Hot Topics: Animal Ethics

Blog Posts (7)

May 8, 2017

Woolgathering: It’s a Bag, It’s a Baby, It’s an Artificial Womb!

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

An announcement last week took the science dream of an artificial womb one step closer to science fact: premature lambs were gestated in a biobag (technically an “extra-uterine system”).…

February 17, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: February 17, 2017

Politics Trump Ethics Monitor: Has The President Kept His Promises? To track Trump’s ethics-related promises, NPR checked debate transcripts, campaign speeches and press conferences Trump’s South Florida estate raises ethics questions Ethics questions and possible conflicts surrounding President Donald Trump’s frequent trips to his sprawling Mar-a-Lago property, especially in regards to the invitation of Japanese Prime … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: February 17, 2017
November 11, 2016

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: November 11, 2016

President-Elect Trump and Ethics Trump and Pence on science, in their own words Donald Trump and Mike Pence’s career and campaign track record of false claims about science, rejection of research conclusions and dangerous rhetoric on misconceptions such as vaccines and autism … Continue reading
July 29, 2015

Cecil the Lion: Can Health Care Professionals Ethically Be Sport Hunters

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In James Patterson’s book (and now TV miniseries) Zoo, the animals have acquired an intelligence that removes their fear of humans.…

January 26, 2015

Can Bioethicists (in Good Conscience) Watch the NFL?

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Every year the National Football League (NFL) makes between an estimated $7 billion- $9 billion making it the most profitable American professional sports league.…

December 29, 2014

A Monkey’s Uncle: A Nonhuman Person in an Argentinean Zoo

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

A court in Argentina has ruled that Sandra, an orangutan is a nonhuman person who is deserving of some rights.…

May 7, 2014

Philosopher Calls for End to Animal Experimentation (and more): Is there a “reasonable” conception of animal rights?

by J.S. Blumenthal-Barby, MA, PhD

According to Christine Korsgaard, one of the leading moral philosophers in the Western world and Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University, the answer is yes.…

Published Articles (1)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

We Can and Must Rebuild the Bridges of Interdisciplinary Bioethics Darryl R. J. Macer

News (67)

September 15, 2017 9:00 am

PETA versus the postdoc: Animal rights group targets young researcher for first time (Science)

PETA and other animal rights groups have hounded researchers for decades in hopes of shutting down animal experiments in the United States and elsewhere. But Lattin is an unusual target. She’s a self-professed animal lover with a background in bird rescue; her studies are far less invasive than the research PETA has traditionally gone after; and she’s only a postdoc, much younger and less established than any scientist the group has singled out before.

August 24, 2017 9:00 am

Zebrafish implanted with a cancer patient’s tumor could guide cancer treatment (Science)

To create mouse avatars, researchers implant some of a patient’s cancer cells into rodents lacking a normal immune system and measure whether various drugs destroy the tumors that sprout in the animals. But the mice are expensive to create and typically require between 2 and 6 months to deliver a verdict.

August 15, 2017 9:00 am

Horse Clones Start Heading to the Races (Bloomberg News)

So far, the big winner in the great clone race has been Alan Meeker, chief executive officer of Crestview Genetics. Since 2010 the 52-year-old Texas oil heir has created close to 100 horse clones valued at $500,000 to $800,000 each, depending on how long the company’s raised them.

August 10, 2017 9:00 am

First genetically engineered salmon sold in Canada (Nature)

Genetically engineered salmon has reached the dinner table. AquaBounty Technologies, the Maynard, Massachusetts, company that developed the fish, announced on 4 August that it has sold 10,000 pounds (4,535 kilograms) of its hotly debated product to customers in Canada.

August 4, 2017 9:00 am

Chimpanzees are first animal shown to develop telltale markers of Alzheimer's disease (Nature)

Aged chimpanzees develop brain characteristics that are similar — but not identical — to those seen in early Alzheimer’s disease in humans, researchers report on 1 August in Neurobiology of Aging. The findings from humanity’s closest relatives could help researchers to understand why people develop dementia, as well as suggest that caretakers of aging, captive chimpanzees watch them closely for behavioural changes.

July 21, 2017 9:00 am

Scientists plan to trick Zika-carrying mosquitoes into breeding themselves out of existence (Washington Post)

This summer, a Silicon Valley tech company will have millions of machine-raised, bacteria-infected mosquitoes packed into windowless white vans, driven inland and released into the wild — or, at least, the streets of Fresno, Calif. And, yes, Fresno County officials are encouraging this. It’s all part of the “Debug Fresno” project, which aims to cut down on the number of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, an unwelcome invasive species that arrived in California’s Central Valley in 2013.

April 26, 2017 12:30 pm

Fluid-filled ‘biobag’ allows premature lambs to develop outside the womb (Science)

Overcoming engineering, biology, and technology obstacles, a team of researchers has crafted what may be the best artificial womb yet: a fluid-filled bag in which lambs born early can live for up to 4 weeks, before being ushered into the outside world. Although others have designed similar systems that are still in animal testing, this one is notable for its stripped-down simplicity.

April 21, 2017 9:00 am

Young human blood makes old mice smarter (Nature)

Blood from younger humans may have similar rejuvenating effects on older animals as blood from young mice.

April 13, 2017 9:00 am

US regulators test organs-on-chips for food safety monitoring (Nature)

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has started testing whether livers-on-a-chip — miniature ‘organs’ engineered to mimic biological functions — can reliably model human reactions to food and foodborne illnesses. The experiments will help the agency to determine whether companies can substitute chip data for animal data when applying for approval of a new compound, such as a food additive, that could prove toxic. It is the first time a regulatory agency anywhere in the world has pursued organs-on-chips as an alternative to animal testing.

April 7, 2017 9:00 am

Few U.S. animal inspections are being posted (Science)

The Donald Trump administration appears to have reversed its decision to remove from public sight the results of past government inspections of animal research facilities. But getting hold of new inspection reports is proving to be another matter. An animal welfare researcher has found that only four reports have been posted during the first quarter of 2017.

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