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09/22/2014

Tobacco is Taking Over the World!

We’ve done a lot of things in the United States over the last few decades to curb tobacco consumption. We’ve warned people cigarettes will kill them, created persuasive ad campaigns to scare people away from cigarettes, and added a hefty … Continue reading

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09/22/2014

Epistemological Uncertainty & Autonomy

In the September 17, 2014 issue of JAMA Scott Stonington, MD, PhD wrote a remarkable piece entitled “Whose Autonomy?” This short piece should be required reading for everyone in medicine. Stonington discusses the idea of family roles and puts this in light of his anthropological work in northern Thailand. He uses his fieldwork experience to introduce the idea that, when ill, people may not express… // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Christian Vercler. Bookmark the permalink.

09/21/2014

Health Care Reform Implementation in Minnesota: Mission Advanced But Not Accomplished

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

09/21/2014

Careers & Pro Bono Opportunities in Bioethics & Law

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

09/20/2014

Population Health: the New Medicine

Below is a modified copy of my response to an informational article that was recently sent by the CEO of our hospital to our medical staff. Many suggested that I make this letter available publicly. Little do they know that I do so on a regular basis! “I want to thank our CEO for forwarding this article to us while simultaneously pointing out its significance… // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Susan Haack. Bookmark the permalink.

09/20/2014

Both Sides Now: Living with Dying: An Immersive Arts Experience

Puppetry, theater, visual arts, and more.  A very cool arts experience is happening this weekend in Singapore called Both Sides Now.  The “immersive arts experience” provides the opportunity for the living to encounter dying. 

Organizer…

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

09/20/2014

Both Sides Now: Living with Dying: An Immersive Arts Experience

Puppetry, theater, visual arts, and more.  A very cool arts experience is happening this weekend in Singapore called Both Sides Now.  The “immersive arts experience” provides the opportunity for the living to encounter dying. 

Organizer…

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

09/19/2014

Antidepressants: Society duped?

Has our society has been duped about antidepressant medication? It’s estimated that around 10% of the American population is taking an antidepressant. However, a growing body of research seems to indicate that antidepressant medication isn’t much better in the treatment of depression than placebo (sugar pills). The treatment effects of antidepressants may be statistically significant when compared to placebo, but not clinically significant. In other words, if you… // Read More »

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09/19/2014

Heart-Wrenching Words from Beethoven on Deafness

It is an awful irony that Ludwig van Beethoven, who I consider the greatest composer in the history of the world, experienced deafness from an early age, a disability that did not seem to interfere with his musical productivity one … Continue reading

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , , . Posted by Peter Ubel. Bookmark the permalink.

09/19/2014

Ethical Issues in End-of-Life Care: MacLean Center Interdisciplinary Faculty Seminar Series

Check out this amazing roster of nearly 30 world class seminars on end-of-life issues in the MacLean Center’s 2014-2015 Interdisciplinary Faculty Seminar Series.


In the past 50 years, medicine has developed new and unprecedented technologies like breathing machines and dialysis that can prevent or delay death. These technologies have changed how people die, where people die, and physicians’ responsibilities to dying patients. During these 50 years, physicians and society have gradually learned how to best apply these life-saving technologies and how to stop them. In the vast majority of cases in which death is anticipated, patients, families and physicians reach prudent and “negotiated” decisions on when to stop aggressive care.


Yet questions remain. Advance directives have not been the panacea they were hoped to be and deciding for patients who are unable to speak for themselves remains painfully difficult for families and practitioners. Newer technologies such as implanted cardiac defibrillators, left ventricular assist devices, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation continue to raise new questions. Euthanasia and physician assisted suicide remain contentious subjects. Even questions that were thought settled, such as brain death and palliative sedation, have generated new controversies. Further, the cost of caring for patients at the end of life continues to consume a large percentage of the health budget, raising questions about the optimal and just use of health care resources.


