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05/28/2016

Court Permits Hospital to Evict Patient

Earlier this month, the Lee County Circuit Court permitted Lee Memorial Health System to evict an incapacitated patient who no longer needed acute care services. The patient, Jason Degraaf, had been admitted on April 15, 2015.  By April 21, ...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

05/27/2016

Why America Needs Bioethics Right Now

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

From the title, you probably assumed I’m going to talk about the fast changing pace of medical technology, whether we should be working on human embryos, claims that scientists will be able to do head transplants within 2 years, or even whether the Olympics should be postponed because of Zika. This blog has also paid attention to some of the orphan issues of bioethics: public health, social justice, health disparities, climate change and medicine in war, torture and guns. My interest today, though, is not on the content of bioethics, but rather on its methods of discourse.…

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This entry was posted in Clinical Ethics, Featured Posts, Politics and tagged . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

05/27/2016

Rio Olympics Later:­ For the Good of Both Public Health and Sport

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

It is imperative that an open, transparent discussion of the risks of holding the Olympics as planned in Brazil occur as soon as possible.  Not general assurances from WHO but a frank discussion among independent experts—if Rio is going to happen the world deserves a full discussion of why and at what potential risks and liabilities.

For more information, click through http://rioolympicslater.org/. The text of this letter and link have been added below.


Thanks to Anis-Instituto de Bioética for this art, and please visit their Zika documentary and pages

To sign this letter, please send an email to zikaletter@gmail.comwith your title (dr, prof, etc), department and institutions.

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Politics, Public Health, Sports Ethics. Posted by Arthur Caplan. Bookmark the permalink.

05/27/2016

Support New York State’s Oncofertility Legislation

As I have discussed in previous blogs, fertility preservation for cancer patients is very expensive and it is rarely covered by insurance. Cost is the primary barrier for why cancer patients do not preserve their fertility before undergoing lifesaving, yet potentially sterilizing, treatments. One cycle of IVF is on average $12,400 and estimates for ovarian tissue cryopreservation range from $5,000-$30,000. Furthermore, annual storage fees for frozen gametes and embryos can run up to hundreds of dollars a year. For many, especially while in the midst of a life-threatening health emergency, these costs are prohibitive, and future fertility is left to chance.

Legislation, however, is currently being considered in New York State that could change this situation. SB7219, authored by State Senator Diane Savino, would alter the current infertility mandate in New York to include coverage for standard fertility preservation services needed by those facing possible iatrogenic (medically-induced) infertility due to treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery.

If you are a resident of New York and care about this issue, please contact your state representative to let them know how important this is for you! By bringing together voices of patients, professionals, and families we can help make this change.

How You Can Get Involved:

If you are a cancer patient, survivor or family member who has been touched by this issue, please submit your email here:

Coalition to Help Families Struggling with Infertility - Link for Individuals

If you are a healthcare provider serving patients in New York who would be positively impacted by this coverage, please submit your email here:

Coalition to Help Families Struggling with Infertility - Link for Family Building Professionals

If your institution or nonprofit organization is interested in joining the Coalition to Help Families Struggling with Infertility, email advocacy@helpfamilieswithinfertility.net.

Time is of the essence! All communications should be submitted by June 2nd if possible; the last day of the NY legislative session is June 16th.

References:

  1. To read the entire Bill: http://legislation.nysenate.gov/pdf/bills/2015/S7219
  2. To learn more about the Bill or the Coalition: Coalition to Help Families Struggling with Infertility Website

 

- See more at: http://www.allianceforfertilitypreservation.org/blog/support-pending-fertility-preservation-legislation-in-new-york#sthash.EjwhZ7wP.dpuf

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

 

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05/27/2016

Three New Technologies for Self Deliverance

To the extent that I focus on end-of-life issues, I focus (in articles, conferences, medically-managed means of hastening death: policy counsel) on Withholding/Withdrawing Treatment Voluntary Stopping Eating & Drinking (VSED) Medical Aid in Dying ...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

05/27/2016

A Bump on the Road to “3-Parent Babies”

As described in my post of February 25, and at other times on this blog, efforts are proceeding to apply “mitochondrial replacement techniques” (MRTs) to prevent severe, maternally-inherited mitochondrial disease from being passed on to children of affected women.  MRTs involve attempting to put the nucleus of an egg or embryo from an affected woman into a cell or embryo from an unaffected mom, so... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Genetics, Health Care and tagged , , , , , . Posted by Jon Holmlund. Bookmark the permalink.

