Tag: clinical ethics

Blog Posts (21)

November 17, 2015

What Should Clinicians and Bioethicists Tolerate?

by J.S. Blumenthal-Barby

Last week I attended a talk by German philosopher Rainer Forst on “Toleration and Democracy”. Professor Forst, a student of Habarmas, was named “the most important political philosopher of his generation” in 2012.…

July 15, 2013

Clinical Ethics Survey Responses Needed!!!

ATTENTION: HEALTH CARE ETHICS CONSULTANTS

The American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) would like your input.

Please take part in this short (8 question) survey to determine whether you endorse the FINAL DRAFT of the Code of Ethics for Health Care Ethics Consultants:

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/YNBZFLZ

(Paste link in browser if survey doesn’t load by clicking on it.)

It should take about 10-15 minutes to complete.…

May 28, 2013

Good People Doing Bad Things for Good Reasons

Maurice Bernstein, MD

What is ethical or not is often in the eye of the beholder. That is why often the ethics of decisions or acts that we deal with in medicine is established through the process of consensus.…

April 2, 2013

The Ethics of "Hand-Offs" in Medicine

Maurice Bernstein, M.D.

Here is a realistic scenario as written in the U.S. government’s Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality “Web M&M” website which could occur in any teaching or even in non-teaching hospital with hospitalists on duty.

March 13, 2013

Is What Is Ethical Lies "In The Eye Of The Beholder"?

Maurice Bernstein, M.D.

On my bioethics blog I wrote a post titled “Good People Do Bad Things for Good Reasons”. I suggested in that post that “what is ethical or not is often in the eye of the beholder”.

March 5, 2013

The Diabetes Challenge

Jennifer Chevinsky, B.S.

A recent study found a strong association between the number of test strips covered by insurance and better medical care in type 1 diabetics.…

February 19, 2013

"Innovative Treatment" vs Research: Which Is It?

Maurice Bernstein, M.D.

When does a doctor’s treatment of a patient become medical or surgical research? If what the doctor does is a standard and accepted method of therapy using proven medications or surgical techniques and represents nothing novel then at first glance what is occurring cannot be designated as research or can it?

February 14, 2013

Diagnosing Art

Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Every fall, I teach 30 medical and nursing students observation skills in our institution’s Art Rounds course. My colleagues and I take these students to one of our local museums where they learn how to observe their environment and patients by looking at works of art, learning about the role of observation in medicine, and by observing real life models.

February 6, 2013

Paging Dr. Howser

Jennifer Chevinsky, B.S.

Hospitals in Adelaide, Australia had seen a young man looking like a doctor wandering hospital halls. Was this a case of Doogie Howser, M.D.…

February 4, 2013

Military Doctors and Deaths by Torture: When a Witness Becomes an Accessory

Guest Blog Post: Steven Miles, M.D.

This blog post will appears as an Editorial in this May’s upcoming issue of AJOB

A Case (and Context)

The Medical Practitioner Tribunal Service in the United Kingdom recently revoked a physician’s license for failing to report treating a man who had been tortured and for failing to safeguard vulnerable detainees.…

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Published Articles (47)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 3 - Mar 2017

The Precautionary Principle and the Tolerability of Blood Transfusion Risks Koen Kramer, Hans L. Zaaijer & Marcel F. Verweij

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

When are primary care physicians untruthful with patients? A qualitative study Stephanie R. Morain, Lisa I. Iezzoni, Michelle M. Mello, Elyse R. Park, Joshua P. Metlay, Gabrielle Horner & Eric G. Campbell

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

Decision making in pediatric oncology: Views of parents and physicians in two European countries Domnita O. Badarau, Katharina Ruhe, Thomas Kühne, Eva De Clercq, Anca Colita, Bernice S. Elger & Tenzin Wangmo

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

Better to know than to imagine: Including children in their health care Tenzin Wangmo, Eva De Clercq, Katharina M. Ruhe, Maja Beck-Popovic, Johannes Rischewski, Regula Angst, Marc Ansari & Bernice S. Elger

