Hot Topics: Science

Blog Posts (50)

August 24, 2018

Ethics and Society Newsfeed – August 24, 2018

Bioethics/Medical Ethics Jahi McMath, Teen At Center Of Medical And Religious Debate On Brain Death, Has Died Jahi McMath, a brain-dead patient who had been on life support since 2013, died on June 22, 2018 because of liver failure. McMath’s situation sparked a debate over whether brain-dead patients are considered physically dead. Though McMath is […]
July 11, 2018

Secret Twin Experiments & Bioethics.net 15 seconds of fame

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

On the advice of a family friend, I went to see the new documentary, Three Identical Strangers.

May 8, 2018

Speaking to the Media about Antimicrobial Resistance: A Deeper Description of How I Wear Many Hats as a Bioethicist

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week, I was interviewed by an academic news serviceabout antimicrobial resistance (AMR) after a study reported that giving antibiotics to children in selected African towns led to a decreased mortality rate.  …

April 26, 2018

War Against Science 3.0: The EPA, Doublespeak, and Obfuscation

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Transparency is a good thing. In ethics courses, we teach that doctors should be transparent to their patients, being truthful and disclosing information.…

April 17, 2018

The End is Nigh: Bioethics and Antibiotic Resistance

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

 ‘We’re out of Options’: Doctors Battle Drug-Resistant Typhoid Outbreak – 13 April 2018

New Concerns Over ‘Super Gonorrhea’ That’s Resistant to All Drugs – 4 April 2018

‘Nightmare’ bacteria, resistant to almost every drug, stalk U.S.

February 21, 2018

Insider Report: NIH Alters Pre-Award Human Subjects Concerns Reporting; IRBs Not Told

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

On February 16, 2018, bioethics.net received an NIH memo sent to program officers on the same day.…

January 25, 2018

Monkey See, Human Do: Cloning Macaque Monkeys with Fetal Cells

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

 “How afraid of human cloning should we be?”
Monkeys have been cloned, Paving the way for human cloning
Yes, They’ve Cloned Monkeys in China.

January 24, 2018

Electronic Preprints and the Ingelfinger Rule

by David B. Resnik, JD, PhD,

Since 1969, the New England Journal of Medicine has maintained a policy, known as the Ingelfinger Rule, against publishing articles which have already been published or reported to the media. …

January 12, 2018

Whose Rights are Right?: The Debate Over Animal Rights in Research

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE HONORABLE MENTION By Brianna Blunck Animal research has been conventionally practiced under the notion that it has played a vital role in scientific and medical advances, but our use of animals should not continue without periods of reflection on the morality and necessity of their use. George Yancy, PhD and … More Whose Rights are Right?: The Debate Over Animal Rights in Research
November 1, 2017

Rand Paul is About to Legislate Peer-Review: Scientists Need Not Apply

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Senator and former Presidential candidate Rand Paul introduced S. 1973, a bill that would change how scientific grant proposals are reviewed.…

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Published Articles (4)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 2 - Feb 2016

The Porosity of Autonomy: Social and Biological Constitution of the Patient in Biomedicine Jonathan Beever & Nicolae Morar

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 4 - Apr 2015

Ideology and Microbiology: Ebola, Science, and Deliberative Democracy Joseph J. Fins

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

If I Could Just Stop Loving You: Anti-Love Biotechnology and the Ethics of a Chemical Breakup Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

The Difficult Case of Voluntariness as Autonomy in Anti-Love Biotechnology Hywote Taye

News (157)

September 21, 2018 9:00 am

Human genome could contain up to 20 percent fewer genes, researchers reveal (Science Daily)

A new study reveals that up to 20 percent of genes classified as coding (those that produce the proteins that are the building blocks of all living things) may not be coding after all because they have characteristics that are typical of non-coding or pseudogenes (obsolete coding genes). The work once again highlights doubts about the number of real genes present in human cells 15 years after the sequencing the human genome.
September 6, 2018 1:32 am

Scientists Are Retooling Bacteria to Cure Disease (The New York Times)

In a study carried out over the summer, a group of volunteers drank a white, peppermint-ish concoction laced with billions of bacteria. The microbes had been engineered to break down a naturally occurring toxin in the blood. The vast majority of us can do this without any help. But for those who cannot, these microbes may someday become a living medicine.

August 15, 2018 9:00 am

Bayer shares slide after Monsanto's Roundup cancer trial (Reuters)

Shares in Bayer (BAYGn.DE) plunged more than 10 percent to their lowest in almost two years after a California jury ordered the German company’s subsidiary Monsanto to pay $289 million in damages last week.

August 7, 2018 9:00 am

Tickborne Diseases — Confronting a Growing Threat (The New England Journal of Medicine)

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of reported cases of tickborne disease has more than doubled over the past 13 years.

July 30, 2018 3:00 am

European court ruling raises hurdles for CRISPR crops (Science)

Hopes for an easier regulatory road for genetic engineering in European agriculture were dashed today by the Court of Justice of the European Union. In a closely watched decision, the court ruled that plants created with new gene-editing techniques that don’t involve transferring genes between organisms—such as CRISPR—must go through the same lengthy approval process as traditional transgenic plants.

July 9, 2018 12:00 pm

Why science breeds a culture of sexism (The Guardian)

Late-night research, isolation and a strict, male-dominated hierarchy are the perfect conditions for sexual harassment. With colleges struggling to enforce conduct codes, what can be done?

May 9, 2018 9:00 am

In monkeys, researchers find possible biological marker of autism (STAT)

Researchers have been left empty-handed so far in their quest to uncover some measurable biological signal that could be used to diagnose autism spectrum disorder, leaving clinicians to identify the condition just based on a child’s behavior. But on Wednesday, scientists reported in the journal Science Translational Medicine that a hormone that regulates blood pressure could be one of those signposts.

April 27, 2018 9:00 am

Flu virus finally sequenced in its native form (Nature)

The genome of the flu virus has been fully sequenced in its native RNA form for the first time. Previously, all influenza genomes — as well as those of other viruses that store their genetic material as RNA — had been determined by copying the molecule into DNA. The native flu genome was generated using ‘nanopore’ sequencing technology, which reads RNA strands as they stream through a tiny molecular channel.

April 23, 2018 2:56 pm

Can a genetic weapon combat one of the world’s major crop destroyers? (Science)

The spotted wing fruit fly is one of the world’s major crop destroyers. Scientifically known as Drosophila suzukii, this peppercorn-size insect uses a serrated organ to lay its eggs inside—rather than on top of—unripe fruit, damaging raspberry, strawberry, and cherry crops across the globe. Now, scientists may have found a way to fight this pest using a strategy called gene drive, which can spread genes rapidly through a population.

January 29, 2018 9:00 am

Artificial neurons compute faster than the human brain (Nature)

Superconducting computing chips modeled after neurons can process information faster and more efficiently than the human brain. That achievement, described in Science Advances on 26 January, is a key benchmark in the development of advanced computing devices designed to mimic biological systems. And it could open the door to more natural machine-learning software, although many hurdles remain before it could be used commercially.

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