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by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

 “Mental illness and hatred pulls the trigger, not the gun” – President Trump, 4 August 2019

In 2019 (as of September 13), there have been 297 “mass shootings” (4 or more people killed or injured) in the United States resulting in 326 deaths and 1,229 injuries. The reason, according to Trump’s administration is untreated mental illness. According to many mental health specialists, lots of people with mental illness never injure another person and many of the shooters have not been diagnosed with a mental illness. People have mental illnesses in other countries and yet those places do not have a mass shooting problem.…

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Here are four reasons why this two-day conference in Seattle was a real standout from most other end-of-life conferences that I attend.  1.  It was full of top experts from Randy Curtis to Tim Quill.  2. Medicine, law, and ethics were ...

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Ann all-star cast has remade the 2014 Danish film "Silent Heart.” The new film is "Blackbird."

Susan Sarandon’s Lily has ALS, which has already cost her the use of one hand and made walking a chore. Doctor husband Paul can hardly deny the inevitability with which her condition will degenerate until she’s incapable of moving, or even swallowing, on her own. (HT: Variety)

That is not a juncture that Lily means to reach. Lily has set a date for her death — this Sunday — and will take a lethal dosage to die in her sleep after a final 48 hours spent with the family.  


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There is no doubt that those writing to this blog thread are "Speaking Up" here but to attempt to meet the goal of the preservation of patient dignity within the medical system, it is necessary for your voices to be heard by your physician and office o...

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There is no doubt that those writing to this blog thread are "Speaking Up" here but to attempt to meet the goal of the preservation of patient dignity within the medical system, it is necessary for your voices to be heard by your physician and office o...

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by Nanette Elster, JD, MPH

A recent article in Stat News decrying the end of donor anonymity in sperm donation due to consumergenetic testing sparked my attention. In the spirit of full disclosure, I am the parent of an adolescent through anonymous sperm donation and have written and spoken extensively on this topic for over 20 years. So, in reading the Stat News article as my curious, internet savvy teen has begun her own journey of discovery about her genetics, I could not help but think, “FINALLY.” This is something I have expected with the advent of genetics and .…

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The American Academy of Neurology's fall conference includes an interesting session on October 19, 2019: "Contemporary Concerns About Brain Death Determination."

"Despite the fact that brain death has achieved widespread medical and legal acceptance for nearly 50 years, medical, social, and legal controversies associated with determination of death by neurologic criteria persist."

"This course will review guidelines for declaration of brain death and examine contemporary challenges to brain death determination. We will also address the AAN Brain Death Working Group’s actions and recommendations to approach, avoid, and abrogate these controversies."

"Upon Completion: Participants should be knowledgeable about the AAN’s guidelines for declaration of brain death; contemporary clinical, ethical, and legal challenges to brain death determination; and the AAN Brain Death Working Group’s actions and recommendations to approach, avoid, and abrogate these controversies."

Medical and Legal Criteria for Brain Death Around the World
8:00 a.m.–8:35 a.m. - Ariane Lewis, MD – New York, NY

Brain Death and Society: Familial Objections to Use of Neurologic Criteria to Declare Death
8:35 a.m.–9:00 a.m. - Matthew Kirschen, MD, PhD – Philadelphia, PA

The Brain Death Working Group 
9:00 a.m.–9:20 a.m. - James A. Russell, DO, FAAN – Manchester, MA

Questions and Answers
9:20 a.m.–9:30 a.m. 


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The American Academy of Neurology's fall conference includes an interesting session on October 19, 2019: "Contemporary Concerns About Brain Death Determination."

"Despite the fact that brain death has achieved widespread medical and legal acceptance for nearly 50 years, medical, social, and legal controversies associated with determination of death by neurologic criteria persist."

"This course will review guidelines for declaration of brain death and examine contemporary challenges to brain death determination. We will also address the AAN Brain Death Working Group’s actions and recommendations to approach, avoid, and abrogate these controversies."

"Upon Completion: Participants should be knowledgeable about the AAN’s guidelines for declaration of brain death; contemporary clinical, ethical, and legal challenges to brain death determination; and the AAN Brain Death Working Group’s actions and recommendations to approach, avoid, and abrogate these controversies."

Medical and Legal Criteria for Brain Death Around the World
8:00 a.m.–8:35 a.m. - Ariane Lewis, MD – New York, NY

Brain Death and Society: Familial Objections to Use of Neurologic Criteria to Declare Death
8:35 a.m.–9:00 a.m. - Matthew Kirschen, MD, PhD – Philadelphia, PA

The Brain Death Working Group 
9:00 a.m.–9:20 a.m. - James A. Russell, DO, FAAN – Manchester, MA

Questions and Answers
9:20 a.m.–9:30 a.m. 


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by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

The story of Flint, Michigan’s water crisis, beginning in 2014 is a story that most people are familiar with. After changing how their water is supplied—Going from Detroit supplied water to water supplied from Flint river to the ultimate goal of pipelines bringing in water from Lake Huron—the water became contaminated. The yellow-ish brown, foul odor water brought in from Flint River had high levels of lead causing many people to not drink the water or use it for cooking, brushing teeth, or any other life activity that required water. Celebrities, professional athletes, and every day people all donated bottled water to Flint’s residents to help them with this crisis.…

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In 2010, the state of Rhode Island decided to tackle high healthcare costs. It did so by requiring insurers to meet affordability standards. The plan worked, but not for the reasons you probably suspect. Let’s start with what Rhode Island’s standards … Continue reading

The post High Healthcare Costs — Are Insurance Premiums a Cause or an Effect? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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