Hot Topics: professional ethics

Blog Posts (12)

April 24, 2017

BioethicsTV: Henrietta Lacks and “Mary Kills People”

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

This past weekend was a bioethics bonanza when it came to cable television. First, HBO premiered its film version of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, seven years after the book’s original publication.…

March 31, 2017

BioethicsTV: Aggressive Treatment Chosen for Patients at the End of Life

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

This week’s Thursday night medical TV was all about end of life decision-making and delved into the questions of how much aggressive treatment is too much, what happens when physicians lose clinical distance, and who makes decisions for patients.…

March 22, 2017

Texas Considers Letting Doctors Lie to Patients

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Texas Senate just passed a new bill (SB 25) that would shield doctors from a lawsuit if a baby is born with a disability even if the doctor knew of the concern and chose not to tell the parents.…

February 24, 2017

Good facts, calm deliberation, and wise counsel

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored” – Aldous Huxley, Proper Studies (1927)

A recent exchange on the bioethics listserv began with a panicked message that the Presidential bioethics commissions website (bioethics.gov) has gone dark.…

January 30, 2017

Bioethics and the Problem of Silent Neutrality in the age of Trump

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

One of the most contentious of all issues in bioethics has been whether as a profession, we should take a stand against issues.…

January 19, 2017

Peer Reviewing: Paying it Forward

by Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD and Bela Fishbeyn, MS

As an associate editor and executive editor of the American Journal of Bioethics, we identify and recruit peer reviewers to review manuscripts that have been submitted for publication.…

January 11, 2017

The Cost of Being Whole: Double-Standards and Discrimination in Trans Healthcare

by Jenji C. Learn, BA

How much are your genitals worth to you? Your beard? Your breasts?

What’s a reasonable price for them?…

December 28, 2016

Doctor as Data Entry Drone

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Most people choose to go into the health professions to help others, to make a secure living, and to challenge themselves on a daily basis.…

October 31, 2016

Bioethics.net: The Presidential Election Edition

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Every four years the United States chooses a new chief executive. Although encoded in the Constitution, the idea that a person with such power would willingly surrender it and walk away to allow another to lead is remarkable.…

October 10, 2016

“Locker Room Talk” Does Matter Mr. Trump

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Over the last few days, a number of recordings have come to light showing Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump saying lewd, lascivious, and down right crass statements about women.…

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Published Articles (9)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 6 - Jun 2017

Bringing Transparency to Medicine: Exploring Physicians' Views and Experiences of the Sunshine Act Susan Chimonas, Nicholas J. DeVito & David J. Rothman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 6 - Jun 2017

Shining Light on Conflicts of Interest Craig Klugman

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

The interactions of Canadian ethics consultants with health care managers and governing boards during times of crisis Chris Kaposy, Victor Maddalena, Fern Brunger, Daryl Pullman & Richard Singleton

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

Primary care physicians' views about gatekeeping in clinical research recruitment: A qualitative study Marilys Guillemin, Rosalind McDougall, Dominique Martin, Nina Hallowell, Alison Brookes & Lynn Gillam

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

Qualitative study of participants' perceptions and preferences regarding research dissemination Rachel S. Purvis, Traci H. Abraham, Christopher R. Long, M. Kathryn Stewart, T. Scott Warmack & Pearl Anna McElfish

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 1 - Jan 2017

Tracking U.S. Professional Athletes: The Ethics of Biometric Technologies Katrina Karkazis & Jennifer R. Fishman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 12 - Dec 2016

A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress Stephen M. Campbell, Connie M. Ulrich & Christine Grady

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 12 - Dec 2016

Moral Distress in Clinical Ethics: Expanding the Concept Alyssa M. Burgart & Katherine E. Kruse

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 10 - Oct 2016

Healing Without Waging War: Beyond Military Metaphors in Medicine and HIV Cure Research Jing-Bao Nie, Adam Gilbertson, Malcolm de Roubaix, Ciara Staunton, Anton van Niekerk, Joseph D. Tucker & Stuart Rennie

News (12)

June 22, 2017 9:00 am

Strategies for Promoting High-Quality Care and Personal Resilience in Palliative Care (AMA Journal of Ethics)

Palliative care (PC) clinicians are faced with ever-expanding pressures, which can make it difficult to fulfill their duties to self and others and lead to moral distress.

