Blog RSS Blog.

04/27/2017

When is Non-Existence Better than being Alive?

If bioethics has central or recurring questions, this is surely one of them.  And, of course, the problem, or question, often is restated to: who decides if this life is worth living?  The confounding elephant in the room is that families often have more hope than care providers, and the evidence is mixed on whether either party is particularly accurate in projecting the future.

Hannah Arendt in her book The Human Condition described in detail how humans must make choices without knowing outcomes.  Everyone (except neurologists) loves the stories about people coming out of comas and persistive vegetative states.  Neurologists are not fans because it admits to an inability to predict—even being right 98% of the time isn’t enough. 

Obstetricians face this problem constantly, but with different stakes.  We know fetal heart rate monitoring is far from perfect, but none of us would ignore a bradycardia of several minutes.  Maybe this baby is actually dying, and we aren’t going to take the chance.  When is non-existence acceptable in my specialty?  Only when the pregnant woman has decided it is so.

At both ends of life, non-existence, the ultimate existential question, is left to patient and family values, because there is no cultural/societal consensus.  Inuit tribes expected the elderly and infirm to walk out into the ice when times got tough, and food was scarce.  Our culture rejects this, but medical students often question why we keep alive an individual with no hope of recovery and little or no awareness of their surroundings or condition.

I am not a utilitarian, and I am not defending any of Peter Singer’s views.  But I still wish that we did not prolong suffering, or pour resources into a life without awareness of its own self.  Families struggle with these decisions, and often choose the conservative choice thinking that hope is better than non-existence.  Those of us in medicine tasked with keeping these fragile physiological flames burning often ask ourselves whether we are doing harm or good.  Until we reach (if ever) a societal consensus, we should share with decision makers our moral ambiguity and sense of regret when we support their loved ones against our better judgment.  Is this enough?  Perhaps not, but we are not yet even doing this with consistency.  

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

 

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Bioethics Today. Bookmark the permalink.

04/27/2017

Charge to U.S. Ethics Committees and IRBs

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

04/27/2017

40th Annual Health Law Professors Conference

If you teach health law, come to the 40th Annual Health Law Professors Conference, June 8-10, 2017, at Georgia State University College of Law in Atlanta.  Here is the schedule:

Thursday, June 8, 2017
8:00-12:00 AM Tour of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Separate registration is required. Participants meet in the lobby of Georgia State Law to take a shuttle to the CDC.)

9:45 – 11:15 AM Tour of Grady Health System (Separate registration is required. Participants meet in the lobby of Georgia State Law and will walk over to Grady as a group.)

2:00 – 5:00 PM Conference Registration – Henson Atrium, Georgia State Law

3:00 – 5:00 PM Jay Healey Teaching Session – Knowles Conference Center, Georgia State Law
Experiential Teaching and Learning in Health Law
The format for this session is World Café roundtables, with plenty of opportunity for the collegial exchange of teaching ideas and insights among your colleagues. Come prepared for a lively, interactive workshop.
World Café Hosts:
Dayna Matthew, University of Colorado Law School
Charity Scott, Georgia State University College of Law
Sidney Watson, Saint Louis University School of Law
Invited Discussants and Participants:
Rodney Adams, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Health Administration
Christina Juris Bennett, University of Oklahoma College of Law
Amy Campbell, University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law
Michael Campbell, Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law
Erin Fuse Brown, Georgia State University College of Law
Cynthia Ho, Loyola University of Chicago School of Law
Danielle Pelfrey Duryea, University of Buffalo School of Law, State University of New York
Jennifer Mantel, University of Houston Law Center
Elizabeth McCuskey, University of Toledo College of Law
Laura McNally-Levine, Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Jennifer Oliva, West Virginia University College of Law and School of Public Health
Thaddeus Pope, Mitchell Hamline School of Law
Lauren Roth, St. John's University School of Law
Katherine Schostok, DePaul University College of Law
Allison Winnike, University of Houston Law Center

5:00 – 7:00 PM Welcome Reception – Henson Atrium, Georgia State Law

Friday, June 9, 2017
7:30 – 8:15 AM Registration & Breakfast – Henson Atrium, Georgia State Law

8:15 – 8:30 AM Opening Remarks – Ceremonial Courtroom, Georgia State Law
Wendy Hensel, Interim Dean and Professor of Law, Georgia State University College of Law
College of Law
Leslie Wolf, Professor of Law, Center for Law, Health & Society, Georgia State University College of Law
Ted Hutchinson, Executive Director, American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics

