Hot Topics: professional ethics

Blog Posts (54)

December 4, 2018

Should We Edit the Human Germline? Is Consensus Possible or Even Desirable?

I started writing this on my way back to New York from the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing, held in Hong Kong November 27 to 29, where the breaking news of the alleged world’s first birth of genetically edited babies loomed large. The surprising news both reinforced and undercut the summit’s goal to… Read more

The post Should We Edit the Human Germline? Is Consensus Possible or Even Desirable? appeared first on The Hastings Center.

November 24, 2018

BioethicsTV (November 19-23, 2018): #TheResident, #TheGoodDoctor, #NewAmsterdam

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 8): Fraudulent medical devices; Unfinished stories; Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 8): Vaccination, Stories and Marital Counseling; Jump to New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 8): Undue influence; Cultural accommodation; overworked physicians

The Resident (Season 2; Episode 8): Fraudulent medical devices; Unfinished stories

Henry is a young boy who comes to the ED after he has a grand mal seizure on the little league field.…

November 16, 2018

BioethicsTV (November 13-16): #TheGoodDoctor, #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 7): Directed donation; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 8): DNR Tattoos and Ethics Committees

As many of our favorite medical dramas head to their fall finales, they focused more on sentimental stories in the personal lives of characters, or feel good cases that did not raise any ethical issues.…

November 15, 2018

#InMyLane: Gun Violence and an Ethical Health Care Response

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Since January 1, 2018 through November 15, the United States has seen 311 mass shootings that have killed 339 people and injured 1,249.…

October 30, 2018

A Jewish Bioethicist Responds to Hate

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

 “Whoever kills a person [unjustly]…it is as though he has killed all mankind. And whoever saves a life, it is as though he had saved all mankind.” (Qur’an, 5:32)

When I was about 7 years old, my father was completing the newspaper crossword when he called me over to sit in his lap.…

September 20, 2018

Let the Sun Shine into the Medical Ivory Tower

In 2012, I coauthored a case report about the successful use of dietary supplements in treating a case of male infertility in the American Family Physician. Before it was published, I was surprised to receive a communication asking me to disclose the fact that I had written a textbook on dietary supplements. It had not… Read more

The post Let the Sun Shine into the Medical Ivory Tower appeared first on The Hastings Center.

September 19, 2018

Silence versus Bearing Witness: Response to Alan Stone

by Bandy X. Lee, MD, MDiv

Earlier this year, I was delighted to discover that Dr. Alan Stone had written a review of the book I edited: The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President, for the blog Lawfare.…

August 14, 2018

Is Japan Alone in Disadvantaging Female Medical School Applicants?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last December, I wrote a post about #MeToo in bioethics. I wish this could be a one-time topic and all of the problems were fixed, but alas this is a problem of structural inequality.…

July 31, 2018

Credentialing Exam is A Battle for Power and Soul of Bioethics

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Like most members of the American Society for Bioethics & Humanities (ASBH), I received an email last week geared toward enticing me to sign up to take the new Healthcare Ethics Consultant accreditation exam.…

July 24, 2018

Newspaper Op-Eds Should Disclose Authors’ Industry Ties

Earlier this month, The Seattle Times published an op-ed by Samuel Browd, medical director of Seattle Children’s Sport Concussion Program, on the risks of brain injury in youth sports. Dr. Browd acknowledged troubling research on the dangers of repetitive brain trauma, but also emphasized that millions of children “have played contact sports without overt symptoms” and… Read more

The post Newspaper Op-Eds Should Disclose Authors’ Industry Ties appeared first on The Hastings Center.

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Published Articles (22)

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 9 Issue 3 - Nov 2018

Conflicts of interest policies for authors, peer reviewers, and editors of bioethics journals Zubin Master, Kelly Werner, Elise Smith, David B. Resnik & Bryn Williams-Jones

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 9 Issue 3 - Nov 2018

Taking societal cost into clinical consideration: U.S. physicians’ views Alissa R. Stavig, Hyo Jung Tak, John D. Yoon & Farr A. Curlin

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 9 - Sep 2018

The Ethics of Smart Pills and Self-Acting Devices: Autonomy, Truth-Telling, and Trust at the Dawn of Digital Medicine Craig M. Klugman, Laura B. Dunn, Jack Schwartz & I. Glenn Cohen

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 7 - Jul 2018

“A Little ELF, Please?” The Electronic Long-Form COI Disclosure Statement (ELFCOI) Lisa Kearns & Arthur Caplan

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

Were the “Pioneer” Clinical Ethics Consultants “Outsiders”? For Them, Was “Critical Distance” That Critical? Bruce D. White, Wayne N. Shelton & Cassandra J. Rivais

