Hot Topics: Pediatrics

Blog Posts (62)

December 5, 2018

Ethical Guidelines for DNA testing in Migrant Family Reunification

This blog post will appear in a future issue of the American Journal of Bioethics

by Nita Farahany, JD, PhD; Saheel Chodavadia; and Sara H.

November 27, 2018

Birth of Twins from Embryo Editing Raise Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues

Updated November 28 at 8:30am EST

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The film GATTACA turned 20 years old this year. The premise of that film is a society where DNA is viewed as predictive of everything: Your intelligence, physical abilities, your health, even how long you will live.…

November 24, 2018

BioethicsTV (November 19-23, 2018): #TheResident, #TheGoodDoctor, #NewAmsterdam

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 8): Fraudulent medical devices; Unfinished stories; Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 8): Vaccination, Stories and Marital Counseling; Jump to New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 8): Undue influence; Cultural accommodation; overworked physicians

The Resident (Season 2; Episode 8): Fraudulent medical devices; Unfinished stories

Henry is a young boy who comes to the ED after he has a grand mal seizure on the little league field.…

October 12, 2018

BioethicsTV (October 8-12, 2018): #TheResident #TheGoodDoctor #ChicagoMed #GreysAnatomy

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“Exploring ethical issues in TV medical dramas”

Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 3): Saline shortage, pressure to bill; Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 3): Structural discrimination against women; surrogate decision-making; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 3): Best interest of a child; faith versus science; Jump to Grey’s Anatomy (Season 15; Episode 4): Fraud, assault, lies, and the ethics police

Medical dramas this week seemed to focus on two themes: 1.…

October 5, 2018

BioethicsTV (October 1-5)

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 2): Rising drug costs Jump to New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 2): Cultural accommodation; medicating schoolkids Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 2): Withholding support; withdrawing support

The Resident (Season 2; Episode 2): Rising drug costs

In its sophomore year, this show seems to be shying away from ethical issues and the gross incompetence of its fictional hospital and exchanging it for hope; hope that hospitals can cover their costs and meet patient needs.…

August 24, 2018

Best Interest, Harm, God’s Will, Parental Discretion, or Utility

This post also appears in the August 2018 issue of the American Journal of Bioethics.

by John D. Lantos, Ph.D

The impassioned and well-reasoned essays in this edition of the journal all agree with two claims: (1) children have moral claims that should be protected and recognized, and (2) we need ongoing discussions on how to determine and weigh the interests of children when we make decisions for them.…

July 27, 2018

Fix Your Hearts, Not Their Parts

by Jenji Learn, MA

“Fix your hearts not our parts!”

”Autonomy, not surgery, my body belongs to ME!”

“Children have rights!”

Those were the pleas of the large gathering of Intersex people that assembled outside of Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago last Thursday, along with their families, friends, supporters, and Transex/Transgender allies, to voice their one, simple demand: “Stop mutilating us.…

July 1, 2018

A Few Words on the Saga of Jahi McMath

by James Zisfein, MD
A few words on the saga of Jahi McMath, the teenager who became brain dead from a surgical complication, whose family refused to accept that determination, and whose heart has stopped and is now dead by everyone’s definition:
The fact of McMath’s death over 4 years ago should not be in question.…
June 19, 2018

Trumps Willing Executioners: Why We Should Just Say No

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In 1996, Daniel Goldhagen published Hitler’s Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust, where he argued that most Germans were complicit in the Holocaust because anti-Semitism was a key part of national identity.…

June 19, 2018

Child abuse as immigration policy: has America lost its moral compass?

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

The President of the United States, after discussion with key aides in the White House, implemented a policy in June of 2018 allegedly aimed at discouraging illegal border crossings by asylum seekers and others from entering the United States.…

View More Blog Entries

Published Articles (32)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 11 - Nov 2018

Just Policy? An Ethical Analysis of Early Intervention Policy Guidance Ibrahim Garba, Leila Barraza & Elizabeth Hall-Lipsy

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 8 - Aug 2018

When Parents Refuse: Resolving Entrenched Disagreements Between Parents and Clinicians in Situations of Uncertainty and Complexity Janine Penfield Winters

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 8 - Aug 2018

The Harm Principle Cannot Replace the Best Interest Standard: Problems With Using the Harm Principle for Medical Decision Making for Children Johan Christiaan Bester

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 8 - Aug 2018

Best Interest, Harm, God’s Will, Parental Discretion, or Utility John D. Lantos

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

Would you be willing to zap your child's brain? Public perspectives on parental responsibilities and the ethics of enhancing children with transcranial direct current stimulation Katy Wagner, Hannah Maslen, Justin Oakley & Julian Savulescu

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

Children's perspectives on the benefits and burdens of research participation Claudia Barned, Jennifer Dobson, Alain Stintzi, David Mack & Kieran C. O'Doherty

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 3 - Mar 2018

The Default Position: Optimizing Pediatric Participation in Medical Decision Making Aleksandra E. Olszewski & Sara F. Goldkind

