Hot Topics: Animal Ethics

Blog Posts (9)

January 25, 2018

Monkey See, Human Do: Cloning Macaque Monkeys with Fetal Cells

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

 “How afraid of human cloning should we be?”
Monkeys have been cloned, Paving the way for human cloning
Yes, They’ve Cloned Monkeys in China.

January 12, 2018

Whose Rights are Right?: The Debate Over Animal Rights in Research

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE HONORABLE MENTION By Brianna Blunck Animal research has been conventionally practiced under the notion that it has played a vital role in scientific and medical advances, but our use of animals should not continue without periods of reflection on the morality and necessity of their use. George Yancy, PhD and … More Whose Rights are Right?: The Debate Over Animal Rights in Research
May 8, 2017

Woolgathering: It’s a Bag, It’s a Baby, It’s an Artificial Womb!

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

An announcement last week took the science dream of an artificial womb one step closer to science fact: premature lambs were gestated in a biobag (technically an “extra-uterine system”).…

February 17, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: February 17, 2017

Politics Trump Ethics Monitor: Has The President Kept His Promises? To track Trump’s ethics-related promises, NPR checked debate transcripts, campaign speeches and press conferences Trump’s South Florida estate raises ethics questions Ethics questions and possible conflicts surrounding President Donald Trump’s frequent trips to his sprawling Mar-a-Lago property, especially in regards to the invitation of Japanese Prime … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: February 17, 2017
November 11, 2016

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: November 11, 2016

President-Elect Trump and Ethics Trump and Pence on science, in their own words Donald Trump and Mike Pence’s career and campaign track record of false claims about science, rejection of research conclusions and dangerous rhetoric on misconceptions such as vaccines and autism … Continue reading
July 29, 2015

Cecil the Lion: Can Health Care Professionals Ethically Be Sport Hunters

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In James Patterson’s book (and now TV miniseries) Zoo, the animals have acquired an intelligence that removes their fear of humans.…

January 26, 2015

Can Bioethicists (in Good Conscience) Watch the NFL?

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Every year the National Football League (NFL) makes between an estimated $7 billion- $9 billion making it the most profitable American professional sports league.…

December 29, 2014

A Monkey’s Uncle: A Nonhuman Person in an Argentinean Zoo

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

A court in Argentina has ruled that Sandra, an orangutan is a nonhuman person who is deserving of some rights.…

May 7, 2014

Philosopher Calls for End to Animal Experimentation (and more): Is there a “reasonable” conception of animal rights?

by J.S. Blumenthal-Barby, MA, PhD

According to Christine Korsgaard, one of the leading moral philosophers in the Western world and Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University, the answer is yes.…

Published Articles (5)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 11 - Nov 2018

One Health, Bioethics, and Nonhuman Ethics Simon Coghlan & Benjamin Coghlan

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 10 - Oct 2018

The One Health Approach to Zoonotic Emerging Infectious Diseases Ariadne Nichol & David Magnus

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 10 - Oct 2018

A Radical Approach to Ebola: Saving Humans and Other Animals Sarah J. L. Edwards, Charles H. Norell, Phyllis Illari, Brendan Clarke & Carolyn P. Neuhaus

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 2 - Feb 2018

Resolving Ethical Dilemmas in a Tertiary Care Veterinary Specialty Hospital: Adaptation of the Human Clinical Consultation Committee Model Philip M. Rosoff, Jeannine Moga, Bruce Keene, Christopher Adin, Callie Fogle, Rachel Ruderman, Heather Hopkinso & Charity Weyhrauch

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

We Can and Must Rebuild the Bridges of Interdisciplinary Bioethics Darryl R. J. Macer

News (77)

November 9, 2018 9:00 am

Dogs Can Detect Malaria. How Useful Is That? (The New York Times)

small pilot study has shown that dogs can accurately identify socks worn overnight by children infected with malaria parasites — even when the children had cases so mild that they were not feverish.

September 27, 2018 1:44 pm

Gene editing could eliminate mosquitoes, but is it a good idea? (CNN)

Researchers used a gene editing tool, CRISPR, to wipe out a population of malaria-carrying mosquitoes in the lab. Questions remain about how releasing this technology into the wild would impact the environment.

September 25, 2018 9:00 am

Veterans Struggling After Sexual Assault Increasingly Turn To Service Dogs (NPR)

Service dog providers are seeing an influx of applications from veterans like Michel who have experienced sexual trauma while in the military. But the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, which provides veterinary benefits for service dogs assigned to people with physical disabilities, does not currently recognize psychiatric service dogs as a proven therapy for mental illness.

September 13, 2018 10:15 am

A Deadly Virus Threatens Millions Of Pigs In China (NPR)

In a little more than a month, some 897 pigs have died and nearly 20,000 have been culled to try and prevent the virus from spreading.

August 14, 2018 9:00 am

Too cute? Colleges, courts grapple with the role of companion animals (CNN)

Colleges have also seen an uptick in the number of registered emotional support animals on campus. Unlike facility dogs, emotional support animals need not be dogs nor obtain specific training, but a person who wants one must have documentation from a health professional to show a disability and a disability-related need for the animal in order to obtain protection under the Fair Housing Act. Such protection allows the animals to live in places where they may otherwise be prohibited. Amid this influx of animals, classrooms and courtrooms are grappling with where to draw the line.
August 2, 2018 6:32 am

Experts: Don’t use dog DNA tests to make life-or-death decisions (The Mercury News)

The claims dog DNA-testing companies make can seem all but definitive: One quick cheek swab can tell you not only about the breeds that make up your pooch but also offer it a lifetime of health. Pay $65, and you can make smarter, science-based decisions about veterinary care. You can be a more responsible dog owner. But three canine genetics experts have now hurled cold water on those claims, saying the entire business of consumer-marketed canine genetics testing is an “untamed wilderness” of weak science, unvalidated outcomes and conflicts of interest.

November 29, 2017 9:00 am

How to get enough protein, without meat (Washington Post)

If they’re eating enough vegetarian sources of protein, iron and B vitamins, even athletes can get along just fine.

November 21, 2017 9:00 am

This scientist wants your help tracking mosquitoes—and all you need is a cellphone (Science)

Mosquitoes can be deadly, transmitting malaria, dengue, and Zika. But tracking them is tough. Now, researchers—led by bioengineer Manu Prakash of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California—have developed a new, cheap way to monitor these insects with mobile phones and a Shazam-like app that tells them apart based on their “songs.”

October 25, 2017 9:00 am

These gene-edited pigs are hearty and lean—but how will they taste? (Science)

“Lean” may not be the term you associate with a good bacon strip or pork chop. But these leaner, cold-hardier piglets, created through CRISPR gene editing, could be a hit with the pork industry.

September 20, 2017 9:00 am

CRISPR reveals genetic master switches behind butterfly wing patterns (Nature)

The brilliant, intricate patterns on butterfly wings — from haunting eye spots to iridescent splashes of blue — look as if they were painted on by teams of artists. Researchers thought that a complex collection of genes might be responsible, interacting to build up the final pattern. But two studies now suggest that two genes play an outsize role in determining the wing’s lines and colours. Turning off these ‘master’ genes disrupts the canvas, dulling the colours or turning the insects monochromatic.

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