Hot Topics: Ethics

Blog Posts (76)

December 12, 2018

Is Your Boss Discriminating Against You Because You Smoke?

Obamacare gave employers permission to charge smokers up to 50% more for health insurance, as a way to incentivize healthier behavior. But to make sure smokers had a fair chance to avoid these penalties, the law required employers to provide tobacco cessation … Continue reading

The post Is Your Boss Discriminating Against You Because You Smoke? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

November 27, 2018

Open Letter to Trump, Whitaker and Nielsen: Give safe passage to legal asylum seekers

“A group of ethicists, public health and health policy experts, healthcare providers, and lawyers has composed an open letter to President Donald J.
October 30, 2018

A Jewish Bioethicist Responds to Hate

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

 “Whoever kills a person [unjustly]…it is as though he has killed all mankind. And whoever saves a life, it is as though he had saved all mankind.” (Qur’an, 5:32)

When I was about 7 years old, my father was completing the newspaper crossword when he called me over to sit in his lap.…

October 22, 2018

Fordham’s Fr. Thomas Massaro Discusses Ethics & Immigration

  STUDENT VOICES By Randy Mehan When it comes to immigration, everyone has an opinion. But how do ethics factor in? This is what Fr. Thomas Massaro, S.J. addressed during a talk entitled “How Catholic Teaching on Migrants and Refugees Provides Guidance on the Wayward Policies of the U.S.” at the Fordham University Rose Hill […]
October 5, 2018

Ethics and Society Newsfeed – October 5, 2018

Politics Everything on Brett Kavanaugh and the F.B.I. Investigation “Around 2:30 a.m., the White House said in a statement it had received the F.B.I.’s investigation, which was “being transmitted to the Senate” as well. The statement expressed confidence the completed inquiry would not stand in the way of Judge Kavanaugh’s confirmation. On Wednesday, Senator Mitch […]
September 21, 2018

When Morality Isn’t So Moral: Price Gouging in Big Pharma

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“I think it is a moral requirement to make money when you can…to sell the product for the highest price” Nirmal Mulyeto the Financial Times

I have been haunted by the above quote, first reported in the Financial Times on September 11.…

September 7, 2018

Ethics and Society Newsfeed – September 7, 2018

Politics I Am Part of the Resistance Inside the Trump Administration “The root of the problem is the president’s amorality. Anyone who works with him knows he is not moored to any discernible first principles that guide his decision making.” Anonymous White House Writer Isn’t A Patriot. They’re Betraying The Constitution. “I can appreciate the […]
September 6, 2018

Ethical Perspectives on Advance Directives for Dementia

Four articles in the Hastings Center Report make an array of claims about  whether advance directives should or should not be used to instruct caregivers to withhold oral feeding of a person who reaches a designated stage of  dementia. I would like to advance some central ethical observations on the matter. A life can be… Read more

The post Ethical Perspectives on Advance Directives for Dementia appeared first on The Hastings Center.

August 31, 2018

On Protecting the Agency of Undocumented Immigrants from Patterns of Our Past

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN ETHICS PRIZE HONORABLE MENTION By Elizabeth Doty In the history of the United States rhetoric alienating immigrants, documented and undocumented, has consistently pervaded everyday life across the nation, from the front page of The New York Times to college campuses to airports to Congressional hearings to, indeed, even research. While I […]
August 24, 2018

Ethics and Society Newsfeed – August 24, 2018

Bioethics/Medical Ethics Jahi McMath, Teen At Center Of Medical And Religious Debate On Brain Death, Has Died Jahi McMath, a brain-dead patient who had been on life support since 2013, died on June 22, 2018 because of liver failure. McMath’s situation sparked a debate over whether brain-dead patients are considered physically dead. Though McMath is […]

View More Blog Entries

Published Articles (36)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 11 - Nov 2018

One Health, Bioethics, and Nonhuman Ethics Simon Coghlan & Benjamin Coghlan

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 9 Issue 3 - Nov 2018

“I didn’t have anything to decide, I wanted to help my kids”—An interview-based study of consent procedures for sampling human biological material for genetic research in rural Pakistan Nana Cecilie Halmsted Kongsholm, Jesper Lassen & Peter Sandøe

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 7 - Jul 2018

“A Little ELF, Please?” The Electronic Long-Form COI Disclosure Statement (ELFCOI) Lisa Kearns & Arthur Caplan

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

Performance-Enhancing Drugs, Sport, and the Ideal of Natural Athletic Performance Sigmund Loland

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 9 Issue 2 - Jun 2018

Undisclosed conflicts of interest among biomedical textbook authors Brian J. Piper, Drew A. Lambert, Ryan C. Keefe, Phoebe U. Smukler, Nicolas A. Selemon & Zachary R. Duperry

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 5 - May 2018

Why Bioethics Should Be Concerned With Medically Unexplained Symptoms Diane O'Leary

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 5 - May 2018

From Frankenstein to Hawking: Which is the Real Face of Science? Jonathan D. Moreno

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 5 - May 2018

Peering into the Future of Peer Review Kayhan Parsi & Nanette Elster

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 9 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

The Impact of a Landmark Neuroscience Study on Free Will: A Qualitative Analysis of Articles Using Libet and Colleagues' Methods Victoria Saigle, Veljko Dubljević & Eric Racine

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 9 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

Temporal Naturalism, Free Will, and the Cartesian Myth: Time Is NOT Illusory and We Are NOT ‘Talking Heads’ Gary Goldberg

View More Articles

News (122)

December 14, 2018 11:43 am

Gene editing: who should decide? (Nature)

Last month’s announcement claiming the birth of the world’s first genome-edited babies has sparked a furore over how to regulate this cutting-edge technology (see Nature 563, 607–608; 2018, and Nature564, 5; 2018). In our view, piling up scientist-led conferences modelled on Asilomar in 1975 (see Nature 526, 293–294; 2015) without any clear consensus is futile.

