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05/04/2015

A Case for Viewing The Baltimore Protests as a Bioethics Issue

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Freddie Gray’s Death
On April 12, 2015, Freddie Gray, a twenty-five year old black man was arrested and placed in a police van in Baltimore, Maryland for carrying a switchblade (Baltimore State Attorney, Marilyn Mosby later announced that Gray was legally carrying a knife). Perhaps one of the more troubling aspects of Gray’s fateful police van ride was that officers reportedly observed Gray’s unresponsive body on the floor of the police van but still did not take him to see a medic.

By the time Gray reached the Western District Police Station, according to District Attorney Mosby, he was no longer breathing and a medic was called.…

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This entry was posted in Cultural, Featured Posts, Health Disparities and tagged , , , . Posted by Bonsai Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

05/03/2015

“Reasonable Profits” For Pharmaceutical Manufacturers?

<p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:200%"><span style="line-height: 200%; font-size: 11.1999998092651px;">With the recent success of the blockbuster drug Sovaldi© (Gilead Sciences, Inc.), the manufacturer’s <a href="https://www.google.com/#q=gilead+sciences+stock+price">stock price</a> has quintupled in the last four years. </span><span style="line-height: 200%; font-size: 11.1999998092651px;">This supports the views of some that pharmaceutical prices in America should be subject to <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/28/us/obama-proposes-that-medicare-be-given-the-right-to-negotiate-the-cost-of-drugs.html">greater government scrutiny</a> and controls like other industrialized countries.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:200%"><span style="line-height: 200%; font-size: 11.1999998092651px;">High profits within the pharmaceutical industry are nothing new. “Historically [before the recent recession], the drug industry in America has been the </span><a style="line-height: 200%; font-size: 11.1999998092651px;" href="http://www.cluteinstitute.com/ojs/index.php/JBER/article/view/2640">top performing</a><span style="line-height: 200%; font-size: 11.1999998092651px;"> [sector] in terms of return on revenues (average 18.6%) and return on assets (average 17.7%) compared to 4.9% and 3.9% respectively for median companies in the Fortune 500 industries.” </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:200%"><span style="line-height: 200%; font-size: 11.1999998092651px;">The <a href="http://www.pnhp.org/sites/default/files/docs/2011/Biosocieties_2011_Myths_of_High_Drug_Research_Costs.pdf">extremely high costs</a> of drug research and development (R&amp;D) are often cited as the principal rationale for allowing an above average return and minimizing government price controls. </span><span style="line-height: 200%; font-size: 11.1999998092651px;">However, studies have shown that “[as t]o the question of whether pharmaceutical drugs costs are justified by R&amp;D, the answer is no. Pharmaceutical firms do indeed invest money in R&amp;D, as do other production and service firms, but this investment <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1536-7150.2011.00820.x/abstract">does not account for</a> their large ongoing profit, which ranges from 2.5 to 37 times the non-pharmaceutical industry average over time.”</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:200%"><span style="line-height: 200%; font-size: 11.1999998092651px;"><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"> </span></span></p>

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This entry was posted in Health Care, Pharmaceuticals and tagged , , , . Posted by Hayley Dittus-Doria. Bookmark the permalink.

05/02/2015

Savannah Law Review Symposium: The Walking Dead

The Savannah Law Review is looking for papers for their September The Walking Dead, on September 18-19, 2015 symposium,

The symposium will survey academic topics about how death, and fear of death, affects the law of the living.  The Walking Dead Colloquium will provide a forum to discuss the “shadowy” legal interpolation of the dead on the living and explore both its positive and negative ramifications in an effort to strike a pluralistic balance between the law of past, present, and future.  Thematic examples include:

  • Legal recognition of the dead’s wishes affecting real property and intellectual property
  • Regulation of pandemics from yellow fever to Ebola
  • Constitutional analysis relying upon views of the dead—the Framers—versus a “living” Constitution
  • The death penalty
  • Desecration laws
  • The Right to Die Movement
  • Posthumous evidentiary privileges
  • Wrongful death and rights of survivorship
  • Regulation of corpses, organ donation, and burials
  • Stigma harms to real property inhabited by ghosts
  • Post-apocalyptic justice.

