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Author Archive: Jon Holmlund

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05/04/2018

More on genetic medicine

The third and final installment from The Code, a series of 3 short documentaries on the internet about the origins of genetic medicine, is entitled “Selling the Code.”  This is about genetic testing to try to predict risks of diseases, among other things.  Doctors use some of this testing in clinical care and a burgeoning amount of research.  A number of companies, such as 23andMe,... // Read More »

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04/25/2018

Raiding the CRISPR

The second installment from The Code, a series of 3 short documentaries on the internet about the origins of genetic medicine, addresses gene editing.  The current approach to this exploits “CRISPR,” or “Clustered Regularly Interspersed Short Palindromic Repeats,” DNA sequences initially discovered as a sort of bacterial immune system but very efficient at editing out undesirable genetic features, such as disease susceptibility mutations in plants... // Read More »

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04/05/2018

New short videos on genetic topics

This week, an email from the Hastings Center promoted The Code, a series of 3 short documentaries on the internet about the origins of genetic medicine.  The three are being released one week at a time.  The first, released this week, briefly (12 minutes) reviews the determination, or sequencing, of the entire human genome, a project conducted in the 1990’s, and completed in 2000, by... // Read More »

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03/29/2018

Toward true public engagement about gene editing

The March 22, 2018 edition of Nature includes two thoughtful, helpful commentaries about improving the public dialogue around “bleeding edge” biotechnologies.  In this case, the example is gene editing, of which one commentator, Simon Burall from the U.K., says, “Like artificial intelligence, gene editing could radically alter almost every domain of life.”  Burall’s piece, “Don’t wait for an outcry about gene editing,” can be found... // Read More »

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03/23/2018

Resources regarding ethics of gene editing

Recently, two resources have become available regarding gene editing and the issues raised by it. First, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine have made available an archive of its February 22 webinar about human gene editing.  The home page for the Academies’ human gene-editing initiative is here.  A link to the archived webinar is here.  The slides can also just be viewed here.... // Read More »

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03/09/2018

Doctor-assisted death: resisting the slippery slope

The New England Journal of Medicine has two new “op-ed”-style pieces raising concerns about extending physician-assisted suicide (PAS) from people with end-stage terminal illness to people who may express a desire to die because of (non-terminal) mental illness.  (Regrettably, both require subscription access.)  PAS in these cases is being exercised in Belgium and the Netherlands, and is being considered in Canada In one article, the... // Read More »

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02/23/2018

Reviewing the ethics of paying human research subjects

Sometimes it is both necessary and proper to pay a person to participate in a clinical trial, of a drug or some other medical intervention, or a data-collection study, or something else that involves people.  An article in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine reviews many of the relevant ethical issues. A link to the article is here.  Correction to initial post:  subscription or... // Read More »

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02/23/2018

Reviewing the ethics of paying human research subjects

Sometimes it is both necessary and proper to pay a person to participate in a clinical trial, of a drug or some other medical intervention, or a data-collection study, or something else that involves people.  An article in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine reviews many of the relevant ethical issues. A link to the article is here.  Correction to initial post:  subscription or... // Read More »

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02/01/2018

Fertility with frozen eggs: not a sure thing

In case you didn’t see it, the Washington Post has this story about how more women are trying to improve their overall chances of having a baby—particularly in the later reproductive years of their 30’s and 40’s—but success is far from certain.  Human oocytes (eggs) are fragile things, and it was not until recent years that freezing techniques developed to a point that would allow... // Read More »

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01/24/2018

Update on clinical studies of human gene editing

The January 22 edition of The Wall Street Journal carried an article the essential message of which was, “the Chinese are ahead of us in gene editing.”  Specifically, more human clinical trials are active in China than in the US using gene editing in some form to treat people with specific diseases.  Some of these trials use the “hot, new” CRISPR-Cas9 approach to gene editing. ... // Read More »

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