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Insider Report: NIH Alters Pre-Award Human Subjects Concerns Reporting; IRBs Not Told

02/21/2018

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

On February 16, 2018, bioethics.net received an NIH memo sent to program officers on the same day. The missive came from the NIH OER Communications Office and was signed by Michael S. Lauer, MD, the NIH Deputy Director for Extramural Research:

Effective Tuesday February 20, 2018, NIH is changing how we handle pre-award human subject concerns identified during peer review to streamline administrative processes associated with making grant and R&D contract awards. Responsibility for review and approval of finalized human subjects’ research protocols vests with the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of record.

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02/23/2018
Nursing homes sedate residents with dementia by misusing antipsychotic drugs, report finds CNN

Former administrators admitted doling out drugs without having appropriate diagnoses, securing informed consent or divulging risks.

02/22/2018
Intergenerational care: Where kids help the elderly live longer CNN

“The children work with and play with the residents every single day,” said Ali Somers, co-founder of Apples and Honey Nightingale, who also heads evaluation and impact for this program. The premise is intergenerational care, providing wisdom to the young and relationships — and, in turn, longevity — to the old.

02/21/2018
Find drugs that delay many diseases of old age Nature

A class of drugs called geroprotectors might be able to delay the onset of concurrent age-related diseases (multimorbidity) and boost resilience. In various animal models, these drugs can ward off problems of the heart, muscles, immune system and more.

02/20/2018
Genome editor CRISPR’s latest trick? Offering a sharper snapshot of activity inside the cell Science

Airplane flight recorders and body cameras help investigators make sense of complicated events. Biologists studying cells have tried to build their own data recorders, for example by linking the activity of a gene of interest to one making a fluorescent protein. Their goal is to clarify processes such as the emergence of cancer, aging, environmental impacts, and embryonic development.