8:30 – 10:15 AM Plenary Session – Ceremonial Courtroom, Georgia State Law
The Future of Medicaid, Part 1: Struggling for the Soul of Medicaid
Brietta Clark, Loyola Law School, Los Angeles
Nicole Huberfeld, University of Kentucky College of Law
Emily Parento, University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law
Jane Perkins, National Health Law Program
Sidney Watson, Saint Louis University School of Law

10:15 – 10:30 AM Break

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM Concurrent Sessions 1
Health Care Financing and Regulation Session 1A – Room 241
The First Amendment Meets Health Law: New Issues Relating to the Regulation of Health-Related Speech
Moderator: Timothy Lytton, Georgia State University College of Law
Gregory Curfman, Harvard Law School, “Docs v. Glocks”: Patient-Physician Relationships, Guns and Free Speech
Wendy Parmet, Northeastern University School of Law and School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs , Applying the First Amendment to Physician Speech: A Public Health Approach
Christopher Robertson, University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, Promotion of Drugs and Devices: Off-Label and No-Label
Jason Smith, California State University, East Bay, Health, the First Amendment and the Ethics of the Patient-Physician Interaction

Health Care Financing and Regulation Session 1B – Room 245
Developments in Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity: Enforcement, Guidance and Implementation
Moderator: Paul Lombardo, Georgia State University College of Law
Melissa Alexander, University of Wyoming College of Law, Autonomy and Accountability: Why Informed Consent, Consumer Protection, and Defunding Beat Conversion Therapy Bans
Lucy Hodder, University of New Hampshire School of Law, Implementation Challenges and Opportunities
Tara Ragone, Seton Hall University School of Law, Multidisciplinary Enforcement Strategies for States
John Rozel, University of Pittsburgh School of Law, Freeze or I’ll Breach HIPAA: Law Enforcement/Mental Health Collaboration to Prevent Violence

Law, Medicine & Bioethics Session 1C – Room 341
Developments in Human Subjects Research Regulation
Moderator: Leslie Wolf, Georgia State University College of Law
Melissa Goldstein, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, Inside the Development of the Final Rule
Nancy King, Wake Forest School of Medicine, What's New in the New Common Rule?
Michelle Meyer, Geisinger Health System, (Still) Waiting to Exhale: Why the Future of Biospecimens Research Remains Unclear after the Final Rule
Mark Rothstein, University of Louisville School of Medicine, International Health Research
Nicolas Terry, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Health Privacy Fragmentation

Law, Medicine & Bioethics Session 1D – Room 345
Thinking Differently About Surgical Law and Ethics
Moderator: Sylvia Caley, Georgia State University College of Law, “Extraordinary Measures: Special Considerations for the Unbefriended Patient”
Kelly Dineen, Saint Louis University School of Law, Amending the Sunshine Act to Reflect Device Company Gifts to Surgeons
Samantha Johnson, Grady Health System, Extraordinary Measures: Special Considerations for the Unbefriended Patient
Jason Keune, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Is Surgery Ready for the Social Model of Disability?
Wei Li, Montefiore East Tremont Practice, Off¬Label Medical Device use by Surgeons

Public Health Law Session 1E – Room 242
Overarching Themes in Public Health Law
Moderator: Jonathan Todres, Georgia State University College of Law
Lance Gable, Wayne State University Law School, Public and Private Models of Public Health Governance in Trump’s America
Lewis Grossman, American University Washington College of Law, The Taming of Progressive ‘State Medicine’
James Hodge, Arizona State University Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law, Public Health ‘Preemption Plus’ James Holt, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Branch, Public Health Division, HHS Office of the General Counsel, A World without Chevron and Auer
Jennifer Oliva, West Virginia University College of Law and School of Public Health, Public Health Policing

Health Sciences & Technology Session 1F – Room 342
Drug Pricing and Availability
Moderator: Yaniv Heled, Georgia State University College of Law
Robert Bohrer, California Western School of Law, Required Disclosures of Expected Benefit in DTC Ads
Robert Field, Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law, Taming Pharma with Benefit Corporations
Dmitry Karshtedt, The George Washington University Law School, Regulating ‘Evergreening’: The FDA's Role in the Creation of Balanced Rights for Pharmaceutical Improvements
Michael Sinha, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Legal Approaches to Ensuring Timely Generic Drug Availability
Rebecca Wolitz, Stanford Law School, Patents, Preemption, and Price-Gouging

