Hot Topics: Science

Blog Posts (18)

May 12, 2016

Why Science Denial is Immoral

By Christopher S. Kovel, M.A. Today’s society is built and shaped by technology and scientific discovery but, surprisingly, pervading scientific denial lingers. Irrational skepticism and flat-out denial of uncontroversial theories is not just a rebuke of the facts of science … Continue reading
April 7, 2016

BioethicsTV: “Heartbeat” tackles therapeutic misconception

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

On episode 4 of Heartbeat, the heroine, Dr. Panttiere has received hospital funding to try an experimental cancer treatment on 5 patients.…

October 5, 2015

Your Biology is in My Technology

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The PBS series Open Mind has been on television for nearly 60 years. The program “is a thoughtful excursion into the world of ideas.” The December 30 episode was an interview with Dr.

October 1, 2015

True Confessions: Keeping up with the literature

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

When I was a graduate student learning about the job of being an academic, my advisor gave me some good advice.…

September 17, 2015

Science anyone?

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

Plenty of pundits are analyzing the Wednesday night GOP debate in terms of who won and who lost.

September 10, 2015

Ashley Madison & Using Stolen Data

by Arthur L Caplan, PhD and Charles Seife, MS

This past August, the public was treated to gigabytes of data stolen from the Ashley Madison website, including detailed records on millions of people who had registered for their service.…

August 31, 2015

Hashtag Advocacy or Slacktivism: How Should We Evaluate the Impact of Social Media Campaigns for Public Health?

by Macey L. Henderson, J.D.

It takes more than a TV news story or a Twitter hashtag campaign to save lives.…

April 23, 2015

Designer Embryos: The Future is Now

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Oh, wonder!
How many goodly creatures are there here!
How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world,
That has such people in ’t!

March 25, 2015

A Pill for Compassion or Misunderstood Science?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

For at least a decade, studies have shown that empathy and compassion decline in medical students.…

March 12, 2015

War Against Science 2.0: If You Can’t Beat ‘Em, Ban ‘Em

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

That’s the good thing about science: It’s true whether or not you believe in it. That’s why it works-Neil deGrasse Tyson

The data of climate change is very strong: warmest average years on record, increasing extreme weather, higher carbon dioxide levels, changes in sea level, increasing droughts, decreasing snowpacks and sea ice, melting glaciers and permafrost, warmer oceans and increasing ocean acidity.…

View More Blog Entries

Published Articles (4)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 2 - Feb 2016

The Porosity of Autonomy: Social and Biological Constitution of the Patient in Biomedicine Jonathan Beever & Nicolae Morar

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 4 - Apr 2015

Ideology and Microbiology: Ebola, Science, and Deliberative Democracy Joseph J. Fins

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

If I Could Just Stop Loving You: Anti-Love Biotechnology and the Ethics of a Chemical Breakup Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

The Difficult Case of Voluntariness as Autonomy in Anti-Love Biotechnology Hywote Taye

News (93)

May 20, 2016 8:49 am

Nearly a third of women in academic medicine experience sexual harassment (Reuters)

For women in U.S. medical research, sexual harassment is less common than 20 years ago, but it was still experienced by 30 percent of those responding to a new survey, compared to just 4 percent of men, researchers say.

May 10, 2016 8:07 am

Researcher under fire for New Yorker epigenetics article (Nature)

A story about epigenetics in the 2 May issue of The New Yorker has been sharply criticized for inaccurately describing how genes are regulated. The article by Siddhartha Mukherjee — a physician, cancer researcher and award-winning author at Columbia University in New York — examines how environmental factors can change the activity of genes without altering the DNA sequence. Jerry Coyne, an evolutionary ecologist at the University of Chicago in Illinois, posted two widely discussed blog posts calling the piece “superficial and misleading”, largely because it ignored key aspects of gene regulation.

May 5, 2016 9:46 am

Bacteria-Infected Mosquitoes Could Slow Spread of Zika Virus (New York Times)

If there is ever a contest for Least Appreciated Creature on Earth, first prize should go to a microbe called Wolbachia. The bacterium infects millions of invertebrate species, including spiders, shrimps and parasitic worms, as well as 60 percent of all insect species. Once in residence, Wolbachia co-opts its hosts’ reproductive machinery and often greedily shields them from a variety of competing infections.

February 29, 2016 8:24 pm

520-million-year-old fossilized nervous system is most detailed example yet found

Researchers have found one of the oldest and most detailed fossils of the central nervous system yet identified, from a crustacean-like animal that lived more than 500 million years ago. The fossil, from southern China, has been so well preserved that individual nerves are visible, the first time this level of detail has been observed in a fossil of this age.

September 23, 2015 6:01 pm

You’re surrounded by a cloud of bacteria as unique as a fingerprint

Do you ever feel like you’re all alone in the world? Well, don’t. At every moment of your life, you’re surrounded by a cloud of bacteria. These microbial companions are so unique to you that the cloud — which you leave traces of everywhere you go — might actually be as identifiable as a fingerprint.

September 14, 2015 4:47 pm

Military's Prosthetic Hand Can Feel

In the first series of tests, researchers gently touched each finger of the prosthetic hand while the man was wearing a blindfold.  He was able to state with nearly 100-percent accuracy which finger was being touched, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, better known as DARPA, said in a statement Friday.

September 10, 2015 5:10 pm

Stanford scientists produce cancer drug from rare plant in lab to benefit human health

Stanford scientists produced a common cancer drug – previously only available from an endangered plant – in a common laboratory plant. This work could lead to a more stable supply of the drug and allow scientists to manipulate that drug to make it even safer and more effective.

May 26, 2015 3:55 pm

Berkeley Robot Learns Through Trial and Error (Like Humans)

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a robot capable of learning new skills through trial and error.

April 27, 2015 1:59 pm

Decline in U.S. science spending threatens economy, security: MIT

Warning of an “innovation deficit,” scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology say declining government spending on basic research is holding back potentially life-saving advances in 15 fields, from robotics and fusion energy to Alzheimer’s disease and agriculture.

April 14, 2015 2:15 pm

Academics rate women job applicants higher than identical men: study

When hundreds of U.S. college faculty members rated junior scientists based on scholarly record, job interview performance and other information with an eye toward which should be hired, they preferred women over identically qualified men two-to-one, scientists reported on Monday.

View More News Items