Hot Topics: Ethics

Blog Posts (49)

December 8, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: December 8, 2017

Technology Ethics Artificial Intelligence Seeks An Ethical Conscience “Leading artificial intelligence researchers gathered this week for the prestigious Neural Information Processing Systems conference have a new topic on their agenda. Alongside the usual cutting-edge research, panel discussions, and socializing: concern about AI’s power. Four ethical priorities for neurotechnologies and AI “Artificial intelligence and brain–computer interfaces must … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: December 8, 2017
November 14, 2017

Fordham University Ethics & Society Master’s Student Working to Eradicate Poverty

On October 17th, 2017, Omar Lebron, a graduate student of Fordham University’s Master of Arts in Ethics and Society program, moderated the event “Answering the Call of October 17 to end poverty: A path toward peaceful and inclusive societies” at the United Nations in New York to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the International Day for … More Fordham University Ethics & Society Master’s Student Working to Eradicate Poverty
November 4, 2017

BioethicsTV (October 29-November 3): Decision-makers, Boundary Issues; Errors; and Double Effect

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Good Doctor (Season 1; Episode 6): Who Chooses; Experimental Treatment; Boundary Crossing; Hiding Errors

A bus crash carrying a wedding party leads to a mass casualty incident.…

October 27, 2017

BioethicsTV (October 16-27, 2017): Maternal-Fetal Conflict, Trolley Car Dilemma & Lying

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Good Doctor (Season 1; Episode 4): Maternal-Fetal Conflict

Although the focus of this show is supposedly the neuro-different resident, what it does very well is pose and debate ethical issues.…

October 24, 2017

Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher Weighs in on Researchers Using Real Guns in Study with Children in Mic

In a recent study, researchers asked children ages 8 – 12 years old to watch 20-minute clips of PG-rated movies that either included or did not include gun violence. The objective of the study was to test whether children exposed to gun violence in movie clips would 1) handle a real gun longer and 2) … More Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher Weighs in on Researchers Using Real Guns in Study with Children in Mic
October 20, 2017

ASBH Lifetime Achievement Award 2017-Myra Christopher

bioethics.net is proud to present this live release of the talks given by the 2017 ASBH Lifetime Achievement Award honorees. If you are at the ASBH Meeting, you can read along; if you were unable to attend, then you can see their talks here.

October 13, 2017

BioethicsTV (October 9-13, 2017): Drinking on transplant list; big pharma in pandemics; mortality forces morality

The Good Doctor (Season 1; Episode 3): A Patient Takes A Drink While on the Transplant List

This week, a patient is finally at the top of the list for a heart transplant.…

October 13, 2017

Hospice and Palliative Care

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE THIRD-PLACE WINNER By Maia Lauria I first stumbled upon the issue of palliative care during a particularly hard time in my life. I was twenty years old, and for the first time having to confront the realities of watching a loved one die. Up until then, death had been a … More Hospice and Palliative Care
October 6, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: October 6, 2017

B0ioethics/Medical Ethics Pope denounces technologies that help people change gender “Pope Francis denounce Thursday how new technologies are making it easier for people to change their genders, saying this ‘utopia of the neutral’ jeopardizes the creation of new life.” KAST calls for loosening up of law on bioethics“ The Korean Academy of Science and Technology … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: October 6, 2017
October 3, 2017

Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher Discusses What the Revised Common Rule Means for Informed Consent in Medical Ethics Advisor

The Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, or the Common Rule was revised earlier this year and is set to be effective on January 19th, 2018. The Common Rule was created in 1991 to “better protect human subjects involved in research, while facilitating valuable research and reducing burden, delay, and ambiguity for investigators.” … More Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher Discusses What the Revised Common Rule Means for Informed Consent in Medical Ethics Advisor

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Published Articles (20)

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Oct 2017

Is That the Same Person? Case Studies in Neurosurgery Nancy S. Jecker & Andrew L. Ko

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Oct 2017

The Problems With Fixating on Consciousness in Disorders of Consciousness David Fischer & Robert D. Truog

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

Saving Life, Limb, and Eyesight: Assessing the Medical Rules of Eligibility During Armed Conflict Michael L. Gross

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Jun 2017

What Neuroscience and Neurophilosophy Can Tell Us About the Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on the Self Georg Northoff

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2017

Ethical and Legal Concerns Associated With the Comprehension of Legal Language and Concepts Joseph Wszalek

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2017

Ethics, Ethicists, and Professional Organizations in the Neurological Sciences Tabitha Moses & Judy Illes

