Hot Topics: Clinical Ethics

Blog Posts (65)

January 18, 2016

Can Health Care Providers Love Their Patients?

by J.S. Blumenthal-Barby

Ms. Clara [name changed] is one of our patient partners on a PCORI funded project. PCORI is unique in that they aim to include patients and other stakeholders in all stages of research—from conceptualization of projects and their aims to the dissemination of results.…

January 13, 2016

Professional Judgment and Justice: Equal Respect for the Professional Judgment of Critical-Care Physicians

by David Magnus, PhD and Norm Rizk, MD

This issue’s target article by Kirby (2016) raises an incredibly important and challenging set of issues: Whether, when, and how should limits be placed on patient access to intensive medical care?…

November 19, 2015

Is There An Ethics Consultant In The House? Striving For Verisimilitude In Chicago Med

by Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD and Nanette Elster, JD, MPH

The new NBC medical drama Chicago Med premiered this week. A spin off of other established NBC dramas (Chicago Fire and Chicago PD), Chicago Med focuses on the working lives of health care professionals in a busy emergency department in the city of Chicago.…

October 28, 2015

Can a 5-year-old refuse treatment: The Case of Julianna Snow

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Julianna Snow is a 5-year-old who suffers from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a neurodegenerative illness. This is the most common of all inherited neurological disorders (about 1 in 2,500 people have it).…

October 9, 2015

Deeply Superficial

<p style="padding-left: 60px;"><span><span><span class="UFICommentBody"><span>“People need to be made more aware of the need to work at learning how to live because life is so quick and sometimes it goes away too quickly.” – Andy Warhol</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span class="UFICommentBody"><span>This past weekend was the last one for The Late Drawings of Andy Warhol: 1973-1987 exhibit at <a href="http://www.hydecollection.org/">The Hyde Collection Museum in Glen Falls</a>, and I almost didn’t go to it. I told myself there were far too many other things to do: the stack of recent journal articles I’ve been meaning to get to; student assignments that are in need of grading; the upcoming presentations for which I haven’t even begun putting together powerpoints; the apartment that, despite ongoing efforts, never seems to be completely clean; the piles of unwashed or unfolded laundry; and so on. In terms of triaging my limited time, a two-hour round trip trek to see a handful of sketches hardly seemed sufficiently important.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.04px;"><strong>The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a</strong> </span><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.04px;">Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="http://www.amc.edu/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>
August 24, 2015

"One Shoe Can Change Your Life"*

by Jeanie Sauerland, BS, BSN, RN

I hate shopping for shoes – always have. Footwear was not the reason I chose nursing – but it sure made it nice, to be able to wear comfortable walking shoes without looking like you wore orthopedic shoes made for someone 90 years old.…

July 7, 2015

Clinical Ethics Consultant Professionalization: A Response to Dr. Shelton

<p><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 22.3999996185303px;">In his <a href="/BioethicsBlog/post.cfm/does-the-work-clinical-ethics-consultation-lend-itself-to-professionalization">last AMBI blog</a> </span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 22.3999996185303px;">posted on June 18, 2015, Wayne N. Shelton, PhD, MSW, discussed recent movement toward the professionalization of clinical ethics consultants. He noted the adoption of a Code of Ethics for Health Care Ethics Consultants by the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH), which has been praised as important milestone toward the professionalization of clinical ethics consultants. Moreover, Dr. Shelton listed several challenges that “professionals” who call themselves “clinical ethics consultants” currently face, including: “[1] </span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 22.3999996185303px; color: #273049;">how to make sense of the diverse educational backgrounds and training of those who perform clinical ethics consultations and how far to push such requirements; [2] the lack of a national body to set requirements that leaves local hospital leaders with little incentive to pay for highly qualified CECs and view this as a sound investment; and finally [3], most seriously, the way in which many problems in patient care are misidentified as clinical ethical problems while other serious clinical ethical problems may be entirely overlooked or if recognized, not viewed as requiring the expertise of a CEC.” He concluded his post with: “These challenges are indications that clinical ethics consultation will not likely achieve professional status in the healthcare system in the near future.” Of course, Dr. Shelton is correct in his analysis, but some might see the challenges he listed as surmountable if those who practiced clinical ethics consultation were to: (1) establish minimum uniform educational standards for new clinical ethics consultants; (2) create national certification and accreditation standards so employers would more fully understand the nature and value of their work; and (3) provide consultants themselves and other stakeholders unmistakable guidance on what clearly constitutes the work of clinical ethics consultants. (This third point sounds very much like a “scope of practice” definition found in state professional licensing statutes.) However, it may take something much more for clinical ethics consultants to be a separate professional category.</span></p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="http://www.amc.edu/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>
June 17, 2015

