Hot Topics: Science

Blog Posts (25)

January 10, 2017

Be Wary What You Research: You Might Get Sued

by Craig M. Klugman, Ph.D.

Peter Cohen, Clayton Bloszies, Caleb Yee and Roy Gerona published an article in the journal Drug Testing and Analysis in April 2015 explaining the results of their testing of supplements.…

January 2, 2017

The Year in Bioethics That Was - 2016

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Happy New Year. As has become a tradition at the bioethics.net blogs, the ending of one year and beginning of another is a time for reflection, for reviewing the year that has passed and planning for the year to come.…

December 14, 2016

The Ethics of Climate Change Activism: Fear vs. Reality

STUDENT VOICES By: Chelsea Zantay This essay is in response to the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs video clip “Global Ethics Forum: Ethics Matter: A Conversation with Bill McKibben.”   Often when a problem is too big or too scary we throw up our hands and announce that “there is nothing we can do” … More The Ethics of Climate Change Activism: Fear vs. Reality
November 9, 2016

Bioethics faces a rocky but navigable road

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

Academic bioethics has never been popular with Republicans.  Libertarians dislike academic bioethics because it seems too elitist and anti-free market. …

November 9, 2016

President Trump & A Republican Congress: What Might It Mean?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In a 2000 episode of The Simpsons, a flash forward shows Lisa being elected the first heterosexual female U.S.…

September 30, 2016

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: September 30, 2016

Technology and Ethics Tech Giants Team Up To Tackle The Ethics Of Artificial Intelligence The Partnership on Artificial Intelligence to Benefit People and Society, consisting of Amazon, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and IBM (with Apple in talks to join), weighs in on the … Continue reading
June 10, 2016

Small Minds

I have recently read an opinion piece published in the Chronicle of Higher Education by John Kaag and David O’Hara entitled Big Brains, Small Minds. In this article Kaag and O’Hara boldly assert that “We are on the verge of becoming the best trained, and least educated, society since the Romans”. In the ensuing explanation we learn that education is science is what he refers to as “trained” while education in the humanities is what he refers to as “educated”. Apparently I have been trained and he has been educated. What a crock. Because I have been trained and not educated it is probably important to clarify that I mean crock not in the sense of an earthenware jar but rather in the sense of something which is complete nonsense.

Kaag and O’Hara appear to believe that one of the primary roles of the humanities is to critique science. That is fine; everybody should critique science, it is much too important to not be evaluated in the context of all types of human knowledge and understanding. It is also fine that they suggest that humanities should not be judged by the metrics of hard science. Of note, however, is I have never heard anyone suggest that humanities should be judged by the metrics of hard science. But I think it is probably important to note, however, that if it is the job of humanities to critique science perhaps those doing the critiquing should also know some science. It should also be kept in mind that scientists are pretty good at critiquing the sciences and, in fact, we usually spend quite a bit of time and energy critiquing each other. Just for the record, Kaag and O’Hara write that Plato teaches us that part of the liberal arts enduring mission is to critique the objectives of science. Science was rather different in the time of Plato. Perhaps he should have a more recent reference. He should also remember that at the time of Plato there was really no distinct boundary between science and philosophy. The authors cite the story of Herodicus as told by Socrates as an example of a disordered mind having “been trained in the STEM fields of his time”.  Really! This took place in the fifth century BC. Again, I think we may well need a newer reference. Parenthetically Herodicus showed great insight in advocating the value of exercise in preserving health.

The job of a professional scientist is to learn what has previously been unknown. They must be able to understand and appreciate the state of knowledge in their field, identify the boundaries of knowledge, and formulate hypotheses that if proven produce new knowledge. For a scientist to be successful they assume the burden of proving or disproving that hypothesis. They must have the communications skills to present their ideas in an adequately compelling manner to be awarded resources to engage these scientific pursuits. They must communicate their findings to the world. None of these are endeavors of the small mind.

