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by Prof Dominic Wilkinson @Neonatalethics Last month, in an emergency hearing, the High court in London heard a case that characterises a familiar problem in medical ethics. A 15 year old adolescent (known as ‘X’) with a long-standing medical condition, Sickle Cell disease, had a very low blood count and required an urgent blood transfusion. […]

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On Monday night, Germany's public broadcaster ARD showed "Gott," a movie about whether a healthy adult should have access to medical aid in dying. The movie is based on the play and book of the same name by Ferdinand von Schirach.The film depicts ...

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by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In 1862, the Morrill Act provided for the building of land grant universities throughout the country. Their purpose was to make higher education, especially in agriculture and technical arts, available to people who previously would not have had access. With a single act, higher education went from being a pursuit of the elite to an opportunity available to many. However, it was not until the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944 (the GI Bill), that higher education became available to large numbers of people because the cost was covered by the United States government. From 1944-1949, nearly 6 million veterans attended college at a cost of $6 billion to the government.…

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Ms Justice Mary Irvine of the Irish High Court has ruled that a hospital is entitled to withhold invasive interventions and administer a palliative care regime to a profoundly brain-injured boy should his condition substantially deteriorate.John’s pare...

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In his recent piece, “The genes we’re dealt,” Erik Parens puts his finger on cause for concern with what he calls social genomics: while progressives can use insights from this new field to justify combating inequality, conservatives can use them to justify the existence of that same inequality. This pessimistic conclusion—which Parens argues convincingly for—follows from a focus on insights at the societal level, that of a whole population. But there are grounds for optimism by focusing instead on potential insights from social genomics derived from local-level comparisons between different environments. Such insights could point to interventions that progressives and conservatives might just be able to agree on.

The post A Narrow Path for Optimism that Social Genomics Can Combat Inequality appeared first on The Hastings Center.

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Many states limit the right of pregnant women to direct the withholding or withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment in an advance directive. In some states, organ-sustaining treatment may not be withheld or withdrawn even after a pregnant woman has been...

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by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Good Doctor (Season 4: Episodes 1-3); Chicago Med (Season 6; Episode 1-2);Greys Anatomy (Season 17: Episodes 1-3): The COVID Episodes. 

This spring and summer there was a question about whether there would be a fall television season. The usual busy spring filming season was delayed due to COVID-19 and for some shows, production was canceled. While editing and adding sound can be done remotely, filming multiple actors on a well-known set can only be done in person. With the premiere of many shows, how did the showrunners manage to film in the pandemic? The answers are varied and expected.…

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Charlie Gard's parents famously contested a hospital's plans to withdraw life-sustaining treatment from their baby. They litigated the case (unsuccessfully) through three levels of UK courts and even to the European Court of Human Rights...

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Earlier this month, the New Jersey Commission on Professionalism in the Law awarded a 2020 professionalism award to the Honorable Paul W. Armstrong.While serving as a Somerset County Superior Court judge for 18 years, Armstrong presided over many notab...

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The procurement of human plasma as a potential therapy for Covid-19 is one of the latest examples of bioethics nationalism, defined by Jonathan Moreno in this blog as “distinct bioethics standards [which] are formally proclaimed as a matter of right by a sovereign state.” The race for a Covid cure pushes at the weak seams in the international liberal order in much the same way that Covid appears to be pushing at health care systems.

The post Human Plasma and Bioethics Nationalism appeared first on The Hastings Center.

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