Tag: science

Blog Posts (3)

August 4, 2010

Could (or Should) Bioethicists Prevent These 14 Inevitable Scientific Breakthroughs from Changing The World?

For just a little levity on a Wednesday, click on this link at Cracked.com to see their reader’s picks for the 14 Inevitable Scientific Breakthroughs The World Will Regret!…

July 22, 2009

Chi-Town Is A-Buzz With Bioethics Happenings...

Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry is encouraging the Chicagoland area to come out for a panel discussion about bioethical issues fed from topics and questions sent from Twitter and Facebook, says the Chicago Trib.…

September 16, 2008

Similar on Science: Obama and McCain

Finally, both presidential candidates have answered questions about the hot science policy issues from the Science Debate 2008. As the NYT reports.…

Published Articles (3)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 4 - Apr 2015

Ideology and Microbiology: Ebola, Science, and Deliberative Democracy Joseph J. Fins

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 10 Issue 11 - Nov 2010

Review of Emily Monosson, Ed., Motherhood, The Elephant in the Laboratory: Women Scientists Speak Out

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 7 Issue 9 - Sep 2007

Rethinking Neuroethics in the Light of the Extended Mind Thesis

News (82)

March 17, 2017 9:00 am

Beware emotional robots: Giving feelings to artificial beings could backfire, study suggests (Science)

Previous work has shown a discomfort with humanlike robots, with people ascribing more emotions to them. In a study published by the psychologists Kurt Gray of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and Daniel Wegner in 2012, participants watched a brief video of a robot’s head either from the front, where they could see its “human” face, or from behind, where they saw electrical components. The ones who watched its face rated it as more capable of feeling pain and fear, and as a result they felt more “creeped out.”

March 2, 2017 9:00 am

An epigenetics gold rush: new controls for gene expression (Nature)

Over the past few years, researchers have identified some of the machinery involved in regulating these marks. Each requires a writer to place it, an eraser to remove it and a reader to interpret it. As the identities of these proteins emerged, scientists have come to understand that m6A affects not only RNA splicing, but also translation and RNA stability.

March 1, 2017 9:00 am

Ebola funding surge hides falling investment in other neglected diseases (Nature)

Global funding for research on neglected diseases — which include tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and malaria — is at its lowest level since 2007, according to the annual G-FINDER investment report by Policy Cures Research, a health-policy analysis firm in Sydney, Australia.

February 28, 2017 9:00 am

Biologists propose to sequence the DNA of all life on Earth (Science)

Yesterday, at a meeting here organized by the Smithsonian Initiative on Biodiversity Genomics and the Shenzhen, China–based sequencing powerhouse BGI, a small group of researchers upped the ante even more, announcing their intent to, eventually, sequence “all life on Earth.”

February 27, 2017 9:00 am

U.S. researchers guilty of misconduct later won more than $100 million in NIH grants, study finds (Science)

Overall, 23 of the scientists (roughly 8% of sanctioned researchers) received NIH funding after receiving an ORI sanction. Of that group, 17 researchers won more than $101 million for 61 new projects. Thirteen continued to receive funding from NIH grants that had been awarded before being sanctioned.

February 24, 2017 9:00 am

The Birth of CRISPR Inc (Science)

As the science grew even more compelling and venture capital (VC) beckoned, the jockeying to start CRISPR companies became intense. The research community was rent apart by concerns about intellectual property, academic credit, Nobel Prize dreams, geography, media coverage, egos, personal profit, and loyalty. A billion dollars poured into what might be called CRISPR Inc.

February 22, 2017 6:00 am

Artificial intelligence grows a nose (Science)

Now, 22 teams of computer scientists have unveiled a set of algorithms able to predict the odor of different molecules based on their chemical structure. It remains to be seen how broadly useful such programs will be, but one hope is that such algorithms may help fragrancemakers and food producers design new odorants with precisely tailored scents.

January 27, 2017 9:00 am

Japanese military entices academics to break taboo (Science)

In 1950, Japan’s scientific community, chastened by the complicity of researchers in their nation’s disastrous military adventurism, took an extraordinary vow. “To preserve our integrity as scientists, we express our firm commitment both domestically and abroad that we will never pursue scientific research for the purpose of war,” declared the Science Council of Japan (SCJ), now the nation’s equivalent to the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

January 11, 2017 9:00 am

Capital Weather Gang U.S. posts second-warmest year on record, breadth of warmth ‘unparalleled’ (Washington Post)

Every single state and every single city in the Lower 48 states was warmer than normal in 2016.

January 6, 2017 9:00 am

How drones could become a farmer’s best friend (Science)

Researchers have now used images captured by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to map barley fields and determine which rows of plants are most in need of water

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