June 21, 2017 9:00 am

China cracks down on fake peer reviews (Nature)

The Chinese government is going on the offensive against scientists who dupe journals by creating fraudulent reviews of submitted papers. A coalition of agencies led by the science ministry announced on 14 June that the government would suspend the grants of researchers involved in such fraud, which surfaced earlier this year when a cancer journal retracted 107 research papers from Chinese authors. And funding agencies in China promised to increase policing of the scientific community to prevent similar deceptions.

May 18, 2017 9:00 am

From Silence into Language: Questioning the Power of Physician Illness Narratives (AMA Journal of Ethics)

Physicians’ narratives of their own experiences of illness can be a kind of empathic bridge across the divide between a professional healer and a sick patient. This essay considers ways in which physicians’ narratives of their own and family members’ experiences of cancer shape encounters with patients and patients’ experiences of illness.

May 12, 2017 9:00 am

Integrity starts with the health of research groups (Nature)

Last month, the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine published a report called Fostering Integrity in Research. Later this month, the 5th World Conference on Research Integrity will be held in Amsterdam. Over the years, universities have followed some funders’ mandates to improve the prevention and investigation of misconduct. Many discussions have been held about unreliable research. None of these initiatives pays sufficient attention to a specific issue: the research health of research groups and the people who lead them. This includes technical robustness of lab practices, assurance of ethical integrity and the psychological health and well-being of group members.

April 28, 2017 9:00 am

Society labels harassment as research misconduct (Science)

April 18, 2017 1:10 pm

Self-taught artificial intelligence beats doctors at predicting heart attacks (Science)

Doctors have lots of tools for predicting a patient’s health. But—as even they will tell you—they’re no match for the complexity of the human body. Heart attacks in particular are hard to anticipate. Now, scientists have shown that computers capable of teaching themselves can perform even better than standard medical guidelines, significantly increasing prediction rates. If implemented, the new method could save thousands or even millions of lives a year.

March 3, 2017 9:00 am

A divided White House still offers little guidance on replacing Obamacare (Washington Post)

A meeting Friday afternoon between President Trump and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, his former rival in the GOP primaries, had no set agenda. But Kasich came armed with one anyway: his hope to blunt drastic changes to the nation’s health-care system envisioned by some conservatives in Washington.

February 14, 2017 9:00 am

French auditors criticize €5-billion science super-campus near Paris (Nature)

France’s government auditor has taken a sharp swipe at efforts to develop a science super-campus near Paris that, by 2020, was supposed to rival the world’s top campus universities, such as the US Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). More than €5.3 billion (US$5.7 billion) in public spending has been earmarked for the Paris-Saclay science cluster, the Court of Auditors estimates in an annual report published on 8 February — but the original vision of creating a large integrated research university there is “at a standstill”.

January 30, 2017 9:00 am

Journals invite too few women to referee (Nature)

Using a large data set that includes the genders and ages of authors and reviewers from 2012 to 2015 for the journals of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), we show that women were used less as reviewers than expected (on the basis of their proportion of membership of the society and as published authors in AGU journals). The bias is a result of authors and editors, especially male ones, suggesting women as reviewers less often, and a slightly higher decline rate among women in each age group when asked.

January 27, 2017 9:00 am

Japanese military entices academics to break taboo (Science)

In 1950, Japan’s scientific community, chastened by the complicity of researchers in their nation’s disastrous military adventurism, took an extraordinary vow. “To preserve our integrity as scientists, we express our firm commitment both domestically and abroad that we will never pursue scientific research for the purpose of war,” declared the Science Council of Japan (SCJ), now the nation’s equivalent to the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

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