December 11, 2018 9:15 am

What These Medical Journals Don’t Reveal: Top Doctors’ Ties to Industry (The New York Times)

The Sarah Cannon Research Institute, based in Nashville, received nearly $8 million in payments from drug companies on behalf of its president for clinical operations, Dr. Howard Burris, largely for research work. Dozens of his articles published in prestigious medical journals did not include the required disclosures of those payments and relationships.

December 11, 2018 9:15 am

The CRISPR Baby Scandal Gets Worse by the Day (The Atlantic)

Before last week, few people had heard the name He Jiankui. But on November 25, the young Chinese researcher became the center of a global firestorm when it emerged that he had allegedly made the first crispr-edited babies, twin girls named Lulu and Nana. Antonio Regalado broke the story for MIT Technology Review, and He himself described the experiment at an international gene-editing summit in Hong Kong. After his talk, He revealed that another early pregnancy is under way.

It is still unclear if He did what he claims to have done. Nonetheless, the reaction was swift and negative. The crispr pioneer Jennifer Doudna says she was “horrified,” NIH Director Francis Collins said the experiment was “profoundly disturbing,” and even Julian Savulescu, an ethicist who has described gene-editing research as “a moral necessity,” described He’s work as “monstrous.”

December 9, 2018 12:47 pm

Why Are Scientists So Upset About the First Crispr Babies? (The New York Times)

A Chinese scientist recently claimed he had produced the world’s first gene-edited babies, setting off a global firestorm. If true — the scientist has not yet published data that would confirm it — his actions would be a sensational breach of international scientific conventions. Although gene editing holds promise to potentially correct dangerous disease-causing mutations and treat some medical conditions, there are many safety and ethical concerns about editing human embryos.

Here are answers to some of the numerous questions swirling around this development.

December 8, 2018 10:15 am

Microsoft calls for laws to prevent facial recognition AI from hurting consumers (The LA Times)

Microsoft Corp. called for new legislation to govern artificial intelligence software for recognizing faces, advocating for human review and oversight of the technology in crucial cases.

“This includes where decisions may create a risk of bodily or emotional harm to a consumer, where there may be implications on human or fundamental rights, or where a consumer’s personal freedom or privacy may be impinged,” Microsoft’s president and chief legal officer, Brad Smith, wrote in a blog post published Thursday in conjunction with a speech on the topic at the Brookings Institution think tank.

December 7, 2018 9:15 am

Policy Recommendations: Control and Responsible Innovation of Artificial Intelligence (The Hastings Center)

A major international project at The Hastings Center released policy recommendations for the development of artificial intelligence and robotics to help reap the benefits and productivity gains and minimize the risks and undesirable social consequences.

“Research, innovation, and the deployment of AI and robotic systems are proceeding rapidly, and so, too, is the emergence of a transdisciplinary community of researchers in AI and the social sciences dedicated to AI safety and ethics,” states the executive summary to the final report. “The Hastings AI workshops played a seminal role in catalyzing the emergence of this worldwide network of organizations and individuals.” The Hastings Center’s project, Control and Responsible Innovation in the Development of AI and Robotics, was funded by the Future of Life Institute and led by Wendell Wallach, a senior advisor at The Hastings Center and a scholar at Yale University’s Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics. Wallach is an internationally recognized expert on the ethical and governance concerns posed by emerging technologies, particularly artificial intelligence and neuroscience. Project participants included Stuart Russell, of the University of California, Berkeley; Bart Selman, of Cornell University; Francesca Rossi, of IBM; and David Roscoe, a Hastings Center advisory council member.

December 6, 2018 4:15 pm

Should We Edit the Human Germline? Is Consensus Possible or Even Desirable? (The Hastings Center)

On the one hand, reports of a rogue scientist, He Jiankui, who contravened the scientific and ethical norms that should guide the development of human genome editing reinforces the need for clarity about those norms and international monitoring of advances in the field. On the other hand, it shows the weaknesses and limitations of voluntary efforts – like the summit – to guide scientists’ practices. They lack any real enforcement power on their own, and have largely served to ensure that human genome editing research can continue, rather than promote reflection on whether we should edit the human germline in the first place.

December 6, 2018 9:00 am

If you’re single with cancer, you may get less aggressive treatment than a married person (The Washington Post)

If you are divorced, widowed or never married and develop cancer, watch out. You may get less aggressive treatment than your married friends.

We’ve often heard about studies showing that married adults are more likely to survive cancer than singles. But buried in those same studies is another finding that hasn’t made the headlines. When surgery or radiotherapy is the treatment of choice, patients with spouses are more likely to get it.

December 5, 2018 9:15 am

Genetically Modified People Are Walking Among Us (The New York Times)

It felt as if humanity had crossed an important line: In China, a scientist named He Jiankui announced on Monday that twins had been born in November with a gene that he had edited when they were embryos.

But in some ways this news is not new at all. A few genetically modified people already walk among us.

December 3, 2018 2:12 pm

Medical Detectives: The Last Hope for Families Coping With Rare Diseases (KQED Science)

All over the country, specialized strike teams of doctors are giving hope to families who are desperately searching for a diagnosis.

The medical sleuths have cracked more than a third of the 382 patient cases they’re pursuing, according to a recent paper in the New England Journal of Medicine.

View More News Items