Teaching Session 1G – Room 346
Lessons Learned from Teaching Law Across the Professions
Moderator: Charity Scott, Georgia State University College of Law
Amy Campbell, University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, Teaching an Interdisciplinary Policy Skills Course: Lessons Learned from the Pilot Year
Kimberly Cogdell Granger, North Carolina Central University School of Law, Intersessions, Distance Learning and Public Health Law: Creative Scheduling Increases Student Enrollment
Elizabeth Hall-Lipsy, The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, When, Where, and How Does Interprofessional and Ethical Learning Take Place
Jennifer Herbst, Quinnipiac University School of Law and Frank H. Netter, MD, School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University, How and Why to Bring Business Students Into the Health Law World?
Heather McCabe, Indiana University School of Social Work, Reviewing the Reviews: What are they learning through interprofessional education?

12:00 – 12:30 PM Lunch, Knowles Conference Center, Georgia State Law

12:30 – 1:30 PM Keynote Address: Camara Jones, MD, MPH, PhD, Immediate Past President, American Public Health Association
Achieving Health Equity: Tools for a National Campaign Against Racism

1:30 – 1:45 PM Break

1:45 – 3:15 PM Concurrent Sessions 2
Health Care Financing and Regulation Session 2A – Room 341
Antitrust, False Claims Act, and HSAs
Moderator: Erin Fuse Brown, Georgia State University College of Law
Deborah Farringer, Belmont University College of Law, The Aftermath of Escobar: The Future of ‘Materiality’ under the False Claims Act
Jaime King, University of California, Hastings College of the Law, The Anticompetitive Potential of Cross-Market Mergers
Joan Krause, University of North Carolina School of Law, Certification, Interpretation, and the Quest for Fraud that ‘Counts’ Under the False Claims Act
Elizabeth McCuskey, The University of Toledo College of Law, Affordable Care Preemption
David Orentlicher, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Controlling Health Care Spending: More Patient 'Skin in the Game?'

Law, Medicine & Bioethics Session 2B – Room 241
Malpractice
Moderator: Charity Scott, Georgia State University College of Law
Bartlett Bryce, Duke University Population Research Institute, Coevolution of Medical Malpractice Claims and Mortality Due to Complications from Medical Care
Michael Frakes, Duke University School of Law, Defensive Medicine: Evidence from Military Immunity
Oliver Quick, University of Bristol Law School, Money No One Wants to Have to Receive or Pay: Clinician-Insurer Engagement and Reducing Obstetric Negligence
Elizabeth Sepper, Washington University in St. Louis School of Law, Does Removal of Caps on Malpractice Damages Affect Early Use of Diagnostic Imaging for Acute Low Back Pain?

Public Health Law Session 2C – Room 345
Health Behavior, Nutrition and Food Policy
Moderator: Timothy Lytton, Georgia State University College of Law
Gaia Bernstein, Seton Hall University School of Law, Technological Over-Use as Addiction: Drawing Lessons from the Fights Against Cigarettes and Obesity
Melissa Card, Michigan State University, Institute of Food Laws and Regulations, Nutrition Labeling: Can Labels Reshape the United States?
Daniel Svirsky, Harvard Business School, A Field Study to Test Graphic Warning Labels for Soda
Lexi White, Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, The Academic Cartography of Sugar Sweetened Beverages: Public Health Law Meets Scientific Research
Diana Winters, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, The Failure of Transparency in Food Policy

Public Health Law Session 2D– Room 242
Using the Law to Curb the Opioid Crisis: Challenges and Opportunities
Moderator: Patricia Zettler, Georgia State University College of Law
Basia Andraka-Christou, Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, An International Comparison of Regulations of Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction
Leo Beletsky, School of Law and Bouve College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, America’s Favorite Antidote: The Role of Punishment as an Overdose Prevention Tool
Rebecca Haffajee, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Using the Law to Ramp Up Medication-Assisted Treatment Therapy
Ameet Sarpatwari, Harvard Medical School and T. Chan School of Public Health, The Opioid Epidemic: Fixing a Broken Pharmaceutical Market

Health and Social Justice Session 2E – Room 245
Health Care Discrimination
Moderator: Wendy Hensel, Georgia State University College of Law
Jalayne Arias, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, New Types of Health Information - Same Types of Discrimination
Valarie Blake, West Virginia University College of Law, Addressing Stigma in Health Care Josh Hyatt, University of Southern California- Keck Medicine of USC, Senior LGBT Jonathan Kahn, Mitchell Hamline School of Law, Pills for Prejudice: Implicit Bias and Technical Fix for Racism Kristen Underhill, Columbia Law School, Expressive Impacts of Nondiscrimination Laws in Health Care Settings
Elizabeth Weeks Leonard, University of Georgia School of Law, The Future of Health-Status Discrimination under the Trump Administration

