 2009: senator (Reuters)

The internal watchdog at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services warned the office tasked with administering federal health insurance programs that Mylan NV’s EpiPen was improperly classified as a generic drug in 2009, Senator Charles Grassley said on Tuesday.

November 3, 2016 8:00 am

More Children Are Being Poisoned By Prescription Opioids (NPR)

Young children and teenagers are increasingly likely to be poisoned by opioid painkillers that are often prescribed for other family members, a study finds.

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