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05/04/2016

Inefficient pain management for black patients shows that there is a fine line between ‘inhumane’ and ‘superhuman’

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

It’s well known that in America there are great disparities in health, access to health care, and health care outcomes between black people and white people, with black people, on average, faring much worse than white people. For example, if you are black in America you are more likely to die from breast cancer, heart disease, strokes, and giving birth than if you are white in America. According to the National Institute of Medicine, health disparities between races exist even when factors such as stage of disease presentation and the severity of disease are the same.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Health Disparities and tagged . Posted by Bonsai Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

05/04/2016

What Is "Chronic Critical Illness"?

Check out the latest New York Times Well blog post by Daniela Lamas: "When the Patient Won’t Ever Get Better"

"In the early moments of critical illness, the choices seem relatively simple, the stakes high – you live or you die. But the chronically critically ill inhabit a kind of in-between purgatory state, all uncertainty and lingering . . . they move . . . from hospital to long-term care and back again, accompanied by a growing stack of medical records as things slowly fall apart."

"There are about 100,000 chronically critically ill patients in the United States at any one time, and with an aging population and improving medical technologies, this number is only expected to grow. The outcomes of these patients are staggeringly poor. Half of the chronically critically ill will die within a year, and only around 10 percent will ever return to independent life at home."

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

05/03/2016

BioethicsTV: Containment Fails to Go Viral

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The CW network began airing a “limited” series (what used to be called a mini-series) drama about a bio-terrorism outbreak in the city of Atlanta. Similar to the far superior film Contagion, this television show explores how lives change and the tough decisions that are made in an epidemic.

Containment demonstrates many of the real tools public health has for controlling an epidemic of little known origin and lacking cure or vaccine: closing public places, compulsory leave at businesses, cordon sanitaire, curfews, sanitation, isolation, price controls, quarantine, screening, surveillance, testing, and travel restrictions.

Like all good ethics, I’ll begin with some definitions: Although there are several definitions for these terms, for our purposes here, quarantine is separating exposed persons who are symptom free.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Media, Public Health and tagged , , . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

05/03/2016

Roundtable Discussion: Bioethics Advisory Bodies Past, Present, and Future

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) closed its reflections on the impact of national bioethics advisory bodies with a roundtable discussion involving Commission members and the day’s presenters. Amy Gutmann, Ph.D., Chair of the Bioethics Commission, began the session by asking each panelist to articulate an important takeaway from the […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , . Posted by Karen Meagher. Bookmark the permalink.

05/03/2016

Additional Reflections on National Bioethics Advisory Bodies

The Bioethics Commission continued its discussion on the impact of bioethics advisory bodies, looking to the past to inform future efforts to address social and ethical dimensions of health, science, and technology policy. In the second panel of the day, the Bioethics Commission heard from a variety of speakers considering the past, present, and future […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , . Posted by Karen Meagher. Bookmark the permalink.

05/03/2016

Reflections on National Bioethics Advisory Bodies

At today’s meeting, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) reflected on its own tenure and that of other bioethics advisory bodies. In the first panel session of the day, the Bioethics Commission heard from a series of speakers reflecting on the past, present, and future impact of national bioethics advisory […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Karen Meagher. Bookmark the permalink.

05/03/2016

U.S. Military Medical Ethics Guidelines in Limbo

Adil E. Shamoo

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Susan Gilbert. Bookmark the permalink.

05/03/2016

Bioethics Commission Meeting 25: Live from Washington, DC

Welcome to Washington, DC for the 25th public meeting of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission). The Bioethics Commission’s meeting is today, May 3, 2016, from 9 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. ET. Chair Dr. Amy Gutmann opened up the meeting by summarizing the Bioethics Commission’s forthcoming report focusing on key […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , . Posted by Karen Meagher. Bookmark the permalink.

05/03/2016

Life after Death?

The post Life after Death? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Peter Ubel. Bookmark the permalink.

05/03/2016

Brain Death Case – Kaiser Continues to "Treat" Israel Stinson

The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California has extended the
TRO mandating Kaiser to "treat" Israel Stinson until May 11.  That is the day scheduled for a hearing on the preliminary injunction.

Dr. Chris Palkowski, chief of staff at Kaiser Permanente Roseville Medical Center, issued the following statement on Monday’s court hearing.  (HT Fox40)

"Our hearts go out to this family as they cope with the irreversible brain death of their son, and we continue to offer our support and compassion to them. We will continue to comply with orders issued by the Federal court."

"Last week, the California Superior Court ruled that Kaiser Permanente Roseville complied with all state requirements (under California Health and Safety Code 7180 and 7181) that specify what steps physicians and hospitals must take to determine brain death. Israel's parents asked the California Superior Court to rule that Kaiser Permanente's procedures for determining brain death did not comply with the law. The Court ruled that Kaiser Permanente fully complied with the state law. The Court also ruled that Kaiser Permanente fully satisfied the law's requirement that a hospital provide a reasonable amount of time after determining brain death, to allow the family to come together."

"California's law is modeled on one that has been adopted in nearly all the states in the nation. It's called the Uniform Determination of Death Act and applies to all, regardless of religion. At Monday’s hearing, the family asked the Federal Court to challenge this California law, and rule that federal law provides an exception in the case of a religious belief that brain death does not exist."

Here is my own summary of California brain death law at a Los Angeles conference last year.



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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.