Teaching Session 2F – Room 346
Teaching Techniques
Moderator: Lisa Bliss, Georgia State University College of Law
Rodney Adams, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Health Administration, The Trial of Your Life: Involving Law Students & MHA Students in a Mock Trial
Brian Citro, The University of Chicago Law School, The Value of a Global Health Framework in Experiential Health Law Education
Anna Maitland, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, The Value of a Global Health Framework in Experiential Health Law Education
JoNel Newman, University of Miami School of Law, Beyond ‘Self Care’: Teaching Students and Practitioners about Trauma and its Impact on Clients and their Lawyers
Virginia Rowthorn, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, Creating a Place for Law Students on the Global Health Team
Katherine Schostok, DePaul University College of Law, Alternative Teaching Techniques to Make Students Practice Ready

3:15 – 3:30 PM Break with a guided Yoga Stretch & Mindfulness Sneak Peek , Henson Atrium, Georgia State Law

3:30 – 5:00 PM Concurrent Sessions 3
Regulation of Health Care Business 3A – Room 242
Public and Private Financing
Moderator: Erin Fuse Brown, Georgia State University College of Law
Christina Juris Bennett, University of Oklahoma College of Law, A Case Study of Repealing and Replacing Health Care
Susan Channick, California Western School of Law, Insurance is Insurance
Renee Landers, Suffolk University Law School, The Future of ACA, Medicare, and Medicaid: Analysis of Options by the National Academy of Social Insurance
Brendan Maher, University of Connecticut School of Law, Unlocking Exchanges
Ryan Meade, Loyola University Chicago School of Law, Privatizing Medicare: Hasn't it Always been Private?
William Sage, University of Texas at Austin, Release and Repurpose: Solving the Social and Economic Problem of Low-Yield Health Care

Law, Medicine & Bioethics Session 3B – Room 241
Medical Apology
Moderator: Jonathan Todres, Georgia State University College of Law
Michelle Mello, Stanford Law School and Stanford University School of Medicine, Outcomes of a Communication-and-Resolution Program in Two Massachusetts Hospital Systems
Karen Shaw, Loyola University Chicago School of Law, Just Called to Say ‘I Am Sorry’ - Can We Arbitrate Things Over? The Nursing Home, the Resident, and Post-Dispute Arbitration
John Tingle, Nottingham Law School, Nottingham Trent University, Medical Malpractice and Patient Safety Developments in the UK

Law, Medicine & Bioethics Session 3C – Room 345
Genes
Moderator: Yaniv Heled, Georgia State University College of Law, Genetic Paparazzi
Katherine Drabiak, University of South Florida Health, Re-Writing the Genome: Mitochondrial Manipulation, Epigenetics and the Impact on Human Health
Hank Greely, Stanford Law School and Stanford University School of Medicine, Playing with Life
Eileen Kane, Penn State Law, Legal and Scientific Developments in Human Gene Editing
Browne Lewis, Cleveland State University Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, The Next Evolution: Editing Human Genes
Public Health Law Session 3D – Room 342
Vaccines
Moderator: Stacie Kershner, Georgia State University College of Law
Sam Halabi, University of Missouri School of Law, The Nagoya Protocol and the Future of International Cooperation in Vaccine Research and Development
Nili Karako-Eyal, Haim Striks School of Law and College of Management, Increasing Vaccination Rates through Tort Law: Theoretical and Empirical Insights.
Hillel Levin, University of Georgia School of Law, Vaccination Exemptions and the Constitutional Limits of Religious Freedom
Efthimios Parasidis, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law and College of Public Health, From Public Health to Public Trust: Recalibrating Vaccination Laws

Health Science and Technology Session 3E – Room 245
Data and Technology
Moderator: Jessica Gabel Cino, Georgia State University College of Law
Aziza Ahmed, Northeastern University School of Law, Science, Crime, and Reproduction: The Troubling Case of Purvi Patel
Cynthia Ho, Loyola University Chicago School of Law, "Alternative Facts" From Pharma and Cognitive Bias
Kevin Outterson, Boston University School of Law, Research Opportunities with the CARB-X Database
Nicholson Price, The University of Michigan Law School, Competing Incentives for Early Biomedical Innovation
Natalie Ram, University of Baltimore School of Law, Algorithmic Injustice
Joanna Sax, California Western School of Law, Biotechnology, Controversy and Policy Implementation