THE ETHICS OF GLOBAL PALLIATIVE CARE
KATHEY FOLEY
Wednesday, October 8


THE DEFINITION OF DEATH: NEWLY EMERGING CONTROVERSIES
ROBERT VEATCH
Wednesday, October 15


STARTING VERY SMALL: NEWBORN PERSPECTIVES ON THE BIG DECISIONS
PERRIS KLASS
Wednesday, October 22


BEING MORTAL: MEDICINE AND WHAT MATTERS IN THE END
ATUL GAWANDE
Thursday, October 23


VOLUNTARILY STOPPING EATING AND DRINKING: SEPARATING THE WHEAT FROM THE CHAFF
DANIEL SULMASY
Wednesday, October 29


THE LACK OF CONSENSUS ABOUT FUTILITY
ALAN MEISEL
Wednesday, November 5


TRANFORMING HOW WE CARE FOR THOSE NEAR THE END OF LIFE
SUSAN TOLLE
Wednesday, November 12


COMMUNICATING ABOUT PROGNOSIS AND END-OF-LIFE CARE IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER
JENNIFER TEMEL
Wednesday, November 19


THE FIVE HORSEMEN: MANAGING ‘WICKED’ GLOBAL CRISES
DANIEL CALLAHAN
Wednesday, December 3


SEDATION, CONSCIOUSNESS AND PERSONHOOD: CLINICAL AND ETHICAL PERSPECTIVES IN A PALLIATIVE SETTING
TIMOTHY QUILL
Wednesday, December 10


DONATION AFTER CARDIAC DEATH (DCD): ACADEMIC DISSENT FAILS PATIENTS
TRACY KOOGLER
Wednesday, January 7


THE COST OF END-OF-LIFE CARE
TOMAS PHILIPSON
Wednesday, January 14


MEDICAL STUDENT REFLECTIONS ON CARING FOR DYING PATIENTS
MARK KUCZEWSKI
Wednesday, January 21


WHEN GOOD INTENTIONS AREN’T ENOUGH: BARRIERS TO OPTIMAL END-OF-LIFE CARE
RANJANA SRIVASTAVA
Wednesday, January 28


END-OF-LIFE DECISIONS IN PEDIATRICS: WHY THEY ARE DIFFERENT
JOEL FRADER
Wednesday, February 4


PREDICTING END OF LIFE
BILL MEADOW
Wednesday, February 11


DEMOCRATIC LEGITIMACY AND END-OF-LIFE DECISIONS
DAN BRUDNEY
Wednesday, February 18


THE PROMISE OF A TREATMENT: CARDIAC ARREST AND ITS EFFECT ON CONTEMPORARY MEDICINE
DAN BRAUNER
Wednesday, February 25


ETHICAL OBLIGATIONS AND CLINICAL CARE IN END-OF-LIFE CARE: DERIVING A QUALITY-OF-LIFE CONSTRUCT BASED ON THE ISLAMIC CONCEPT OF ACCOUNTABILITY BEFORE GOD
AASIM PADELA
Wednesday, March 4


TORT LIABILITY IN END-OF-LIFE CARE
NADIA SAWICKI
Wednesday, March 11


ETHICAL ISSUES IN DISCONTINUING LVADS
SAVITRI FEDSON
Wednesday, April 1


IMPROVING QUALITY REDUCES COSTS: ETHICAL ASPECTS OF CARE FOR THE SERIOUSLY ILL
DIANE MEIER
Wednesday, April 8


PERSONS WITH DEMENTIA: ARE THEY THE CANARY IN THE COAL MINE?
JOAN TENO
Wednesday, April 15


WHAT’S SO HARD ABOUT END-OF-LIFE DECISION-MAKING?
PETER UBEL
Wednesday, April 22


A GENERATION LATER: WHY HAS THE END-OF-LIFE DEBATE ENDED?
RICHARD EPSTEIN
Wednesday, April 29


ECMO AS A ‘BRIDGE TO NOWHERE’: ETHICALLY CHALLENGING POIGNANT CASES FROM THE TECHNOLOGICAL EDGE
KEN PRAGER
Wednesday, May 6


LAST EXIT OFF THE CARDIAC FREEWAY: ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN PALLIATIVE CARE AND CARDIOVASCULAR IMPLANTABLE ELECTRONIC DEVICES
JAMES KIRKPATRICK
Wednesday, May 13


ONE EXPLORER’S MAP INTO THE WORLD OF PALLIATIVE CARE CHAPLAINCY RESEARCH
LINDA EMANUEL
Wednesday, May 20

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.