Hot Topics: professional ethics

Blog Posts (46)

July 31, 2018

Credentialing Exam is A Battle for Power and Soul of Bioethics

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Like most members of the American Society for Bioethics & Humanities (ASBH), I received an email last week geared toward enticing me to sign up to take the new Healthcare Ethics Consultant accreditation exam.…

July 24, 2018

Newspaper Op-Eds Should Disclose Authors’ Industry Ties

Earlier this month, The Seattle Times published an op-ed by Samuel Browd, medical director of Seattle Children’s Sport Concussion Program, on the risks of brain injury in youth sports. Dr. Browd acknowledged troubling research on the dangers of repetitive brain trauma, but also emphasized that millions of children “have played contact sports without overt symptoms” and… Read more

The post Newspaper Op-Eds Should Disclose Authors’ Industry Ties appeared first on The Hastings Center.

July 9, 2018

Social Media, Privacy, and Research: A Muddled Landscape

The advent of social media technology has opened many new avenues of research in population health, demographics, psychology, and the social sciences. It is crucial to consider whether researchers conducting observational research using social media need to obtain consent from their research subjects, and whether the current research regulations in the United States establish effective,… Read more

The post Social Media, Privacy, and Research: A Muddled Landscape appeared first on The Hastings Center.

July 6, 2018

Certifying Clinical Ethics: Fracturing Bioethics

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

After an effort of nearly a decade, bioethics is taking a big step toward professionalization. Under the American Society for Bioethics & Humanities, the Healthcare Ethics Consultant Certification Commission has launched a health care ethics consultant certification program (HEC-C).…

July 5, 2018

BioethicsTV (June 27-July 4): #CodeBlack

Code Black (Season 3; Episode 10): Patients Asking Doctors to Lie to Family Members; Code Black (Season 3; Episode 11): Law enforcement pressuring nurse for blood draw

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

June 11, 2018

A Doctor’s Beauty

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN ETHICS PRIZE SECOND-PLACE WINNER By Carli Grace My mother is a “beautician”, the suffix -ician denoting a person skilled in the prefix, beauty, or more simply a hairdresser. Growing up my kitchen always smelled of ammonia and hair bleach, and my kitchen sink was used as a makeshift shampoo bowl. My […]
June 4, 2018

BioethicsTV (May 30, 2018): #CodeBlack Patient racism and DNRs

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Code Black (Season 3; Episode 5): Patient Racism

A middle-aged-white patient needs an appendectomy. As he is being wheeled to surgery, he is beside the chief of surgery and a new trauma surgery resident.…

May 22, 2018

BioethicsTV (May 14-22): #TheResident, #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Resident (Season 1; Episode 14): Treating Loved Ones; Chemo for Healthy Patients ; Chicago Med (Season 3; Episode 20): Doctor and jury

The Resident (Season 1; Episode 14): Treating Loved Ones; Chemo for Healthy Patients

In the season finale, we learn that Hunter has been telling healthy people that they have cancer (when they do not) and giving them chemotherapy.…

May 11, 2018

BioethicsTV (May 7-11): #ChicagoMed, #GreysAnatomy

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Chicago Med (Season 3; Episode 19): Maternal-Fetal Conflict; Grey’s Anatomy (Season 14; Episode 23): Personal Disclosures of Illness

As the traditional television season comes to a close, many medical dramas have steered away from ethical dilemmas in medical care to heighten the drama among their characters in order to provide strong cliff hangers for the season finale.

May 7, 2018

BioethicsTV (April 30 – May 4): #TheResident; #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Resident (Season 1; Episode 12): Pressures of the Medical Life; Making promises; Chicago Med (Season 3; Episode 18): Crisis response

The Resident (Season 1; Episode 12): Pressures of the Medical Life; Making promises

When Bradley, a resident, falls through a glass ceiling and crashes onto the board room table, Bell’s first reaction is that neither the hospital nor he are responsible for the epidemic of suicides in medicine.…

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Published Articles (19)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 7 - Jul 2018

“A Little ELF, Please?” The Electronic Long-Form COI Disclosure Statement (ELFCOI) Lisa Kearns & Arthur Caplan

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

Were the “Pioneer” Clinical Ethics Consultants “Outsiders”? For Them, Was “Critical Distance” That Critical? Bruce D. White, Wayne N. Shelton & Cassandra J. Rivais

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

Outsider/Insider Albert R. Jonsen

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

“Natural” Talents and Dedication—Meanings and Values in Sport Thomas H. Murray

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 9 Issue 2 - Jun 2018

How acceptable is paternalism? A survey-based study of clinician and nonclinician opinions on paternalistic decision making Kunal Bailoor, Thomas Valley, Chithra Perumalswami, Andrew G. Shuman, Raymond DeVries & Darin B. Zahuranec

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 5 - May 2018

Peering into the Future of Peer Review Kayhan Parsi & Nanette Elster

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

Same behavior, different provider: American medical students' attitudes toward reporting risky behaviors committed by doctors, nurses, and classmates Sahil Aggarwal & Aaron Kheriaty