Mindfulness Session 3F – Room 346
Mindfulness and Health for Health Lawyers: Fostering the Formation of Professional Identity and Resilience
Moderator, Charity Scott, Georgia State University College of Law, Mindfulness in Law Schools: Addressing the Third Carnegie Apprenticeship to Foster Professional Values, Attitudes, Ethics and Habits of Mind
Austin Charles, Georgia State University College of Law, The Real-World Impact of Mindfulness Practice on Law Students
Monica Halka, Georgia Institute of Technology, Meditation, Mindfulness and Mental Acquity: Relieving Stress and Promoting Student Health, Well-being and Success
Tatiana Posada, Georgia State University College of Law, How I Survied Law School and Developed the Competencies and Qualities that Employers are Looking for Through Mindfulness
Paul Verhaeghen, School of Psychology, Georgia Institute of Technology, The Science Behind Mindfulness: How Mindfulness and Meditation Shape Your Brain, Mind and Life

6:00 – 8:00 PM Reception at the Center for Civil and Human Rights
Presentation of the 2017 Jay Healey Teaching Award
Ted Hutchinson, Executive Director, American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics
Announcement of 2017 Health Law Scholars
Sidney Watson, Saint Louis University School of Law

Saturday, June 10, 2017
7:00 – 8:00 AM Peachtree Fun Run
(Participants meet in the lobby of the Westin Hotel; maps will be provided. No registration required.)
Organizer, Courtney Anderson, Georgia State University College of Law

8:00 – 9:00 AM Breakfast, Henson Atrium, Georgia State Law

9:00 – 10:30 AM Concurrent Sessions 4
Health Care Financing and Regulation Session 4A – Room 342
The Future of Medicaid, Part 2: Progress in the Heat of the Medicaid Battle
Moderator: Sylvia Caley, Georgia State University College of Law
Mary Crossley, University of Pittsburgh School of Law
Mark Hall, Wake Forest University School of Law
Laura Hermer, Mitchell Hamline School of Law
John Jacobi, Seton Hall University School of Law
Sallie Sanford, University of Washington School of Law

Law, Medicine & Bioethics Session 4B – Room 242
Genetics, Discrimination, and Wellness Programs
Moderator: Yaniv Heled, Georgia State University College of Law
Jennifer Bard, University of Cincinnati College of Law, Eight Years Later--Assessing the Protections of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act if the Affordable Care Act is Repealed
Kathy Cerminara, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law, Here We Go Again: Wellness Programs and Genetic Information
Alicia Ouellette, Albany Law School, Geneticism in 2017: Wellness Programs and Beyond
Kayte Spector-Bagdady, University of Michigan Medical School, Liability Implications of Next Generation Sequencing for Genetic Professionals

Law, Medicine & Bioethics Session 4C– Room 245
Reproduction
Moderator: Paul Lombardo, Georgia State University College of Law
Rebecca Feinberg, DePaul University College of Law, Sperm vs. Eggs: An Analysis of Gamete Quarantine in Known Donors
Lauren Flicker, Montefiore Einstein Center for Bioethics, The TRAP Trap: Misunderstandings About the Relationship Between Access to Contraception, Abortion Regulations, and Abortion Rates.
Katarina Lee, Baylor College of Medicine, The Ethical, Medical And Legal Concerns Of Uterine Transplantation In The United States' Artificial Reproductive Technology Market
Lynn Squillace, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Motherhood as punishment: Incarcerated women, abortion, and the Eighth Amendment

Public Health Law Session 4D – Room 241
A Growing Role for the Rule of Law in Public Health Strategies Moderator: Paula Kocher, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Branch, Public Health Division, HHS Office of the General Counsel
Ruth Bernheim, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Legal Capacity-Building, Public Engagement and Community Resiliece in Emergency Planning and Response Jim Misrahi, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Branch, Public Health Division, HHS Office of the General Counsel, CDC's Final Rule Updating Communicable Disease Regulations
Liza Vertinsky, Emory University School of Law, Role of Local Legal Capacity Building as Part of Global Pandemic Preparedness

