Hot Topics: Politics

Blog Posts (119)

February 21, 2017

Ethics, refugees, and the President’s Executive Order

by Nancy Kass, ScD
There are different political philosophies about the responsibilities of states regarding whether to accept refugees. While there is a political philosophy that might be called Nationalist in perspective that says, essentially, “Not my Problem,” the predominant philosophy globally is different.…

February 17, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: February 17, 2017

Politics Trump Ethics Monitor: Has The President Kept His Promises? To track Trump’s ethics-related promises, NPR checked debate transcripts, campaign speeches and press conferences Trump’s South Florida estate raises ethics questions Ethics questions and possible conflicts surrounding President Donald Trump’s frequent trips to his sprawling Mar-a-Lago property, especially in regards to the invitation of Japanese Prime … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: February 17, 2017
February 13, 2017

Fallout: From Healthcare Equality to Existential Threat

by Jenji Cassandra Learn

This is the second in a series of personal articles about living as a trans-woman facing insurance denial, discrimination, and medical mistreatment in the current political environment.

February 13, 2017

The Death of Aid-in-Dying in DC

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

I recently gave a talk to a local chapter of a national physicians’ health care group where I was talking about what end of life could look like under a single payer health care system.…

February 10, 2017

Stoking the Flames of Competitiveness on an Overheating Planet

STUDENT VOICES By: Michael Aprea This essay is in response to the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs video “Climate Protectionism and Competitiveness.”   Steam put the world in motion. It lit up the night, and tightened humanity’s grasp on the forces of nature. Nature, however, has eluded the human race and has forced civilization to reconsider … More Stoking the Flames of Competitiveness on an Overheating Planet
February 3, 2017

A Solution In Search of A Problem: Streamlining the FDA

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

A professional association for regulatory affairs posted an article on Wednesday reporting Trump’s comments “calling for a massive overhaul of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations.” Trump issued an executive that called for reducing the number of federal regulations (for each new one created, two must be retired).…

January 30, 2017

Bioethics and the Problem of Silent Neutrality in the age of Trump

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

One of the most contentious of all issues in bioethics has been whether as a profession, we should take a stand against issues.…

January 24, 2017

Can Science Survive in a Communications Blackout: Restricting Speech Violates Scientific Ethics

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

That good ethics begins with good facts is an oft-heard mantra and was my first lesson when I began conducting clinical ethics consults 20 years ago.…

January 11, 2017

Flatulence and Elections

Approximately once a month I open my schedule and see that my first task of the day is to write a post for the Alden March Bioethics Blog, Bioethics Today. The first part of this task is to determine what to write about. Sometimes that is the most difficult part of the job. I try to give myself fairly wide discretion in choice of topics but this is a bioethics blog so I do try to be conscientious about finding some relationship between the topic of the blog and bioethics. Sometimes that is hard. Recently while perusing the venerable Washington Post I came upon an article that I felt I had to write a blog about.

It also happened that today was the day that my calendar told me it was time to write a blog. So here goes.

It was reported today that there was a fire in the operating room April 15 during a surgical procedure. An unidentified woman was undergoing a surgical procedure on the cervix with a laser. To make a long story short, the woman passed gas, the laser ignited the flatulence and the surgical draping caught fire.

I was attracted to this article because I used to be a young boy (this was a very long time ago) and all young boys believe that everything about farts is funny and entertaining. It was even more entertaining when the flatulence was ignited. Alas when I first saw the article I thought it would be funny but it was not. The woman was seriously burned.  This no longer seemed like a good topic for a blog and I left it incompletely written and unpublished.

While this happened months ago it is current again. At least in my thinking it has become current. The reason for this is that sometimes things that start out seeming funny or absurd become serious issues. I admit that only months ago I thought that the fact that a certain individual was running for president was both funny and absurd. Now he has been elected and it seems neither funny nor absurd. It seems very serious indeed.

So now in my mind the presidential election process evokes thoughts of a woman who was seriously burned in a fire ignited by her own flatulence. I hope the nation and the world are not seriously burned by this election but I fear they will be.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

 

 

January 9, 2017

Crossing the Line: When Doctors’ Beliefs Endanger Patients’ Autonomy and Health

by Craig M. Klugman, Ph.D.

In 2016 the Illinois legislature passed and Governor Bruce Rauner signed into law Public Act 099-690 (SB 1564), an amendment to the Health Care Right of Conscience Act.…