The authors of this essay state “If you’re interested in learning about justice, you don’t go to the chemistry laboratory. You go to philosophy class and travel to Plato’s Republic. Perhaps so but I am unconvinced. If the justice one seeks has to do with environmental preservation, species extinction, and biomedical innovation perhaps this is positively contributed to by those who have had their minds expanded by an education which includes science.

 

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

May 12, 2016

Why Science Denial is Immoral

By Christopher S. Kovel, M.A. Today’s society is built and shaped by technology and scientific discovery but, surprisingly, pervading scientific denial lingers. Irrational skepticism and flat-out denial of uncontroversial theories is not just a rebuke of the facts of science … Continue reading
April 7, 2016

BioethicsTV: “Heartbeat” tackles therapeutic misconception

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

On episode 4 of Heartbeat, the heroine, Dr. Panttiere has received hospital funding to try an experimental cancer treatment on 5 patients.…

October 5, 2015

Your Biology is in My Technology

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The PBS series Open Mind has been on television for nearly 60 years. The program “is a thoughtful excursion into the world of ideas.” The December 30 episode was an interview with Dr.

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Published Articles (4)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 2 - Feb 2016

The Porosity of Autonomy: Social and Biological Constitution of the Patient in Biomedicine Jonathan Beever & Nicolae Morar

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 4 - Apr 2015

Ideology and Microbiology: Ebola, Science, and Deliberative Democracy Joseph J. Fins

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

If I Could Just Stop Loving You: Anti-Love Biotechnology and the Ethics of a Chemical Breakup Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

The Difficult Case of Voluntariness as Autonomy in Anti-Love Biotechnology Hywote Taye

News (114)

January 11, 2017 9:00 am

Capital Weather Gang U.S. posts second-warmest year on record, breadth of warmth ‘unparalleled’ (Washington Post)

Every single state and every single city in the Lower 48 states was warmer than normal in 2016.

January 6, 2017 9:00 am

How drones could become a farmer’s best friend (Science)

Researchers have now used images captured by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to map barley fields and determine which rows of plants are most in need of water

December 21, 2016 9:00 am

Update: Surprise! Innovation bill clears House, heads to president (Science)

“This bill maximizes the nation’s investment in basic research, and helps boost U.S. competitiveness, creates jobs and spurs new business and industries”

December 19, 2016 9:00 am

2016 in pictures: The best science images of the year (Nature)

In a year of political turmoil and shock, science, too, came up with surprises. To document some of these wonders, photographers roamed the world, revealing objects from the microscopic to the cosmic in scale.

December 9, 2016 9:00 am

Black-hole fireworks win big in multimillion-dollar science prizes (http://www.nature.com/news/black-hole-fireworks-win-big-in-multimillion-dollar-science-prizes-1.21087)

The discovery of the black-hole firewall paradox — one of the most confounding puzzles to emerge in physics in recent years — has bagged its co-founder a share of one of this year’s US$3-million Breakthrough Prizes.

December 7, 2016 9:00 am

Newly discovered state of memory could help explain learning and brain disorders (Science)

This new memory state could have a range of practical implications, from helping college students learn more efficiently to assisting people with memory-related neurological conditions.

November 21, 2016 9:00 am

With Trump, Gingrich and GOP calling the shots, NASA may go back to the moon (Washington Post)

The new administration will insert a mission to the lunar surface, probably international in character, as a step on the way to Mars

November 16, 2016 9:00 am

Too many people are being told they have a vitamin D deficiency (Washington Post)

Doctors are warning about vitamin D again, and it’s not the “we need more” news you might expect.

November 15, 2016 9:00 am

West Nile virus may be Deadlier than Thought (Science Magazine)

Since West Nile fever first appeared in the United States in 1999, more than 45,000 people have been infected. A new study shows that the fatality rate may be higher than researchers previously thought.

November 8, 2016 8:01 am

The average U.S. family destroys a football field's worth of Arctic sea ice every 30 years (Science)

The jet fuel you burned on that flight from New York City to London? Say goodbye to 1 square meter of Arctic sea ice.

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