Health Science and Technology Session 4E – Room 341
Privacy
Moderator: Leslie Wolf, Georgia State University College of Law
Gail Horlick, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, retired, Protecting Privacy in Public Health
Jennifer Huer, Northeastern University School of Law, Balancing Patient Privacy against the Importance of Collecting Social Determinants Data
Anthony Orlando, Wharton University of Pennsylvania, Privacy Perils in Promoting Personal Responsibility in Health
Frank Pasquale, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, The Perils of Automating Health Privacy Compliance
Arnold Rosoff, Wharton University of Pennsylvania, Privacy Perils in Promoting Personal Responsibility in Health

Teaching Session 4F – Room 346
Collaborative Programs: Masters Degrees and MLPs
Moderator: Jimmy Mitchell, Georgia State University College of Law
R. Gregory Cochran, University of California, Hastings College of the Law, UCSF/UC Hastings Health Policy and Law Masters Program: A Report on the Inaugural Year
Daniel Dohan, University of California, San Francisco, UCSF/UC Hastings Health Policy and Law Masters Program: A Report on the Inaugural Year
Jessaca Machado, University of California, San Francisco, UCSF/UC Hastings Health Policy and Law Masters Program: A Report on the Inaugural Year
Dina Shek, University of Hawai'i William S. Richardson School of Law, Medical-Legal Partnership in Hawai‘i: Centering Race through Rebellious Lawyering

10:30 – 10:45 AM Break

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM Concurrent Sessions 5
Health Care Financing and Regulation Session 5A – Room 246
Disclosure, Transparency, and Consumerism
Moderator: Erin Fuse Brown, Georgia State University College of Law, Consumer Financial Protection in Health Care
John Cogan Jr., University of Connecticut School of Law, The Failed Economics of Consumer Directed Health Plans
Wendy Epstein, DePaul University College of Law, Price Transparency and Incomplete Contracts
Max Helveston, DePaul University College of Law, Assessing the Effectiveness of the ACA's Mandatory Disclosure Provisions
Richard Saver, University of North Carolina School of Law and School of Medicine, Fallout From the Sunshine Act

Law, Medicine & Bioethics Session 5B – Room 345
Human Subjects Research
Moderator: Leslie Wolf, Georgia State University College of Law
Jessica Berg, Case Western Reserve University School of Law, Choice Architecture (aka Nudges) and Informed Consent in Human Subjects Research
Benjamin Berkman, National Institutes of Health Department of Bioethics, Reconsidering the Need for Reconsent at 18
Maxwell Mehlman, Case Western Reserve University School of Law and School of Medicine, Choice Architecture (aka Nudges) and Informed Consent in Human Subjects Research

Law, Medicine & Bioethics Session 5C – Room 242
Medical Ethics
Moderator: Sylvia Caley, Georgia State University College of Law
Roy Gilbar, School of Law, Netanya Academic College, Israel, Making Decisions at the End of Life: Do Medical Law and Medical Practice Fit Together?
Jed Adam Gross, University Health Network, Toronto General Hospital, When Transplant Clinicians Object to How Organs Became Available
Jessica Mantel, University of Houston Law Center, Firing Noncompliant Patients Is Not Good Medicine
Evelyn Tenenbaum, Albany Law School, Jumping to the Front of the Transplant Waiting List
Megan Wright, Yale Law School and Weill Cornell Medical College, Relationality and End-of-Life Decision-Making Law and Policy

Law, Medicine & Bioethics Session 5D – Room 245
Access to Abortion in the Age of Zika and a New Presidential Administration
Moderator: Paul Lombardo, Georgia State University College of Law
Linda Fentiman, Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, Zika, Medical Abortion, and the Internet: The Criminal Prosecution of Women Who Use Abortifacient Drugs in Contravention of FDA Regulations and State and Federal Law
Michele Bratcher Goodwin, University of California, Irvine School of Law, How the US Exportation of Soft Law Set Women's Reproductive Health Back Worldwide
Priscilla Smith, Yale Law School, Expressing the Interest in Potential Life: Exploring Methods of and Inconsistencies in Expression
Jonathan Will, Mississippi College School of Law, Restricting Reproductive Choice by Focusing on Pre-born Status: Unanswered Questions from Whole Woman’s Health

