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At Long Last: FDA Changes the Law for Hemochromatosis

06/22/2015

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

Summer in the U.S. is known for many things—time at the beach, picnics, baseball, thunderstorms, vacations and ice cream. Sadly, it is also known by hospitals as the season when blood is in short supply. Schools and businesses close making blood drives harder. Frequent donors go away leaving blood and blood products in their communities in short supply. That is why a recent hard-fought breakthrough as to who can donate blood deserves much more attention and recognition than it has received which, if Google is to be believed, to date has been exactly nothing.…

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07/01/2015
California Mom Christy O’Donnell Fights to Die on Her Own Terms

A terminally ill single mom who has been given months to live is fighting the state of California for the right to die. Now, a judge has ordered an expedited review of her suit, which will be heard later this month.

06/30/2015
Supreme Court Allows Use of Controversial Sedative for Lethal Injection

On Monday, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in the case of Glossip v. Gross, deciding that it is indeed constitutional to use the controversial execution drug midazolam for death penalty sentences fulfilled by lethal injection — the same drug that was used as a sedative in botched executions over the last two years.

06/29/2015
U.S. Congress Moves to Block Human Embryo Editing

The US House of Representatives is wading into the debate over whether human embryos should be modified to introduce heritable changes. Its fiscal year 2016 spending bill for the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) would prohibit the agency from spending money to evaluate research or clinical applications for such products.

06/26/2015
U.S. Supreme Court upholds federal health care law

Three years after narrowly surviving a legal challenge, President Obama’s signature health insurance law faced another threat to its survival in much of the nation Thursday before a U.S. Supreme Court led by conservative Republican appointees. The health law prevailed, with something to spare, an apparent signal of its future endurance.