Does Clinical Ethics Consultation Lend Itself to Professionalization?

<p style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Let me say emphatically at the outset of this blog, as someone who has been a clinical ethics consultant for over 20 years, I am quite sure that clinical ethics consultations overall improve the quality of patient care and currently are an important, even essential, part of the providing excellent patient care in hospitals. Contemporary medicine is filled with value laden questions and issues that often can be effectively addressed by someone with expertise and training in clinical ethics. Having said this, I am still somewhat skeptical about clinical ethics consultation becoming a professional area of healthcare that parallels other professional areas like medicine, nursing, and social work. I think there are some special considerations about the field of clinical ethics consultation that makes its future status as a professional activity uncertain.</span></p> <p style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">First of all it is well-known that CEC’s come from a variety of backgrounds and training—from philosophers to physicians to social workers to nurses and lawyers and on and on. People enter the field of clinical ethics consultations from very different disciplinary backgrounds and seemingly learn a common vocabulary and methodology of clinical ethics and a basic familiarity with and ability to function in the clinical setting. They learn this vocabulary in very different ways—some informally, some through short 1-2 week long intensives, some with certificate programs, some with master’s degrees, and some with 1-2 year long fellowships. No other area of healthcare work admits of such diversity. Though this is a positive feature in some ways by providing diverse perspectives in understanding value dilemmas, it creates a challenge of considerable controversy when we try to define the kind of educational training a future CEC should have. At the moment there seem to be many pathways into the field and no clear answer has emerged.</p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 19.0400009155273px; font-size: 12px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>
June 8, 2015

Actions vs. Words: What counts most in understanding patient preferences?

<p class="MsoNormal" style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Clinicians striving to help patients achieve healthcare goals often encounter the perplexing dichotomy of the patient’s stated goals and preferences and actions to the contrary. Some of these challenges can be overcome with education and close follow up to help reinforce adherence to medical recommendations, but other times, these barriers are more enigmatic.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Take for example, a patient who requires hemodialysis to sustain life. She sometimes shows up for her outpatient dialysis, but more often does not show up and is admitted to the hospital for emergent dialysis several months in a row. In consultation with her providers she is adamant that she does not want to die, and knows that she needs the dialysis to remain alive. She is discharged, and the pattern continues. Liberal scheduling with the outpatient service, transportation, reminders are all offered. Psychological tests and support are provided, and yet, her action pattern of not adhering to the treatment plan continues. Again, she is advised it is acceptable to halt and she will be offered palliative care. She refuses, and says she wants to live and will sit for dialysis. What is her genuine preference? Should we honor these statements, or accept her actions as the more authentic expression of her wishes? Though this hypothetical example is quite familiar to renal care providers, the dynamic spans many scenarios leaving many practitioners with a dilemma about the practical limits of honoring verbalized wishes that are not supported by congruent actions.</span></p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>
May 29, 2015

“Should I feel badly that I acted unethically?”

Ms. Barnard is a business woman who has opened a medical clinic across the street from an existing facility. She suspects that the Other Clinic is “playing unfairly” by not having a physician on site.…