Public Health Law Session 5E – Room 241
Winning Hearts, Minds, and Health: The Potential and Challenges of Vaccine Policies
Moderator: Stacie Kershner, Georgia State University College of Law
Dorit Reiss, University of California, Hastings College of the Law, Perception, Conflict and Response in Quarantine Regulatory Change
Jason Schwartz, Yale School of Public Health, The Uncertain Future of Federal Vaccine Financing and Safety Programs
Ross Silverman, Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health and Robert H. McKinney School of Law
Lindsay Wiley, American University Washington College of Law, Shaming Vaccine Refusal
Allison Winnike, University of Houston Law Center, The Politics of Vaccine Laws: Lessons Learned from the Battleground of Texas
Tony Yang, George Mason University, Medical Exemptions in California after SB277

Health and Social Justice Session 5F – Room 341
International Health, Law, Ethics and Human Rights
Moderator: Jonathan Todres, Georgia State University College of Law
Kevin Antoine, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Exploring the Right to Health Care Under International Law
Carl Coleman, Seton Hall University School of Law, Ethical Issues in Marketing Pharmaceuticals in Emerging Economies
Christina Ho, Rutgers School of Law, Reconstructing the Right to Health as a Negative Procedural Right: Health Impact Assessments
Wendy Mariner, Boston University School of Public Health and School of Law, Why Health Policy Needs Human Rights Now More Than Ever
Gerard Porter, University of Edinburgh, Drug Regulatory Agencies: Guardians of the Ethics of International Clinical Trials?

“Half-Baked” Ideas Workshop Session 5G – Room 346
Moderators: Wendy Hensel, Georgia State University College of Law
Charity Scott, Georgia State University College of Law

12:15 – 1:15 PM Lunch, Knowles Conference Center, Georgia State Law
Torch Passing to Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Leslie Wolf, Georgia State University College of Law

1:15 – 1:30 PM Break

1:30 – 3:00 PM Concurrent Sessions 6
Health Care Financing and Regulation Session 6A – Room 342
Competition, Health Promotion, and Tax IncentivesModerator: Erin Fuse Brown, Georgia State University College of Law
Thomas Greaney, Saint Louis University School of Law, Coping with Concentration
Gwendolyn Majette, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Competition, Quality & the High Cost Provider
Ann Marie Marciarille, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law, What's A Hospital For?
Govind Persad, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Taxing Health Choices: Legal and Ethical Considerations
Lauren Roth, St. John's University School of Law, Data Mining for Precision Taxation in Health Financing

Law, Medicine & Bioethics Session 6B – Room 246
Innovations in Informed Consent Law
Moderator: Paul Lombardo, Georgia State University College of Law
Marc Ginsberg, The John Marshall Law School (Chicago), Informed Consent-No Longer Just What The Doctor Ordered-Revisited
Valarie Gutmann Koch, DePaul University College of Law, Informed Consent Parity in Treatment and Research
Thaddeus Pope, Mitchell Hamline School of Law, Solving Persistent Problems of Informed Consent Law with Federally Certified Patient Decision Making Aids
Nadia Sawicki, Loyola University Chicago School of Law, Beyond Informed Consent: Assumption of Risk for Untraditional Treatments

Public Health Law Session 6C – Room 345
Drug and Addiction Policy
Moderator: Jonathan Todres, Georgia State University College of Law
Taleed El-Sabawi, The Ohio State University College of Public Health, Congress, Health & Addiction: What motivated Congress to act?
Diane Hoffmann, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, Why DEA and FDA's Strategy for Medical Marijuana is Unlikely to Work
Bhavani Madisetti-Vemireddy, South University Austin, Can the Federal Government Effectively Eradicate the Explosive Opioid Addiction Epidemic in the United States?

Public Health Law Session 6D – Room 245
Infectious Disease Control and Prevention
Moderator: Leslie Wolf, Georgia State University College of Law
Robert Gatter, Saint Louis University School of Law, Infectious Disease, Public Health, and
CDC’s New Final Regulations on Quarantine and Isolation
Michael Greenberger, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, Zika’s Long Emergency: Public Health Emergency Laws and Incidents of Long Duration
Trudy Henson, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, Zika’s Long Emergency: Public Health Emergency Laws and Incidents of Long Duration Michael Ulrich, Boston University School of Public Health, Director or Dictator? The CDC Quarantine Regulations and the Importance of Cooperation in Infectious Disease Control
Yanbai Andrea Wang, Stanford Law School, Persistence and Dynamism: International Infectious Disease Law Through The Ages

