Get Published | Subscribe | About | Write for Our Blog    

Posted on December 3, 2019 at 5:21 AM

The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) had a recent Perspective on proposed bill H.R. 3 aimed at reducing federal spending on prescription drugs. A main component in the bill authorizes the Secretary of Health and Human Services to establish a “Fair Price Negotiation Program” that, beginning in 2023, would permit the secretary to negotiate with pharmaceutical companies the price paid by the federal government on 25 drugs each year. The article provides a broad overview of the bill as it discusses some of the economic pros and cons as well as the political back and forth that would be required to allow this bill to become law. The link is behind a subscription firewall but provides an option for free access to a limited number of articles with registration.

Call me cynical but anytime I see the word “fair” associated with a bill in Congress, I immediately wonder “for whom?” The article is quick to point out that the “negotiation” effectively means “price regulation and severe penalty for noncompliance” by the drug manufacturers. The article describes in general the method that will be used to set the maximum price of a given drug. How or why did Congress determine that method as the best for determining the Fair Price? Also, not all drugs will be included in the group subjected to negotiation. If it is good or fair (as determined by Congress) for drug prices to be determined/set/negotiated by our government, should not all drugs be negotiated similarly so they are fairly priced?

Bills like H.R. 3 are part of the larger discussion of what I call the ultimate “Rights vs. Obligations” in the delivery of healthcare. If healthcare is a human right, who is obliged to provide that right? In the present case of medication pricing, if the present cost of a drug is too high, who is obliged to offset that cost (read – pay the difference between “too high” and “fair”)? The provision of healthcare, generally, and the creation, testing and production of medications, specifically, have real costs. Are these costs fair? Who will pay these costs? The patient? The doctor? The hospital? The pharmaceutical industry? Should healthcare be for-profit? If so, how much profit? Should healthcare become a utility with strict(er) oversight? Can the market decide a fair cost or price? Can a utility board? Can our elected representatives? How about a group of really (and I mean really) smart, unelected bureaucrats?

Thoughtful answers to any one of these questions should be submitted immediately to your local congressperson. Collectively, they are presently the ones determining fairness (in a real bioethical sense) in healthcare.

Comments are closed.