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 3 - Mar 2018

Pediatric Participation in Medical Decision Making: Optimized or Personalized? Maya Sabatello, Annie Janvier, Eduard Verhagen, Wynne Morrison & John Lantos

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jan 2018

From “Longshot” to “Fantasy”: Obligations to Pediatric Patients and Families When Last-Ditch Medical Efforts Fail Elliott Mark Weiss & Autumn Fiester

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jan 2018

Managing Expectations: Delivering the Worst News in the Best Way? Alyssa M. Burgart & David Magnus

View More Articles

News (115)

November 21, 2018 9:51 am

How Do Wishes Granted To Very Sick Kids Affect Their Health? (National Public Radio)

The children granted wishes were substantially less likely to visit the emergency department or to have an unplanned hospital admission within two years as compared with children who hadn’t received wishes. (Researchers matched the children’s personal and disease characteristics in the study.)

“My hypothesis is that these kids, when they come back, are more engaged with their families and medical providers, and perhaps they’re more adherent to their treatment plan,” says the study’s lead author Dr. Anup D. Patel, section chief of neurology at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and an associate professor of pediatrics at Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus.

November 20, 2018 10:39 am

Adverse reactions to antibiotics land thousands of kids in the ER each year. What parents should know (The Washington Post)

Nearly 70,000 children end up in emergency rooms every year after experiencing adverse reactions to antibiotic drugs, according to an analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published in August in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

About 74 million antibiotic prescriptions are doled out to kids each year, the study notes, and past research has indicated that at least one-third of these pediatric antibiotic prescriptions are unnecessary.

November 19, 2018 9:00 am

New Peanut Allergy Drug Shows ‘Lifesaving’ Potential (The New York Times)

Results from a new study may lead to approval of what could be the first drug that ameliorates potentially deadly reactions in children with severe peanut allergies.

August 29, 2018 9:00 am

How 30 days with an in-home robot could help children with autism (Science)

For many children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), recognizing and responding to eye contact, body language, and tone of voice is a major challenge. Improving those social skills can take lots of work—putting a strain on caregivers with limited time, resources, and money for therapy. Now, a study shows that just 30 days with an in-home robot that provides social feedback can dramatically improve a child’s interactions with others.

July 24, 2018 4:44 am

Antidepressant prescriptions for children on the rise (BBC News)

Dr Bernadka Dubicka, who chairs the child and adolescent faculty at the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: “Currently only one in four children and young people are treated for their mental health problems. “The fact that prescriptions for antidepressants are rising could reflect a slow but steady move towards treating everyone who is unwell.

May 11, 2018 9:00 am

‘I saved them because I’m a superhero!’: 4-year-old donates bone marrow to his baby brothers (Washington Post)

The 4-year-old boy fancied himself a real-life superhero, wearing a blue T-shirt with photographs of his 4-month-old twin brothers, who were born with a rare immunodeficiency disease. Michael’s little brothers —  Santino, “Sonny,” and Giovanni, “Gio” — needed a bone-marrow transplant, and when his parents told him that he was a donor match, Michael told them that he wanted to save his brothers and would give them some of his.

May 7, 2018 9:00 am

Families of Children with Rare Diseases Fuel Gene Therapy Research (The Scientist)

It’s a compelling narrative: A parent learns that his or her child has a fatal disease with no cure, and, though not a scientist, embarks on a quest to find some treatment. Such stories have played out in the plotlines of films such as Lorenzo’s Oil and Extraordinary Measures, on national morning shows and local news segments, and on crowdfunding pages to drum up support for the cause.

April 25, 2018 4:34 pm

British toddler Alfie Evans not allowed to leave country, UK court says (CNN)

Alfie, admitted to Alder Hey Hospital in December 2016, was diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disease associated with severe epilepsy and has been in a semivegetative state for more than a year. During that time, he has been kept alive by artificial ventilation in the critical care unit.

April 3, 2018 9:00 am

Sudden infant death syndrome may have genetic basis, study suggests (CNN)

Sudden infant death syndrome — long regarded as an unexplained phenomenon affecting apparently healthy children under 1 — may have a genetic basis in some cases, a new study suggests. The study, published Wednesday in the journal The Lancet, found that a genetic mutation affecting respiratory muscle function was associated with SIDS in a subset of cases.

July 5, 2017 10:00 am

For Parents of U.K. Infant, Trump’s Tweet Is Latest Twist in an Agonizing Journey (The New York Times)

The long journey for Connie Yates and Chris Gard, whose infant son, Charlie, cannot breathe or move on his own, appeared to have come to an end last week. The courts had ruled that the baby’s rare genetic condition was incurable and that the only humane option was to take him off life support. The couple announced that they were getting ready “to say the final goodbye.” Then Pope Francis and President Trump weighed in, offering statements of support and thrusting a global spotlight onto a heart-rending case that has become a cause célèbre in Britain.

View More News Items