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Author Archive: Craig Klugman

About Craig Klugman


by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Steven Stryker was 75 years old when he died on May 13 at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Tampa. His death was not avoided when health care providers did not perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Stryker had a DNR order even though he, his daughter, and his health care surrogate did not want it. Stryker had some capacity and some deficits, and a court-appointed a professional guardian to control his affairs. That guardian allegedly has a policy of always putting DNR orders on her wards, and thus, Stryker died. The patient, his daughter, his health care power of attorney, and his psychiatrist were all against the DNR.…

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by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Few people would say that the system of payment and organ distribution is perfect. About 37 million Americans suffer from kidney disease and 94,831 are candidates (as of July 10, 2019) for kidney transplant. In 2018, 21,167 kidney transplants and 836 combined kidney/pancreas transplants were performed in the U.S. Many ESRD patients (468,000) receive dialysis treatment, usually in privately owned clinics, while 193,000 have received a transplant. The system of distribution of kidneys was changed a year ago, when the system sought to increase the number of successful transplants by decreasing the amount of time a hospital has to accept or refuse an organ.…

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by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Wednesday and Thursday nights this week saw a gathering of twenty candidates pursuing the Democratic nomination to run for President of the United States in 2020. Each night, ten candidates discussed hot button issues and current events that are of importance to many Americans. Many of these topics have direct bearing on bioethics and health.

In the area of bioethics, most of the candidates stated that there is a lack of ethical or moral foundation in the executive branch. This is not a call for religion, but rather an acknowledgement of the many conflicts of interest and cases of corruption that define the daily operations of the current administration.…

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by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Procreative liberty is an important right in the United States that is frequently under attack these days. As first defined by John Roberts, JD, procreative liberty is the freedom to decide for oneself whether or not to have children. Protecting procreative liberty is important not just for a situation like being able to choose abortion, but also because procreative liberty is about having autonomy over one’s own body. For example, in 1979, China instituted the one child policy—a couple could only legally have a single child—in order to curb exponential population growth. To enforce this policy, couples (mostly in urban areas) were coerced into having abortions, people frequently chose to abort fetuses of the wrong sex, and families with more than one child found themselves hit with punishments that included a loss of health care and education.…

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by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

A controversy last week erupted out of freshman New York Congressperson Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Instagram Live appearance and follow-up tweet saying that the facilities where the federal government is keeping detained children are “concentration camps.”

The Border Patrol Chief immediately called Ocasio-Cortez’s use of the term, “offensive”. The Israeli Holocaust Museum Yad Vashem, Senator Bernie Sanders, and New York Mayor Bill de Blasio felt the term was not appropriate and diminishes what happened in the Holocaust. Others have stated that the correct term is “detention center” since these are people alleged to have broken the law.…

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by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In 1983, NBC broadcast an alien invasion limited series calledV. In one episode, as the U.S. devolves into a tyranny, the military invades scientific labs and finds—inside the filing cabinets (it was pre-computer days)—cures for cancer and other diseases that were simply never released because companies made more money treating disease than curing it. From that 36 year old television image has come a modern reality—Pfizer may have a drug that improves the chances of preventing Alzheimer’s Disease, but they won’t pay for the clinical testing.

Enbrel is a $5 billion per year prescribed biologic medication approved in 1998 for rheumatoid arthritis.…

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by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week, the World Health Organization (WHO) re-defined workplace burnout as a syndrome consisting of “feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion; increased mental distance from one’s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one’s job; and reduced professional efficacy.”  The change still does not define burnout as a medical problem and it is not new since it appears in the International Classification of Diseases version 10 as well. What it does is provide a focus on the increasing stress that we face by jobs that demand more time, effort and productivity while giving us less in return.…

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by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In 2017, Texas passed an abortion burial law. As part of Texas Senate Bill 8 , this provision would have required that health care facilities ensure that an aborted embryo or fetus was treated like all human remains. This means the remains would have to be handled by a funeral director and disposed of via burial or cremation. The remains could not be disposed alongside medical waste, which is incinerated. This law never took effect as a federal judge ruled the requirement adds “significant burdens on women seeking an abortion or experiencing pregnancy loss” and that it conveyed “minimal, if any, benefits.”

This week, however, the U.S.…

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by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

I am a man writing about abortion. I am a bioethicist outraged that a bunch of JDeities believe they know more about medicine than doctors, and more about a woman’s body than a woman living in her body. I am a citizen incensed that a bunch of legislators are trying to force their narrow view of morality on a nation that has prided itself on freedom and individual liberty. I am a scholar petrified that these moves are intended to favor one religion over all others and to subjugate women to second class citizen status.

The story begins in 2003 when the U.S.…

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by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 22): Max’s Impossible Choice<; Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 21): Choosing between life and certain death

New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 22): Max’s Impossible Choice

Max Goodwin is at home resting from his chemotherapy after stepping down temporarily from his medical director position. Dr. Bloom knocks on the door to talk to him and finds Max covered in blood, his wife’s. Georgia is fairly far along in her pregnancy and has experienced previa: She is bleeding out. Max calls for an ambulance which seems to be impossibly far away and unable to get there.…

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