Hot Topics: Science

Blog Posts (15)

October 1, 2015

True Confessions: Keeping up with the literature

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

When I was a graduate student learning about the job of being an academic, my advisor gave me some good advice.…

September 17, 2015

Science anyone?

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

Plenty of pundits are analyzing the Wednesday night GOP debate in terms of who won and who lost.

September 10, 2015

Ashley Madison & Using Stolen Data

by Arthur L Caplan, PhD and Charles Seife, MS

This past August, the public was treated to gigabytes of data stolen from the Ashley Madison website, including detailed records on millions of people who had registered for their service.…

August 31, 2015

Hashtag Advocacy or Slacktivism: How Should We Evaluate the Impact of Social Media Campaigns for Public Health?

by Macey L. Henderson, J.D.

It takes more than a TV news story or a Twitter hashtag campaign to save lives.…

April 23, 2015

Designer Embryos: The Future is Now

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Oh, wonder!
How many goodly creatures are there here!
How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world,
That has such people in ’t!

March 25, 2015

A Pill for Compassion or Misunderstood Science?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

For at least a decade, studies have shown that empathy and compassion decline in medical students.…

March 12, 2015

War Against Science 2.0: If You Can’t Beat ‘Em, Ban ‘Em

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

That’s the good thing about science: It’s true whether or not you believe in it. That’s why it works-Neil deGrasse Tyson

The data of climate change is very strong: warmest average years on record, increasing extreme weather, higher carbon dioxide levels, changes in sea level, increasing droughts, decreasing snowpacks and sea ice, melting glaciers and permafrost, warmer oceans and increasing ocean acidity.…

October 28, 2014

If no travel restrictions, then….quarantine?

As the Ebola epidemic rages on, the debate about travel limitations has moved inevitably to the next stage: whether there ought to be a quarantine imposed on healthcare providers and others returning from service in endemic areas. We have been reading two opposing views, one emphasizing, as did Governor Christie of New Jersey, that “the obligation of elected officials is to protect the public health... // Read More »
June 12, 2014

How Old Are You? Philosophy of Age and Its Relevance for Bioethics

by J.S. Blumenthal-Barby, Ph.D.

How old are you?

Robert Pogue Harrison, Literature Professor at Stanford University, recently reflected on this question during a monologue on his radio show, “Entitled Opinions.” (Plug for this great show, by the way:

Strikingly, he makes the case that although several scholars have offered a philosophy of time (most notably Martin Heidegger), a philosophical analysis of age has been lacking.…

June 6, 2014

Getting An Earful

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the book (and film) Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton, dinosaur DNA from in insects that bit the dinosaurs and are now preserved in amber.…

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Published Articles (3)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 4 - Apr 2015

Ideology and Microbiology: Ebola, Science, and Deliberative Democracy Joseph J. Fins

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

If I Could Just Stop Loving You: Anti-Love Biotechnology and the Ethics of a Chemical Breakup Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

The Difficult Case of Voluntariness as Autonomy in Anti-Love Biotechnology Hywote Taye

News (89)

September 23, 2015 6:01 pm

You’re surrounded by a cloud of bacteria as unique as a fingerprint

Do you ever feel like you’re all alone in the world? Well, don’t. At every moment of your life, you’re surrounded by a cloud of bacteria. These microbial companions are so unique to you that the cloud — which you leave traces of everywhere you go — might actually be as identifiable as a fingerprint.

September 14, 2015 4:47 pm

Military's Prosthetic Hand Can Feel

In the first series of tests, researchers gently touched each finger of the prosthetic hand while the man was wearing a blindfold.  He was able to state with nearly 100-percent accuracy which finger was being touched, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, better known as DARPA, said in a statement Friday.

September 10, 2015 5:10 pm

Stanford scientists produce cancer drug from rare plant in lab to benefit human health

Stanford scientists produced a common cancer drug – previously only available from an endangered plant – in a common laboratory plant. This work could lead to a more stable supply of the drug and allow scientists to manipulate that drug to make it even safer and more effective.

May 26, 2015 3:55 pm

Berkeley Robot Learns Through Trial and Error (Like Humans)

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a robot capable of learning new skills through trial and error.

April 27, 2015 1:59 pm

Decline in U.S. science spending threatens economy, security: MIT

Warning of an “innovation deficit,” scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology say declining government spending on basic research is holding back potentially life-saving advances in 15 fields, from robotics and fusion energy to Alzheimer’s disease and agriculture.

April 14, 2015 2:15 pm

Academics rate women job applicants higher than identical men: study

When hundreds of U.S. college faculty members rated junior scientists based on scholarly record, job interview performance and other information with an eye toward which should be hired, they preferred women over identically qualified men two-to-one, scientists reported on Monday.

March 30, 2015 6:57 pm

Grants help level the playing field for young moms in science

Thanks to a generous benefactor, young mothers doing laboratory research at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston can receive major grants to keep them from falling behind while they raise their children.

March 12, 2015 6:38 pm

Solar plane aiming for first round-the-world flight lands in India

The first round-the-world solar-powered flight landed in India on Wednesday, the second leg of a 35,000 km (22,000 mile) journey seeking to demonstrate that flying long distances fueled by renewable energy is possible.

March 10, 2015 6:43 pm

Electric 'noise' treats Parkinson's symptoms

A wearable device that stimulates the sense of balance with electric “noise” could help Parkinson’s disease patients, according to Swedish scientists.

February 24, 2015 8:08 pm

The challenge – and opportunity – of regulating new ideas in science and technology

Innovation in science and technology holds promise to improve our lives. But disruptive business models, do-it-yourself medical devices, and open platforms also introduce corporate and personal risks. How can the public stay safe from unknown consequences as a company’s product or service matures? In a recent panel co-sponsored by Stanford’s Rock Center for Corporate Governance and Center for Law and the Biosciences, experts in law, business, and ethics discussed what happens when science and technology outrun the law.

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