Hot Topics: Social Justice

Blog Posts (35)

April 24, 2017

BioethicsTV: Henrietta Lacks and “Mary Kills People”

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

This past weekend was a bioethics bonanza when it came to cable television. First, HBO premiered its film version of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, seven years after the book’s original publication.…

April 17, 2017

A Bioethics View of Executions in Arkansas

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

This week the state of Arkansas had planned to execute 8 death-row inmates in 4, back-to-back killings using lethal injection over 10 days.…

April 4, 2017

A Lesson in Humanism to Medical Students Prompted by a Mass Casualty Event

by Sergio Salazar, MD, MBE

The purpose of this editorial is to reveal how one of the most tragic events in our nation’s history helped teach future medical providers the influence that humanistic actions can have on relieving suffering and forward healing.…

March 29, 2017

I am a refugee, an immigrant and an American

Our Managing Editor, Bela Fishbeyn published a very moving account of her experiences as an immigrant to the United States. This highlights the schizophrenic nature of our nation’s attitudes and history towards immigrants and refugees.…

March 21, 2017

Intersectionality and the Dangers of White Empathy when Treating Black Patients

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

(Originally presented at the 7th International Health Humanities Consortium meeting in Houston, Texas)

I’ve had many odd, seemingly racially motivated experiences with racially uneducated and racially insensitive doctors and nurses.…

March 17, 2017

Ethics of the Trump Budget: The Social Contract is Dead

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

President Trump released his blueprint for a 2018 federal budget. From an ethical standpoint, the President seems to operates from a Hobbesian standpoint—life is nasty, brutish and short.…

February 21, 2017

Ethics, refugees, and the President’s Executive Order

by Nancy Kass, ScD
There are different political philosophies about the responsibilities of states regarding whether to accept refugees. While there is a political philosophy that might be called Nationalist in perspective that says, essentially, “Not my Problem,” the predominant philosophy globally is different.…

February 13, 2017

Fallout: From Healthcare Equality to Existential Threat

by Jenji Cassandra Learn

This is the second in a series of personal articles about living as a trans-woman facing insurance denial, discrimination, and medical mistreatment in the current political environment.

February 10, 2017

Stoking the Flames of Competitiveness on an Overheating Planet

STUDENT VOICES By: Michael Aprea This essay is in response to the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs video “Climate Protectionism and Competitiveness.”   Steam put the world in motion. It lit up the night, and tightened humanity’s grasp on the forces of nature. Nature, however, has eluded the human race and has forced civilization to reconsider … More Stoking the Flames of Competitiveness on an Overheating Planet
January 30, 2017

Bioethics and the Problem of Silent Neutrality in the age of Trump

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

One of the most contentious of all issues in bioethics has been whether as a profession, we should take a stand against issues.…

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Published Articles (9)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Psychiatric Genomics and Mental Health Treatment: Setting the Ethical Agenda Camillia Kong, Michael Dunn & Michael Parker

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

Diagnosis by Documentary: Professional Responsibilities in Informal Encounters Alistair Wardrope & Markus Reuber

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 7 Issue 3 - Jul 2016

Promoting equity through health systems research in low- and middle-income countries: Practices of researchers Bridget Pratt, Katharine A. Allen & Adnan A. Hyder

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 6 - Jun 2016

Not Just “Study Drugs” for the Rich: Stimulants as Moral Tools for Creating Opportunities for Socially Disadvantaged Students Keisha Shantel Ray

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 6 - Jun 2016

Clinical Trials Infrastructure as a Quality Improvement Intervention in Low- and Middle-Income Countries Avram Denburg, Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo & Steven Joffe

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 6 - Jun 2016

The Potential for Infrastructure Benefits and the Responsiveness Requirement David Wendler

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 5 - May 2016

The Paradigm of the Paradox: Women, Pregnant Women, and the Unequal Burdens of the Zika Virus Pandemic Lisa H. Harris, Neil S. Silverman & Mary Faith Marshall

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 4 - Apr 2016

The Unbearable Whiteness of Bioethics: Exhorting Bioethicists to Address Racism Kayhan Parsi

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 4 - Apr 2016

Bioethicists Can and Should Contribute to Addressing Racism Marion Danisa, Yolonda Wilson & Amina White

News (14)

April 4, 2017 9:00 am

HIV infections are spiking among young gay Chinese (Science)

A dramatic rise in HIV infections among young gay men in China has belatedly captured the attention of both national and local authorities. Although the total number of people infected with HIV remains below 1 million nationwide, the government recently reported that of the 96,000 new cases identified in the first 9 months of 2016, 28% were traced to male homosexual activity, up from 2.5% of new cases in 2006.

March 30, 2017 9:00 am

Gates Foundation announces open-access publishing venture (Nature)

One of the world’s wealthiest charities, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle, Washington, is set to launch its own open-access publishing venture later this year. The initiative, Gates Open Research, was announced on 23 March and will be modelled on a service begun last year by the London-based biomedical charity, the Wellcome Trust. Like that effort, the Gates Foundation’s platform is intended to accelerate the publication of articles and data from research funded by the charity.

February 15, 2017 9:00 am

This stereotype is killing black children (Washington Post)

USA Swimming, the nation’s organizing body for the sport, has some 337,000 members — of whom only 1.3 percent are black. Today, nearly 60 years after the abolishment of Jim Crow laws that kept African Americans from pools and safe swimming places, many children still never get the chance to swim.

January 30, 2017 9:00 am

Journals invite too few women to referee (Nature)

Using a large data set that includes the genders and ages of authors and reviewers from 2012 to 2015 for the journals of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), we show that women were used less as reviewers than expected (on the basis of their proportion of membership of the society and as published authors in AGU journals). The bias is a result of authors and editors, especially male ones, suggesting women as reviewers less often, and a slightly higher decline rate among women in each age group when asked.

November 10, 2016 10:52 am

U.S. watchdog told Medicare, Medicaid that EpiPen was misclassified in 2009: senator (Reuters)

The internal watchdog at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services warned the office tasked with administering federal health insurance programs that Mylan NV’s EpiPen was improperly classified as a generic drug in 2009, Senator Charles Grassley said on Tuesday.

October 31, 2016 8:00 am

The controversial DNA search that helped nab the 'Grim Sleeper' is winning over skeptics (LA Times)

The “Roaming Rapist” is one of a handful of cases that California authorities have quietly solved in recent years using a controversial technique that scours an offender DNA database for a father, son or brother of an elusive crime suspect.

October 28, 2016 8:00 am

Big pharma is gearing up to defend drug prices (Washington Post)

The skyrocketing costs of prescription drugs has been noticeably absent from discussion in the presidential debates — even as bipartisan anger about price gouging has united Congress. But the trade group for the pharmaceutical industry, PhRMA, is gearing up to defend drug prices after the election, seeking an additional $100 million in annual dues from its members, according to a report from Politico.

August 22, 2016 8:00 am

Justice Department says it will end use of private prisons (Washington Post)

The Justice Department plans to end its use of private prisons after officials concluded the facilities are both less safe and less effective at providing correctional services than those run by the government.

July 14, 2016 8:44 am

CDC needs to break silence on gun violence, say African American health officials (CNN)

As an African-American man, Dr. Georges Benjamin says he feels like “an endangered species,” due to gun violence claiming the lives of men his color disproportionately to their numbers.

July 12, 2016 8:36 am

Women Doctors Are Paid $20,000 Less Than Male Doctors (Time)

In academic medicine, female full professors earn the same amount as male associate professors.

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