Blog RSS Blog.

09/23/2018

Let’s Talk about Death (over Dinner) – An Invitation and Guide to Life’s Most Important Conversation

For readers of Being Mortal and When Breath Becomes Air, the acclaimed founder of Death over Dinner offers a practical, inspiring guide to life’s most difficult yet important conversation.

Of the many critical conversations we will all have throughout our lifetime, few are as important as the ones discussing death–and not just the practical considerations, such as DNRs and wills, but what we fear, what we hope, and how we want to be remembered. Yet few of these conversations are actually happening. 

Inspired by his experience with his own father and countless stories from others who regret not having these conversations, Michael Hebb cofounded Death Over Dinner–an organization that encourages people to pull up a chair, break bread, and really talk about the one thing we all have in common. Death Over Dinner has been one of the most effective end-of-life awareness campaigns to date; in just three years, it has provided the framework and inspiration for more than a hundred thousand dinners focused on having these end-of-life conversations.

Let’s Talk About Death (over Dinner) offers keen practical advice on how to have these same conversations–not just at the dinner table, but anywhere. There’s no one right way to talk about death, but Hebb shares time- and dinner- tested prompts to use as conversation starters, ranging from the spiritual to the practical, from analytical to downright funny and surprising. By transforming the most difficult conversations into an opportunity, they become celebratory and meaningful–ways that not only can change the way we die, but the way we live.


Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

09/22/2018

Festival of Death and Dying

This weekend is the Sydney edition of the Festival of Death and Dying.  There will be over 20 participatory workshops, performances, talks and ceremonies on different aspects of death and dying over two days. In addition to talks and discussions,...

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

09/21/2018

We Convey More Than We (Literally) Say

by Jason N. Batten, Bonnie O. Wong, William F. Hanks & David Magnus

This issue of the American Journal of Bioethics features a target article by Blumenthal-Barby and Ubel that focuses on patients who are unrealistically optimistic, in denial, or self-deceived. In his excellent commentary, Weinfurt points us toward a particular branch of communication theory—pragmatics—as a fruitful way of evaluating statements made by these patients. He and several other bioethicists have contributed to a small but growing literature applying pragmatics to physician–patient communication, research ethics, and our interpretation of empirical bioethics studies. We believe that pragmatics has the potential to transform how we hear and understand day-to-day communication with patients and their families.…

Full Article

This entry was posted in Clinical Ethics, Decision making, Editorial-AJOB, Featured Posts and tagged . Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.

09/21/2018

Ethics and Society Newsfeed – September 21, 2018

Politics Trump Rated Worse Than Other Modern-Day Presidents on Ethics “The American public’s ratings of the ethical standards of Trump and his administration’s top officials are generally much worse than their ratings of his predecessors. Trump is viewed as having lower ethical standards than all presidents since Nixon, who resigned when faced with imminent impeachment.” […]

Full Article

09/21/2018

"Island" – New Film Shows Process of Dying

Four individuals experience the year in which their lives will end. Illness progresses, relationships gently shift, and we are witness to rarely seen and intensely private moments. One person shares their acceptance of death, whilst another is surround...

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

09/21/2018

When Morality Isn’t So Moral: Price Gouging in Big Pharma

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“I think it is a moral requirement to make money when you can…to sell the product for the highest price” Nirmal Mulyeto the Financial Times

I have been haunted by the above quote, first reported in the Financial Times on September 11. Mulye, CEO of Nostrom Laboratories, raised the price of an old (1953), formerly inexpensive, antibiotic by 404 percent to nearly $2,400 per bottle (from about $475). Mulye explains his rationale at first by saying that the drug’s only competitor raised their price to $2,800, so his move is really a bargain. He also claims that he has a duty to his stockholders to give them a return for their investment, thus the need to raise the fees.…

Full Article

This entry was posted in Ethics, Featured Posts, Philosophy & Ethics and tagged . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

09/20/2018

Let the Sun Shine into the Medical Ivory Tower

In 2012, I coauthored a case report about the successful use of dietary supplements in treating a case of male infertility in the American Family Physician. Before it was published, I was surprised to receive a communication asking me to disclose the fact that I had written a textbook on dietary supplements. It had not… Read more

The post Let the Sun Shine into the Medical Ivory Tower appeared first on The Hastings Center.

Full Article

09/20/2018

Avoiding advanced dementia, part 2

By Steve Phillips Last week I wrote about one of my moral concerns regarding Norman Cantor’s proposal to avoid advanced dementia, which he views as being intolerably degrading, by using an advance directive stating that when he reached a certain level of dementia he no longer wanted to eat or drink so that his death …

Continue reading "Avoiding advanced dementia, part 2"

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Steve Phillips. Bookmark the permalink.

09/20/2018

Medical Association of Georgia Considers Medical Futility Policy

Next month, the Medical Association of Georgia meets to consider resolutions at its House of Delegates meeting.   Resolution 110A.18 concerns the 2015 ATS Official Policy Statement: Responding to Requests for Potentially Inappropriate Treatm...

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

09/19/2018

Silence versus Bearing Witness: Response to Alan Stone

by Bandy X. Lee, MD, MDiv

Earlier this year, I was delighted to discover that Dr. Alan Stone had written a review of the book I edited: The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President, for the blog Lawfare. Most outside of psychiatry will not have heard of Dr. Stone, but he is a well-respected figure among psychiatrists who practice at the intersections of law and ethics, such as myself.  I was delighted not because I was anticipating a positive review, but because I hoped that a rigorous discussion without misrepresentation would break open the myopia of my field.…

Full Article

This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Politics, professional ethics, Psychiatric Ethics. Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.