05/26/2016

Career Paths in Public Health Law and Health Law (webinar)

Join me on Wednesday. June 1 from 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. ET for a free webinar: "Career Paths in Public Health Law and Health Law."

This webinar will provide attendees with a better understanding of the evolving nature of the public health law field and will share targeted strategies and practical advice on how to find jobs in the field. Two experienced professionals will discuss the relationship between health law and public health law, offer examples of opportunities in both the traditional public health law realm and in evolving areas of work and provide tips on a number of career topics. 

Presenters:

  • Thaddeus Pope, J.D., Ph.D., Director, Health Law Institute and Professor of Law, Mitchell Hamline School of Law
  • Dan O'Brien, J.D., Consultant, Network for Public Health Law and Former Counsel, Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene


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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

05/26/2016

Not Your Father’s Medical Humanities

Hearing the Call:  A Feature on How Physicians and Medical Educators Came to Understand their Vocation By Delese Wear & Therese Jones No one would argue that the definitions of “health” and “medicine” are different.  However,  when some of us began to urge a change regarding those words as modifiers—as in medical humanities being replaced […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by reflectivemeded. Bookmark the permalink.

05/26/2016

An Easy (But Politically Complicated) Way To Save Billions Of Dollars On Medical Care

I sometimes worry that my wife Paula won’t be able to see me grow old. Not that I expect to outlive her. She is four years my junior and has the blood pressure of a 17-year-old track star. It’s her … Continue reading

The post An Easy (But Politically Complicated) Way To Save Billions Of Dollars On Medical Care appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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05/26/2016

Obsessed with Smartness

I came across an article published recently in The Chronicle of Higher Education with the rather surprising title: “Are Colleges Too Obsessed With Smartness?”

I have spent the last forty-eight years at one college or another as a student, fellow or faculty member and for nearly all of that time I have always thought of smartness as a good and admirable thing in those who taught me, those I taught, and my colleagues. I thought therefore, that it might be worth taking a look to find out exactly what he meant by “smartness” and what he thought was wrong with higher educators being interested in smartness. I will admit that I began reading with the idea that the contention might possibly be misguided. I also went into that consideration aware of the frequency with which overreaching statements made in The Chronicle of Higher Education by retired professors really mean that they are promoting a book. In this case the latter was true but I will not name the book as I do not wish to promote it.

Eric Hoover, Professor Emeritus at UCLA actually appears to define smartness pretty much the same way everybody else does “in the traditional sense, kids who get the highest grades and testy scores.” He objects that the “emphasis on these students” is “to the detriment of everybody else”. He does not really provide much of an argument, in this article, how this is to the detriment of everybody else. It may very well be true that these students have an advantage in gaining admission to some institutions and being awarded certain scholarships. Is this necessarily bad? I am not sure I believe this is a problem. There are many scholarships awarded on the basis of need. Is it wrong that some are awarded on merit?

When I served as a consultant to my local public school system I learned that the curriculum was aimed at the average students and that there were many programs in place to assist lower achieving students. The smartest students were often left underserved, bored and uninterested and as a result underachieving. I was happy to advocate and help design programs for these students.

There are many opportunities in place where a student’s innate qualities may be to their advantage. When I made my rather marginal attempts to succeed on my high school football team I accepted the fact that the largest, strongest, fastest players had an advantage. In defense of my teammates I will note that many of them were quite smart as well. I do not think there is anything wrong with obtaining advantage based on being smart, especially in an educational system in a society and economy which rewards merit and accomplishment. I could not have achieved much if I had to be strong and fast to succeed. I am glad there was an opportunity for me to achieve and succeed based on the things I was able to do. I am glad that others will also be able to succeed based on what they can do.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Bioethics Today. Bookmark the permalink.