Hot Topics: Science

Blog Posts (7)

June 12, 2014

How Old Are You? Philosophy of Age and Its Relevance for Bioethics

by J.S. Blumenthal-Barby, Ph.D.

How old are you?

Robert Pogue Harrison, Literature Professor at Stanford University, recently reflected on this question during a monologue on his radio show, “Entitled Opinions.” (Plug for this great show, by the way: http://www.stanford.edu/dept/fren-ital/opinions/)

Strikingly, he makes the case that although several scholars have offered a philosophy of time (most notably Martin Heidegger), a philosophical analysis of age has been lacking.…

June 6, 2014

Getting An Earful

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the book (and film) Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton, dinosaur DNA from in insects that bit the dinosaurs and are now preserved in amber.…

March 19, 2014

The New Patrons of Science

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

While Leonardo DaVinci worked on his many amazing inventions, his work was subsidized by patrons such as Ludovico Sforza, Cesare Borgia, and Giuliano de’Medici.…

February 19, 2014

Your Short-Order Stem Cells May Not Have Arrived After All!

A few weeks ago I blogged about a Japanese researcher's piece in Nature, in which she claimed to have induced pluripotency in mouse blood cells simply by immersing the cells in an acid bath for a half-hour.  It now emerges that the ...
December 4, 2013

Where Have All the Negative Results Gone?

by Craig M. Klugman, PhD

This week I gave a lecture at a university in Texas on ways to teach research ethics.…

September 4, 2013

Media Meld: Science, Credit and Peer-Review

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week, a research team at the University of Washington announced what they jokingly refered to as a “Vulcan mind meld.” For those of you who are not Star Trek aficionados, that fictional process is where a Vulcan can reach into the mind of another Vulcan or human to understand and read that other mind.…

August 30, 2013

Faster Than the Speed of Thought

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the 1983 comedic film, The Man with Two Brains,”  Steve Martin’s character falls in love with a female brain preserved in a jar.…

Published Articles (2)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

If I Could Just Stop Loving You: Anti-Love Biotechnology and the Ethics of a Chemical Breakup Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

The Difficult Case of Voluntariness as Autonomy in Anti-Love Biotechnology Hywote Taye

News (61)

July 22, 2014 6:49 pm

Tracking Life From Its Smallest Form

The earliest stages of life have been the subject of intense fascination for eons. Aristotle, for instance, observed and recorded the development of a chicken embryo in its egg.

July 16, 2014 7:07 pm

Could Giant Viruses Be the Origin of Life on Earth?

The married virologists at Aix-Marseille University had made a career of it. But pithovirus, which they discovered in 2013 in a sample of Siberian dirt that had been frozen for more than 30,000 years, was more bizarre than the pair had ever imagined a virus could be.

July 9, 2014 1:55 pm

Transgender Algae Show How Males and Females Came to Be

One of the few things older than the battle of the sexes is the origin of the sexes. How sexes evolved in the first place has been a lasting mystery in biology. Thanks to some transgender algae, scientists may have cracked this evolutionary whodunit.

June 16, 2014 4:43 pm

Dad invents bionic pancreas to help diabetic son

Biomedical engineer Ed Damiano developed a device to monitor his son David’s blood sugar levels, but the invention could soon also wind up in the hands of other type 1 diabetics.

 

June 2, 2014 2:08 pm

A nice, bright smile: Scientists use lasers to regrow teeth

Scientists have come up with a bright idea – literally – to repair teeth.

May 20, 2014 1:49 pm

Here come the rice-grain-sized brain implants: Stanford discovers way of beaming power to microimplants deep inside your body

Stanford electrical engineer and biological implant mastermind, Ada Poon, has discovered a way of wirelessly transmitting power to tiny, rice-grain-sized implants that are deep within the human body.

May 13, 2014 3:03 pm

U.S. FDA approves 'Star Wars' robotic arm for amputees

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a robotic arm for amputees that is named for the “Star Wars” character Luke Skywalker and can perform multiple, simultaneous movements, a huge advance over the metal hook currently in use.

May 2, 2014 3:32 pm

Neanderthals Are People, Too

Let us focus on such experiments using stem cells — not to create individuals, but to create cells and tissues in the test tube instead of the re-creation of Neanderthals

April 29, 2014 4:07 pm

Graduate Student Creates a Nanowire Just Three Atoms Wide Using an Electron Beam

Vanderbilt Ph.D. graduate student Junhao Lin’s three-atom nanoscale wire could be used to craft paper-thin electronic components that could in turn lead to much smaller and thinner mobile electronics.

April 25, 2014 1:56 pm

Watch a 20-Mile Long Iceberg Drift Into the Southern Ocean

Ever since a massive crack was discovered in Antarctica’s Pine Island Glacier in 2011, NASA researchers and other scientists have kept a close watch on this area.

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