Health Sciences and Technology Session 6E – Room 242
FDA
Moderator: Patricia Zettler, Georgia State University College of Law, Closing the Regulatory Gap for Synthetic Nicotine
Sarah Duranske, Stanford Law School, Stem Cells and the Right to Try
Craig Konnoth, University of Pennsylvania Law School, New York University School of Medicine, Side Effects: A Broader Perspective on Drug Approval
Jordan Paradise, Loyola University Chicago School of Law, Cultivating Innovation in Precision Medicine through Regulatory Flexibility at the FDA
Rachel Sachs, Washington University in St. Louis School of Law, Administering Health Innovation Policy
Ana Santos Rutschman, DePaul College of Law, FDA as a Catalyst for Health Innovation: Reassessing Incentives to Pharmaceutical R&D

Health and Social Welfare 6F – Room 341
Health Law and Health Equity
Moderator: Courtney Anderson, Georgia State University College of Law
Daniel Dawes, Morehouse School of Medicine, Overview of the Health Equity Movement Up To and Including the ACA
Medha Makhlouf, Pennsylvania State University Dickinson Law, Immigrants’ Limited Access to Health Care
Dayna Matthew, University of Colorado Law School, Empirical Evidence MLPs Improve Health Equity by Addressing Discriminatory Distribution of the Social Determinants of Health
Elizabeth Pendo, Saint Louis University School of Law, Integration of Law and Policy into Public Health Goals Related to Disability Health Inequities

Late Breaking Topics 6G – Room 241
Charity Scott, Georgia State University College of Law

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

04/26/2017

All We Need is (Unconditional) Love

On March 24, 2017, Joe Gibes posted an entry on this blog, entitled “A ‘disabled’ person speaks out against a particular form of discrimination.”[1] That post featured links to several stories about Kathleen Humberstone, a young woman with Down Syndrome who spoke at a recent UN event commemorating World Down Syndrome Day, which was observed on March 21. After reading through Joe’s post and the... // Read More »

Full Article

04/26/2017

What Are the Biggest Forces Driving Change in the Healthcare Marketplace?

Here is what one group of experts thought: The post What Are the Biggest Forces Driving Change in the Healthcare Marketplace? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Peter Ubel. Bookmark the permalink.

04/26/2017

Kathleen Sebelius – Big Ideas in End-of-Life Care (video)

The Center for Practical Bioethics has posted videos from its annual dinner and symposium that included Kathleen Sebelius speaking about the new Aspen Institute report on Improving Care at the End of Life. The Center is a nonprofit, free-standing...

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

04/25/2017

Why I Marched

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

This past Saturday, I donned by pink knitted brain hat and joined 40,000 other scientists and allies in Chicago’s Grant Park. This unprecedented gathering was to make a statement that science is important and should be publicly supported. The march was a protest against proposed budget cuts for the EPA, NIH, CDC as well as the dismissal of scientific facts by elected officials. The March was not partisan but it was political, sending a message that federal support for science should be unwavering.

To see so many people out to support science was exciting. I saw creative costumes such as an 8-foot long, articulated dinosaur skeleton, bees, and a plush microbe.…

Full Article

This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Politics, Science and tagged . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

04/25/2017

Genetic Fingerprints and National Security

by Beau P. Sperry, Megan Allyse & Richard R. Sharp

Biometric surveillance is rapidly becoming an integral component of national security policy and practice. Biometric surveillance can include fingerprinting, facial and voice recognition, and iris scans. In 2002, in response to the September 11th attacks, the United States passed the Enhanced Border Security and Visa Entry Reform Act, which requires visa applicants to submit ten fingerprints to a national security database. Japan has been collecting fingerprints from its visitors since 2007 and many European nations are following suit, including the United Kingdom. Singapore began fingerprinting visitors in 2016, while the United Arab Emirates has gone a step further and now collects iris scans.…

Full Article

This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Genetics, Privacy and tagged , , . Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.

04/25/2017

Does a Church Service a Week Keep the Doctor Away?

Religious belief has many health benefits. For some people, religious belief reduces existential angst, the reduction in stress leading to lower blood pressure and a stronger immune system. For others, religious belief gives their lives purpose, that purpose motivating them … Continue reading

The post Does a Church Service a Week Keep the Doctor Away? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Peter Ubel. Bookmark the permalink.

04/25/2017

Could we be marsupials?

Four scientists have just announced, in Nature Communications, that they have successfully created an artificial womb in which “extremely premature” lambs were nurtured for four weeks, enough to make them ready to meet the world.  The goal is to advance this technology until it is available for very premature (23-26 week) human infants.  At present, … Continue reading Could we be marsupials?

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by denasdavis. Bookmark the permalink.