Blog RSS Blog.

02/27/2017

Googling PAS

While researching physician assisted suicide legislation this past week, I noticed something odd when I Googled the topic. After I typed “physician assisted” into Google, the search engine’s autocomplete function suggested searches related to “physician assisted death.” I then started to type out “physician assisted suicide,” but as soon as I typed the “s,” all suggestions disappeared. Out of curiosity, I visited Google Trends to... // Read More »

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Janie Valentine. Bookmark the permalink.

02/27/2017

Googling PAS

While researching physician assisted suicide legislation this past week, I noticed something odd when I Googled the topic. After I typed “physician assisted” into Google, the search engine’s autocomplete function suggested searches related to “physician assisted death.” I then started to type out “physician assisted suicide,” but as soon as I typed the “s,” all suggestions disappeared. Out of curiosity, I visited Google Trends to... // Read More »

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Janie Valentine. Bookmark the permalink.

02/26/2017

Of Value Only if Desired

It’s becoming more and more apparent that conflicted cultural attitudes toward abortion arise from inconsistent—even contradictory—beliefs about the moral value and status of the pre-born human being. Consider two recent news items. The whole world knows by now that wildly popular performer Beyoncé is pregnant with twins. Her performance at the Grammy Awards was dedicated to “birth and motherhood.” She’s even composed a poem celebrating... // Read More »

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Philip Thompson. Bookmark the permalink.

02/26/2017

Of Value Only if Desired

It’s becoming more and more apparent that conflicted cultural attitudes toward abortion arise from inconsistent—even contradictory—beliefs about the moral value and status of the pre-born human being. Consider two recent news items. The whole world knows by now that wildly popular performer Beyoncé is pregnant with twins. Her performance at the Grammy Awards was dedicated to “birth and motherhood.” She’s even composed a poem celebrating... // Read More »

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Philip Thompson. Bookmark the permalink.

02/26/2017

Rhode Island Medical Journal on VSED

There is a nice op-ed on VSED in the February 2017 issue of the Rhode Island Medical Journal.   The author (Herbert Rakatansky) encourages facilities to "formulate and have policies about VSED in place."

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

02/25/2017

Upcoming VSED Conference

The University of North Carolina Charlotte Ethics Center is cosponsoring a conference at the Center City Building on April 6, 2017 on VSED as an end-of-life care option.   VSED - voluntarily stopping eating and drinking - is a legal option f...

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

02/24/2017

Good facts, calm deliberation, and wise counsel

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored” – Aldous Huxley, Proper Studies (1927)

A recent exchange on the bioethics listserv began with a panicked message that the Presidential bioethics commissions website (bioethics.gov) has gone dark. A flurry of messages asked what this might mean for bioethics and for meaningful moral discourse in the Trump administration. Soon, cooler heads prevailed explaining that Georgetown retains the repository of all of the several commissions and that the website came down on January 20, at the transition of power. When there is a transition of administration, it is standard (in the internet age) for websites to come down from old programs and to change while new staff and programs are instituted.…

Full Article

This entry was posted in Ethics, Featured Posts, Philosophy & Ethics, professional ethics, Science and tagged . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

02/24/2017

Disrupting the Death Care Paradigm: Challenges to the Regulation of the Funeral Industry and the American Way of Death

Wake Forest University School of Law is hosting a symposium today:  "Disrupting the Death
Care Paradigm: Challenges to the Regulation of the Funeral Industry and the American Way of Death."

There have been a number of academic conferences addressing death and deathcare, but this symposium is unique because it is focused on the very active legal, political, and grassroots challenges to the funeral industry and the dominant paradigm of death care in this country. 

There are two main fronts of challenge to the existing paradigm – first, from those primarily concerned with the occupational licensing regime that shapes the funeral industry and the choices available to the public (i.e. court challenges to the casket laws and the ready to embalm laws); and second, from those primarily concerned with promoting new methods of memorialization and disposition. 

PART I: CHALLENGES TO THE REGULATION OF THE FUNERAL INDUSTRY

Regulated to Death: Re-Imagining the Funeral Services Market -  Tanya D. Marsh, Professor of Law, Wake Forest University School of Law

Taking the Pulse of Funeral Markets: The Effects of Government Regulations and Private Agents on Funeral MarketsDavid Harrington, Himmelright Professorship in Economics, Kenyon College

Economic Liberty: Constitutional Challenges to Funeral Director Licensing LawsJeff Rowes, Senior Attorney, Institute for Justice

There is a Funeral Rule for a Reason: Why it Matters and Why it Needs Modernizing Josh Slocum, Executive Director, Funeral Consumers Alliance

Panel Discussion: Challenges to Regulation of the Funeral IndustryDavid Harrington, Tanya Marsh, Jeff Rowes & Josh Slocum


PART II: CHALLENGES TO THE AMERICAN WAY OF DEATH

Jessica Mitford was Wrong Tanya D. Marsh, Professor of Law, Wake Forest University School of Law

Why Caring for Our Own Dead is an Act of Social Justice - Lee Webster, Director, New Hampshire Funeral Resources, Education & Advocacy; President, National Home Funeral Alliance

Basic Cremation: White Bones, Black Boxes, and Alkaline Hydrolysis - Philip Olson, Assistant Professor, Department of Science and Technology in Society, Virginia Tech

A Funeral Entrepreneur’s Experience: What Needs to ChangeAmy Cunningham, Fitting Tribute Funeral Services, New York City

 
Panel Discussion: Challenges to the American Way of Death - Amy Cunningham, Caitlin Doughty, Tanya Marsh, Philip Olson, & Lee Webster

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

02/24/2017

BioethicsTV: Substituted Judgment

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

On Grey’s Anatomy (Season 13, Episode 14) two cases lead to questions about who makes decisions for patients. In the first story, a young woman wanders into the ED disoriented and talking about snakes in a hat to denote to the viewer that she has a mental illness and lacks capacity. She is filthy, homeless, and lacks identification. The woman collapses because her very old pacemaker malfunctions. Two cardiologists in the room agree that she needs the surgery and this is all that the viewer sees of consent. There is no interaction with social work or calls to the police to identify her, to look for missing persons reports, or to circulate her image and description.…

Full Article