Abstracts no longer than 500 words are due by August 1, 2015.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

05/02/2015

Savannah Law Review Symposium: The Walking Dead

The Savannah Law Review is looking for papers for their September The Walking Dead, on September 18-19, 2015 symposium,

The symposium will survey academic topics about how death, and fear of death, affects the law of the living.  The Walking Dead Colloquium will provide a forum to discuss the “shadowy” legal interpolation of the dead on the living and explore both its positive and negative ramifications in an effort to strike a pluralistic balance between the law of past, present, and future.  Thematic examples include:

  • Legal recognition of the dead’s wishes affecting real property and intellectual property
  • Regulation of pandemics from yellow fever to Ebola
  • Constitutional analysis relying upon views of the dead—the Framers—versus a “living” Constitution
  • The death penalty
  • Desecration laws
  • The Right to Die Movement
  • Posthumous evidentiary privileges
  • Wrongful death and rights of survivorship
  • Regulation of corpses, organ donation, and burials
  • Stigma harms to real property inhabited by ghosts
  • Post-apocalyptic justice.

Abstracts no longer than 500 words are due by August 1, 2015.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

05/01/2015

Making the Most of Terminal Illness (humor)

A doctor told her patient that his test results indicated that he had a rare disease and had only six months to live.

“Isn’t there anything I can do?”, pleaded the patient.

“Marry a lawyer,” the doctor advised.  “It will be the longest six months of your life.”

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

05/01/2015

Granny Takes an Art Class

My Journey with Elizabeth Layton

Although it was nearly 40 years ago, I remember seeing Elizabeth Layton's drawings for the first time as if it were yesterday. I was a young reporter for The Herald newspaper in Ottawa, Kansas, when I saw two of these drawings. They made me laugh and cry at the same time. Drawings of an old woman with big green eyes that reached out to me.

Then, I learned from her art teacher at Ottawa University that Elizabeth Layton was 68 years old and taking her first art course. This, I realized, would be a good story for my newspaper, "Granny Takes Art Class." Meeting her, however, I realized that this was more than a one-time story for the Ottawa Herald. It would be my life.

When the story appeared in The Herald, I had also arranged for a dozen of her drawings to be shown at the local library. Visiting her weekly, I learned more of the story. She had been depressed half her life and undergone shock treatments. Learning to draw helped to cure her depression. It was gone six months after she began drawing by looking at herself in a mirror and drawing not only what she saw but what she felt.

I was able to arrange for one-person exhibitions of her work in about 160 museums across the country, including the Smithsonian. And I was able to get coverage of her in Life, People and Parade magazines, as well as NPR and Good Morning America.

She and I had an understanding and a mission. We knew that viewing her drawings could and has helped people – people dealing with their own aging, their own depression, their own families. And the drawings could help people better understand the social issues around them – racial injustice, homosexuality, the environment, homeless, and on and on.

Elizabeth had to draw and I had to get those drawings "out there." It was my therapy during the last 16 years of her life and the 22 years since.

By Don Lambert, Curator

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Practical Bioethics. Bookmark the permalink.

05/01/2015

More Healthcare Job Growth

The other day I posted a picture on job growth in the United States, in healthcare versus other parts of the economy. It showed that most growth was healthcare related. Well here is another picture, from the Wall Street Journal, … Continue reading

The post More Healthcare Job Growth appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , . Posted by Peter Ubel. Bookmark the permalink.

05/01/2015

Health Law at AALS 2016 in NYC

Like this January in Washington, DC, the 2016 AALS annual meeting in NYC is shaping up to include quite a bit of programming related to health law.  From the preliminary schedule: Thursday, January 7, 2016 3:30 - 4:45:  Works-In-Progress fo...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

04/30/2015

More on Gene Editing

The recently-public discussion of gene editing has been going on for over a month now.  I have been meaning to try to catch up with some of it.  Tuesday’s post by Courtney Thiele got there first.  This post will attempt to amplify a bit on what Courtney wrote. As Courtney pointed out, the technology involves making selective genetic changes of interest, including, but clearly not... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Genetics, Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Jon Holmlund. Bookmark the permalink.

04/30/2015

AJOB Announces Two New Editors

The American Journal of Bioethics (AJOB) is delighted to announce two new additions to its esteemed Editorial Team.

John Lantos, Associate Editor

John Lantos, MD, is Director of the Children’s Mercy Hospital Bioethics Center in Kansas City.  Prior to moving to Kansas City, he was a Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Chicago, where he was also Chief of General Pediatrics and Associate Director of the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics.

Dr. Lantos has held many leadership positions in bioethics and pediatrics.  He is past president of both the American Society of Bioethics and Humanities as well as the American Society of Law, Medicine, and Ethics. …

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Media and tagged . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.