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

Outsider/Insider Albert R. Jonsen

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

“Natural” Talents and Dedication—Meanings and Values in Sport Thomas H. Murray

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 9 Issue 2 - Jun 2018

How acceptable is paternalism? A survey-based study of clinician and nonclinician opinions on paternalistic decision making Kunal Bailoor, Thomas Valley, Chithra Perumalswami, Andrew G. Shuman, Raymond DeVries & Darin B. Zahuranec

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 5 - May 2018

Peering into the Future of Peer Review Kayhan Parsi & Nanette Elster

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

Same behavior, different provider: American medical students' attitudes toward reporting risky behaviors committed by doctors, nurses, and classmates Sahil Aggarwal & Aaron Kheriaty

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News (41)

December 11, 2018 9:15 am

What These Medical Journals Don’t Reveal: Top Doctors’ Ties to Industry (The New York Times)

The Sarah Cannon Research Institute, based in Nashville, received nearly $8 million in payments from drug companies on behalf of its president for clinical operations, Dr. Howard Burris, largely for research work. Dozens of his articles published in prestigious medical journals did not include the required disclosures of those payments and relationships.

November 30, 2018 11:59 am

China Halts Work by Scientist Who Says He Edited Babies’ Genes (New York Times)

BEIJING — China said on Thursday that it had suspended the work of a scientist who claims to have created the world’s first genetically edited babies, saying his conduct appeared to be unethical and in violation of Chinese law.

The scientist, He Jiankui, announced on Monday that he had used the gene-editing technique Crispr to alter embryos, which he implanted in the womb of a woman who gave birth to twin girls this month. At an international conference on Wednesday, he asserted that he was proud of what he had done.

November 26, 2018 12:42 pm

Chinese researcher claims first gene-edited babies (AP News)

A Chinese researcher claims that he helped make the world’s first genetically edited babies — twin girls born this month whose DNA he said he altered with a powerful new tool capable of rewriting the very blueprint of life.

If true, it would be a profound leap of science and ethics.

A U.S. scientist said he took part in the work in China, but this kind of gene editing is banned in the United States because the DNA changes can pass to future generations and it risks harming other genes.

October 2, 2018 3:39 pm

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Announces Conflict of Interest Task Force (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center )

The task force was announced in a statement from MSK President and Chief Executive Officer Craig Thompson, MD. It will be chaired by Debra Berns, MSK’s Senior Vice President and Chief Risk Officer.

September 24, 2018 9:00 am

Cornell nutrition scientist resigns after retractions and research misconduct finding (Science)

Brian Wansink, the Cornell University nutrition researcher known for probing the psychology behind human eating habits, has resigned after a university misconduct investigation, and following the retraction this week of six of his papers.

September 20, 2018 1:09 pm

California Sues AbbVie Over Alleged Arthritis Drug Kickbacks (Bloomberg)

California’s insurance regulator is suing AbbVie Inc., alleging that the pharmaceutical giant gave illegal kickbacks to health-care providers in order to keep patients on its blockbuster rheumatoid arthritis drug Humira.

September 19, 2018 9:00 am

Nearly 30 percent of patients prescribed opioids had no recorded pain diagnoses (PBS News)

Nearly 30 percent of U.S. patients prescribed opioids by doctors over the course of a decade had no recorded pain diagnosis, according to a new letter published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

September 17, 2018 12:00 pm

Medicine’s Financial Contamination (The New York Times)

The fall from grace last week of Dr. José Baselga, the former chief scientific officer of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, illuminated a longstanding problem of modern medicine: Potentially corrupting payments by drug and medical device makers to influential people at research hospitals are far more common than either side publicly acknowledges.

September 17, 2018 9:00 am

'Lots of lads I know wouldn't give it a shot': the men starting care careers (The Guardian)

Wilding is one of the small – but slowly growing – number of male care workers in the UK; men make up just 18% of the social care workforce – an increase of two percentage points since 2015… A staggering 85% of men, and 76% of men aged 16-25, say they are unlikely to start a career in adult social care, while 35% of the public think working in a care home is a “woman’s career”.

August 15, 2018 9:00 am

Psychologists keep policy on U.S. detainees, but issue remains open wound (Science)

The American Psychological Association (APA) in Washington, D.C., has decided to retain a policy banning military psychologists from working with detainees at the U.S. base in Guantanamo Bay in Cuba and other national security detention facilities. But the political machinations surrounding a decisive vote this week by APA’s governing body suggest the 115,000-member organization is still far from resolving a decadelong debate over the ethical rules of conduct for psychologists in the U.S. government’s ongoing war against terrorism.

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