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

A Question of Social Justice: How Policies of Profit Negate Engagement of Developing World Bioethicists and Undermine Global Bioethics Subrata Chattopadhyay, Catherine Myser, Tiffany Moxham & Raymond De Vries

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

Justice and Bioethics: Who Should Finance Academic Publishing? Udo Schuklenk (Joint Editor in Chief) & David Magnus (Editor in Chief)

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2017

Ethics, Ethicists, and Professional Organizations in the Neurological Sciences Tabitha Moses & Judy Illes

News (31)

August 13, 2018 4:11 am

Japanese medical university admits to discriminating against female applicants (Science)

A prominent Japanese medical university said yesterday that school administrators have deliberately manipulated entrance exam scores to limit the number of women admitted. The confession helps explain the lopsided gender ratio of graduates from Tokyo Medical University (TMU) and strengthens suspicions that similar practices have prevailed at other Japanese medical schools.

August 9, 2018 2:53 am

Doctors With Disabilities Push For Culture Change In Medicine (NPR)

Doctors are often portrayed as pinnacles of health, superhumans responding to emergencies around the clock, performing miracles of all kinds. They’re seen as the fixers, not the ones ever in need of accommodations or care. “This profession historically has viewed themselves as able-bodied in the extreme,” Iezzoni says. Now, a growing movement of current and aspiring doctors with disabilities is starting to challenge that narrative, saying it is a disservice both to the medical profession and to patients.

July 27, 2018 10:35 am

A Growing Number Of Pharmacists Are Denying Patients Their Medication Because Of Moral Objections (WGBH)

A CVS pharmacist in Fountain Hills, Arizona, was fired last Friday after refusing to fill a hormone prescription for a transgender woman. This is the second recent incident of a pharmacist in Arizona refusing to give medication to a customer. Last month, a Walgreens pharmacist in Peoria, Arizona, refused to give a pregnant women medication that was intended to cause a miscarriage because her baby had stopped developing within her womb. Arizona is one of the six states along with, Georgia, Idaho, South Dakota, Arkansas, and Mississippi, that allow pharmacists to refuse to fill prescriptions based on moral or religious reasons.

July 9, 2018 12:00 pm

Why science breeds a culture of sexism (The Guardian)

Late-night research, isolation and a strict, male-dominated hierarchy are the perfect conditions for sexual harassment. With colleges struggling to enforce conduct codes, what can be done?

June 19, 2018 9:00 am

Half of women in science experience harassment, a sweeping new report finds (Washington Post)

Science has a sexual harassment problem. From the most polished ivory tower to the local community college, harassment pervades lecture halls and laboratories, observatories and offices, teaching hospitals and Antarctic field sites. And it takes an economic and emotional toll on female researchers and stifles their scientific contributions, according to a sweeping new study released Tuesday.

June 18, 2018 11:16 am

Controversial NIH study of ‘moderate drinking’ will be terminated after scathing report (STAT)

The group examining the Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health (MACH) Trial also found that, starting in 2013, “there was early and frequent engagement” between NIH officials and the alcohol industry that appeared to be “an attempt to persuade industry to support the project. Several members of NIAAA staff kept key facts hidden from other institute staff members.”

June 1, 2018 9:00 am

Will U.S. academies expel sexual harassers? (Science)

As high-profile sexual harassment cases fuel public criticism, the presidents of the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine announced last week they may adopt new policies allowing the prestigious bodies to eject members who have committed harassment and other forms of misconduct. Members of the academies—which serve as both honorific societies and advisers to the U.S. government—are elected by existing members to life-long terms, and the bodies currently lack mechanisms for removing them for harassment.

May 21, 2018 9:00 am

Medical Experts Blast U.S.C.’s Silence Over Gynecologist Scandal (The New York Times)

For decades, allegations of misconduct dogged the primary gynecologist in the student health center at the University of Southern California. There were reports that he inappropriately touched students during pelvic exams and made sexual comments about their bodies.

Yet even after university officials suspended the doctor, George Tyndall, in 2016 and forced him to step down a year later, they did not report the accusations to the California Medical Board. When their internal investigation was complete, officials said that the findings were a personnel matter and that there was no legal obligation to notify the state oversight board, which investigates doctors accused of misconduct.

May 17, 2018 11:00 am

Why it’s hard to prove gender discrimination in science (Nature)

To prove gender discrimination in court, plaintiffs must show that they were denied opportunities or rewards because of their gender. Harassment can also be a sign of discrimination when the people responsible are in positions of power. However, recognizing and remedying these problems in academia is challenging for reasons that are deeply entrenched in the culture of science, and in how institutions have long operated, say legal and social-science scholars.

May 16, 2018 9:00 am

At Google, ‘responsibility’ upstages new technology (Washington Post)

In his keynote address on Tuesday, chief executive Sundar Pichai is expected to emphasize the theme of responsibility, the person said. Last year’s keynote was more focused on developments in artificial intelligence. The anticipated shift in tone at the event reflects increased public skepticism and scrutiny of the technology industry as it reckons with the negative consequences of how its products are used by billions of people.

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