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10/18/2017

Structural Injustice of the Academic Conference

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

We have come to that magical time of year again when academic and professional organizations hold their annual meetings. Thousands of educators, researchers, and scholars fly from all over the country (and the world) to descend upon one city. They will spend 2-5 days giving and listening to talks, networking, learning about new opportunities, meeting with publishers and potential employers, and advancing conversations in their field. Most faculty members’ jobs have expectations that they will attend and contribute to these conferences. While I do thoroughly enjoy these conferences (and am heading to three in the next month) I am troubled by the social inequality that these meetings create and perpetuate.…

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10/17/2017

Dr. Smartphone

My brother tells me my doctoring days are done. We keep up a lively, ongoing email discussion of current technologies as they relate to topics such as big data analysis, Internet of Things (IoT), and smartphone technology. He recently challenged me that due to the rapid increase in computational power and sophistication of data analysis, smartphones will soon replace doctors as the main source of... // Read More »

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10/17/2017

Brain Death Conflict – Taquisha Desirae McKitty

On September 14, 2017, 27-year old Taquisha Desirae McKitty was brought to Brampton Civic Hospital suffering from a drug overdose. After six days, doctors declared her brain dead despite her family’s wishes.

The family filed an injunction to keep McKitty on organ support. On September 28th, Superior Court Justice M.J. Shaw extended that injunction to October 17th so that the family could obtain a second opinion from another physician. It is unclear that they have obtained such an opinion.



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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

10/16/2017

12% of Patients Receive “Futile" Treatment

Hannah Carter A new Australian study determined that 12% of end-of-life treatment was "futile" as determined by a consensus of clinicians.   This corroborates a figure determined a few years ago in a study at UCLA in the United States. Cl...

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10/15/2017

NJ Judge Recognizes Cause of Action for Wrongful Prolongation of Life

Earlier this year, I argued that courts are becoming more receptive to tort claims when clinicians administer life-sustaining treatments contrary to patient wishes or instructions.  The New York Times picked up on my piece. Now, the New Jersey Law Journal reports that yet another case has joined this trend.  

Morris County, NJ Superior Court Judge W. Hunt Dumont declined to grant summary judgment in favor of defendants, Morristown Medical Center, Dr. Andrew Youseff and several nurses for their role in prolonging the life of Suzanna Stica. “Defendants violated Ms. Stica’s rights when they resuscitated her against the clear directives.” 

Despite those orders, the defendants resuscitated Stica after she went into cardiac arrest. She lived another six months before she finally died. During that time, she experienced pain and suffering.

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10/14/2017

Charlie Gard Redux – Isaiah Hasstrup and Pediatric Medical Futility Conflicts in London

Clinicians at King's College Hospital say that giving further intensive care treatment to seven-month-old Isaiah Haastrup is "futile, burdensome and not in his best interests." The baby's parents, Takesha Thomas and Lanre Hasstrup, want his treatment ...

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10/14/2017

Two New Medical Futility Cases in Canada

Hassan Rasouli After the Supreme Court of Canada's decision in Rasouli, clinicians across Canada have generally been "chilled" from standing up to surrogates who demanded potentially inappropriate life-sustaining treatment.  But two new cases s...

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10/13/2017

ASBH 2017 – Law Sessions

Join me on Saturday, October 21 at 12:45p in Empire C for "Effecting Change, Impacting Policy."

In this tumultuous political climate, ethicists’ expertise can be invaluable in educating policymakers about the implications of potential changes to law and policy. Ethicists with legal experience and knowledge can help effect important changes at the national and local level – whether by drafting amicus briefs, submitting comments on proposed administrative regulations, or lobbying legislators. This panel will bring together experts at the intersection of law and ethics who have been successful in impacting policy on issues relevant to the ASBH community.

The panel includes:

Kirstin Matthews, Rice University's Institute Baker Institute for Public Policy
Thaddeus Pope, Mitchell Hamline School of Law
Carrie Zoubul, C.A. Goldberg, PLLC

Also join me on Friday, October 20 at 10:45a for the "Top 10 Legal Developments in Bioethics" with Art Derse, Paul Lombardo, and Valerie Gutmann Koch.

I will also be two more things.  First, I will do a "Meet the Professor" at 7:00a on Friday October 20.  Second, I will do a session on pregnant dead women on Saturday, October 21 at 8:00a.


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10/13/2017

BioethicsTV (October 9-13, 2017): Drinking on transplant list; big pharma in pandemics; mortality forces morality

The Good Doctor (Season 1; Episode 3): A Patient Takes A Drink While on the Transplant List

This week, a patient is finally at the top of the list for a heart transplant. The heart is at a hospital on the other side of the Bay and through a series of obstacles, getting the liver to the hospital while still viable becomes a challenge. At the same time, a final series of blood tests shows that the patient had a drink. The viewer is told that to be eligible for the transplant, the patient cannot have had alcohol for the prior 6 months.…

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10/13/2017

Hospice and Palliative Care

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE THIRD-PLACE WINNER By Maia Lauria I first stumbled upon the issue of palliative care during a particularly hard time in my life. I was twenty years old, and for the first time having to confront the realities of watching a loved one die. Up until then, death had been a … More Hospice and Palliative Care

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