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 2 - Feb 2017

Irrational Exuberance: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation as Fetish Philip M. Rosoff & Lawrence J. Schneiderman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 2 - Feb 2017

LVAD-DT: Culture of Rescue and Liminal Experience in the Treatment of Heart Failure Frances K. Barg, Katherine Kellom, Tali Ziv, Sarah C. Hull, Selena Suhail-Sindhu & James N. Kirkpatrick

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 2 - Feb 2017

CPR and Ventricular Assist Devices: The Challenge of Prolonging Life Without Guaranteeing Health David Magnus & Danton Char

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 12 - Dec 2016

A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress Stephen M. Campbell, Connie M. Ulrich & Christine Grady

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 12 - Dec 2016

Moral Distress in Clinical Ethics: Expanding the Concept Alyssa M. Burgart & Katherine E. Kruse

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

Diagnosis by Documentary: Professional Responsibilities in Informal Encounters Alistair Wardrope & Markus Reuber

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News (90)

February 10, 2017 9:00 am

Brain researchers fight National Hockey League’s demand for records (Science)

A pair of Boston University (BU) brain researchers is pushing back against demands by the National Hockey League (NHL) that they release data, brain pathology slides, and interview records of former NHL players and their families. The scientists accumulated the records during their research on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative disease that has been linked to repetitive head trauma.

February 2, 2017 9:00 am

Gene drives thwarted by emergence of resistant organisms (Nature)

By studying the insects under more-natural conditions, scientists hope to better understand how to eradicate them — and malaria — using an emerging genetic-engineering technology called gene drives. The technique can quickly disseminate genetic modifications in wild populations through an organism’s offspring, prompting some activists to call for it to be shelved. Yet gene drives might not be as effective as activists think. Recent research has identified a major hurdle to using them to eliminate diseases and vanquish invasive pests: evolution.

January 26, 2017 9:00 am

Human tissues in a dish: The research and ethical implications of organoid technology (Science)

Growing functional human tissues and organs would provide much needed material for regeneration and repair. New technologies are taking us in that direction. In addition to their use in regenerative medicine, stem cells that grow and morph into organ-like structures known as organoids can be used in drug development and toxicology testing. The potential developments and possibilities are numerous and affect not only biomedicine but also areas of ongoing ethical debate.

January 19, 2017 9:00 am

Pharmacological rescue of diabetic skeletal stem cell niches (Science)

Stem cells: The key to boosting bone healing in diabetes

January 16, 2017 9:00 am

How Gene Editing Could Ruin Human Evolution (Time)

CRISPR may be used to repair a gene that has a deficient product, such as an enzyme or receptor, or alter code that merely suggests of risk. Ideas on how to use it change hourly. The method is here to last. The ethics will only get more fraught.

January 13, 2017 9:00 am

Successful Ebola vaccine will be fast-tracked for use (BBC News)

Trials conducted in Guinea, one of the West African countries most affected by an outbreak of Ebola that ended this year, show it offers 100% protection. The vaccine is now being fast-tracked for regulatory approval.

January 9, 2017 9:00 am

Fact-checking Congress’s fetal tissue report (Science)

They interviewed senior physicians from Planned Parenthood, who spoke bluntly about their provision of fetal tissue from legal abortions for medical research

December 20, 2016 9:00 am

OxyContin goes global — “We’re only just getting started” (LA Times)

Former U.S. Food and Drug Administration commissioner David A. Kessler has called the failure to recognize the dangers of painkillers one of the biggest mistakes in modern medicine.

November 17, 2016 9:00 am

CRISPR gene-editing tested in a person for the first time (Nature)

A Chinese group has become the first to inject a person with cells that contain genes edited using the revolutionary CRISPR–Cas9 technique.

November 11, 2016 8:00 am

Colorado passes medical aid in dying, joining five other states (Denver Post)

Colorado passed a medical aid in dying measure Tuesday that will allow adults suffering from terminal illness to take life-ending, doctor-prescribed sleeping medication.

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