Hot Topics: Science

Blog Posts (7)

June 12, 2014

How Old Are You? Philosophy of Age and Its Relevance for Bioethics

by J.S. Blumenthal-Barby, Ph.D.

How old are you?

Robert Pogue Harrison, Literature Professor at Stanford University, recently reflected on this question during a monologue on his radio show, “Entitled Opinions.” (Plug for this great show, by the way: http://www.stanford.edu/dept/fren-ital/opinions/)

Strikingly, he makes the case that although several scholars have offered a philosophy of time (most notably Martin Heidegger), a philosophical analysis of age has been lacking.…

June 6, 2014

Getting An Earful

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the book (and film) Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton, dinosaur DNA from in insects that bit the dinosaurs and are now preserved in amber.…

March 19, 2014

The New Patrons of Science

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

While Leonardo DaVinci worked on his many amazing inventions, his work was subsidized by patrons such as Ludovico Sforza, Cesare Borgia, and Giuliano de’Medici.…

February 19, 2014

Your Short-Order Stem Cells May Not Have Arrived After All!

A few weeks ago I blogged about a Japanese researcher's piece in Nature, in which she claimed to have induced pluripotency in mouse blood cells simply by immersing the cells in an acid bath for a half-hour.  It now emerges that the ...
December 4, 2013

Where Have All the Negative Results Gone?

by Craig M. Klugman, PhD

This week I gave a lecture at a university in Texas on ways to teach research ethics.…

September 4, 2013

Media Meld: Science, Credit and Peer-Review

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week, a research team at the University of Washington announced what they jokingly refered to as a “Vulcan mind meld.” For those of you who are not Star Trek aficionados, that fictional process is where a Vulcan can reach into the mind of another Vulcan or human to understand and read that other mind.…

August 30, 2013

Faster Than the Speed of Thought

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the 1983 comedic film, The Man with Two Brains,”  Steve Martin’s character falls in love with a female brain preserved in a jar.…

Published Articles (2)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

If I Could Just Stop Loving You: Anti-Love Biotechnology and the Ethics of a Chemical Breakup Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

The Difficult Case of Voluntariness as Autonomy in Anti-Love Biotechnology Hywote Taye

News (73)

October 20, 2014 2:09 pm

Scientist catches spider the size of a puppy

Harvard zoologist Piotr Naskrecki was taking a nighttime walk in a rainforest in Guyana when he happened upon a rare Goliath birdeater spider.

October 14, 2014 4:42 pm

Ancient Indonesian cave paintings rewrite history of human art

Prehistoric paintings at least 40,000 years old that depict animals – including one known as a “pig-deer” – and the outline of human hands in seven caves on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi are rewriting the history of art.

October 9, 2014 1:31 pm

For diabetes, stem cell recipe offers new hope

Douglas Melton is as impatient as anyone for a cure for diabetes. His son developed the disease as an infant, and his daughter was diagnosed at age 14. For most of the past 2 decades, the developmental biologist at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute has focused his research on finding a cure.

October 9, 2014 1:29 pm

Send Your Name to Mars on Orion's First Flight

NASA may not have yet figured out how to send humans to Mars, but that doesn’t mean you can’t make a name for yourself. The space agency is inviting the public to send their names on a microchip that will travel to destinations beyond the low-Earth orbit, including Mars, aboard the Orion spacecraft’s first flight.

Read more: http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/9479/20141009/send-your-name-to-mars-on-orions-first-flight.htm#ixzz3FfbbZOjX

October 8, 2014 2:24 pm

Nobel Prize for seeing how life works at molecular level

A German and two American scientists won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday for smashing the size barrier in optical microscopes, allowing researchers to see individual molecules inside living cells.

October 6, 2014 12:44 pm

Nobel prize in medicine awarded for discovery of brain’s ‘GPS’

Three scientists, including a husband-and-wife team, have been awarded this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine for deciphering the mechanism in the brain that allows us to find our way around.

September 26, 2014 1:29 pm

Half Of Our Planet's Water May Be Older Than The Sun

The next time you reach for a glass of water you might want to think about its primordial origins. A new study suggests that upwards of 50% of the Earth’s water may be older thank the solar system itself.

September 25, 2014 7:19 pm

Volunteers use 3D printers to create inexpensive prosthetics

An online organization of more than 1,500 volunteers is using 3D printers to produce prosthetic hands or fingers for people around the world who need them.

September 16, 2014 5:29 pm

This Startup Could Turn Your iPhone Into a Tiny Disease-Detecting Lab

A mobile phone can do so many things. At any given moment, it can be a camera, a game console, a GPS, or a flashlight, just to name a few of its many guises. But Max Perelman wants to add another. He wants to turn the average iPhone into a tiny laboratory.

September 8, 2014 2:50 pm

Multitasking Gene May Help Drone Operators Control Robotic Swarms

A genetic variant that keeps dopamine levels high could lead to personalized training and also benefit personnel in ERs and air traffic control towers.

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