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10/29/2014

How Medicare Is Punishing Hospitals That Care For Poor People

Such a no-brainer: If patients who receive care at Hospital A are more likely to get readmitted to the hospital 10, 20 or 30 days after discharge than patients in Hospital B, then Hospital A must be doing something wrong. … Continue reading

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10/29/2014

Ebola and Human Nature

With over half of the posts on this blog in the past 2 weeks being about Ebola I was hesitant to write more about it, but I will anyway. In the midst of daily e-mails from the hospital system I work for about mandatory Ebola screening training and containment procedures and questions from the students where I teach it is hard to avoid thinking about… // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Steve Phillips. Bookmark the permalink.

10/29/2014

Jahi McMath – Prematurely Fostering Mistrust

Jahi McMath was adjudicated as legally dead in December 2013.  Her family has yet to deliver any cogent, definitive evidence that supports changing her diagnosis. Can they?  Will they?

If Jahi’s family can establish (with independent expert …

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

10/28/2014

If no travel restrictions, then….quarantine?

As the Ebola epidemic rages on, the debate about travel limitations has moved inevitably to the next stage: whether there ought to be a quarantine imposed on healthcare providers and others returning from service in endemic areas. We have been reading two opposing views, one emphasizing, as did Governor Christie of New Jersey, that “the obligation of elected officials is to protect the public health… // Read More »

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10/28/2014

Dr. Fauci or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Hate the Media’s Coverage of Ebola

by Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD

Although the Ebola virus is not ubiquitous, media coverage of it certainly is. A quick Google search of Ebola results in 37,700,000 hits. By comparison, Googling Obama results in 34,200,000 hits (although googling Obama and Ebola together results in 91,800,000 hits). Media coverage of Ebola has displaced many other news stories over the last few weeks. WNYC’s On the Media has tried to temper the over-the-top media coverage. They even posted a Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook. Yet, the media juggernaut continues. Why does the US media obsess over public health matters that pose modest risk here, yet ignore much greater risks?…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Media, Public Health and tagged . Posted by Kayhan Parsi. Bookmark the permalink.

10/28/2014

Responding to Ebola: The Question of Quarantine

Karyn L. Boyar

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Susan Gilbert. Bookmark the permalink.

10/28/2014

More Secret DNR Orders in UK – Barbara Gibson

In the UK, clinicians may write a DNR order without consent, if they deem that to be in the patient’s best interest.  But clinicians must still consult with the patient or family.  In other words, they may write a unilateral DNR order.  But they may not write a “secret” DNR order.
 
Yet, as I have recounted on this blog more than a dozen times, this continues to happen.   One of the most recent cases occurred in August 2014 at Ayr Hospital.


In an apology letter to the family, the said: “I wish to offer my sincere apologies again on behalf of all the staff concerned for the distressing events you have described, and wish to reassure you that lessons have been learned and that practice around DNACPR decisions are being reviewed and improved as a matter of urgency across the organization. . . .  It is evident from the review of Mrs Gibson’s medical records, and discussions with staff involved, there were failures in communicating the medical decisions around resuscitation to Mrs Gibson and yourselves.”





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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

10/27/2014

Ebola: where is the rock concert benefit?

by Arthur Caplan, PhD and Nir Eyal, D.Phil

Ebola’s toll is rising exponentially. Millions of lives are at risk in West Africa, and panic is starting to take its toll in the rest of the world.

Normally in a crisis like this our best charitable impulses pour forth. Especially among musicians, Hollywood and artists. So why aren’t fund-raising drives taking place? Where are the rock concerts, fashion shows, triathlons we saw for famines and for AIDS? Why the extreme paucity of small private donations?

Some may think donations won’t help. Of course they would.

Donations could buy protective equipment and disinfectant for health personnel and for home care givers.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Public Health and tagged . Posted by Arthur Caplan. Bookmark the permalink.

10/27/2014

Bioethics Commission FAQs from ASBH

Last week the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) attended the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) annual meeting, held in San Diego, California October 16-19. Along with leading multiple presentations, the Bioethics Commission was pleased to host a booth in the conference’s exhibition hall. The exhibit featured Commission reports […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Alannah Kittle. Bookmark the permalink.

10/27/2014

Must we all die with forced hand-feeding in Advanced Dementia? Will others honor our Living Will?

A nice video by Stanley Terman reviewing the Margot Bentley case now on appeal in British Columbia.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.