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2017

tDCS Research in a World With FDA Regulation Patricia J. Zettler

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

A Bridge Back to the Future: Public Health Ethics, Bioethics, and Environmental Ethics Lisa M. Lee

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 6 - Jun 2017

When Respecting Autonomy Is Harmful: A Clinically Useful Approach to the Nocebo Effect John T. Fortunato, Jason Adam Wasserman & Daniel Londyn Menkes

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

Healthy individuals' perspectives on clinical research protocols and influences on enrollment decisions Laura Weiss Roberts & Jane Paik Kim

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News (58)

November 7, 2017 9:00 am

How Should Organizations Promote Equitable Distribution of Benefits from Technological Innovation in Health Care? (AMA Journal of Ethics)

Technological innovations typically benefit those who have good access to and an understanding of the underlying technologies. As such, technology-centered health care innovations are likely to preferentially benefit users of privileged socioeconomic backgrounds. Which policies and strategies should health care organizations adopt to promote equitable distribution of the benefits from technological innovations?

October 31, 2017 9:00 am

A healthier Halloween for kids, without cutting out candy? Yes, really. (Washington Post)

There is plenty of debate about whether parents should limit their kids’ access to Halloween activities and candy, in the name of fending off a lifetime of sugar cravings, or let them eat their fill. With childhood obesity on the rise and many parents eager to limit added sugars in their children’s diet, which approach is best for helping kids learn healthy eating habits?

October 30, 2017 9:00 am

Special Report: U.S. company makes a fortune selling bodies donated to science (Reuters)

McDonald’s and Kroc got rich selling hamburgers. Science Care and Rogers have made millions from human body parts. From 2012 through 2014, Rogers and his co-owner, wife Josie, parlayed the donated dead into at least $12.5 million in earnings, according to Internal Revenue Service audits and court documents reviewed by Reuters.

October 10, 2017 9:00 am

Knowingly infecting others with HIV is no longer a felony in California. Advocates say it targeted sex workers. (Washington Post)

California lawmakers have passed legislation to reduce the penalty for those who knowingly or intentionally expose others to HIV without their knowledge, rolling back a law that mostly affected sex workers. The bill, SB 239, which was approved by the Democrat-controlled state legislature in September and signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown on Friday, will lower the charges for these acts from a felony to a misdemeanor when the law goes into effect in 2018.

October 3, 2017 10:00 am

Teenage suicide is extremely difficult to predict. That’s why some experts are turning to machines for help. (Washington Post)

Researchers from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center are testing an app in schools that analyzes language to determine whether teens are at risk for suicide.

September 14, 2017 9:00 am

Senate panel seeks middle ground on human fetal tissue research and abortion (Science)

The Senate Appropriations Committee, in a bill that boosts NIH funding by $2 billion, to $36.1 billion, ordered the biomedical research agency to launch a pilot study to determine whether banking tissue from stillbirths and spontaneous abortions, or miscarriages, could serve all of the needs of biomedical researchers.

September 7, 2017 9:00 am

Massive Ebola data site planned to combat outbreaks (Nature)

More than 11,000 people died when Ebola tore through West Africa between 2014 and 2016, and yet clinicians still lack data that would enable them to reliably identify the disease when a person first walks into a clinic. To fill that gap and others before the next outbreak hits, researchers are developing a platform to organize and share Ebola data that have so far been scattered beyond reach.

August 25, 2017 9:00 am

Teen drug overdose death rate climbed 19% in one year (CNN)

The rate of teen drug overdose deaths in the United States climbed 19% from 2014 to 2015, from 3.1 deaths per 100,000 teens to 3.7 per 100,000, according to data released this week. The new numbers involve teens ages 15 to 19 and were released by the National Center for Health Statistics.

August 22, 2017 9:00 am

China’s embrace of embryo selection raises thorny questions (Nature)

Early experiments are beginning to show how genome-editing technologies such as CRISPR might one day fix disease-causing mutations before embryos are implanted. But refining the techniques and getting regulatory approval will take years. PGD has already helped thousands of couples. And whereas the expansion of PGD around the world has generally been slow, in China, it is starting to explode.

July 28, 2017 9:00 am

First U.S. team to gene-edit human embryos revealed (Science)

Since Chinese researchers announced the first gene editing of a human embryo 2 years ago, many expected that similar work in the United States was inevitable. Last night, the MIT Technology Review broke the news that such experiments have happened. The research, led by embryologist Shoukhrat Mitalipov of Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, also reportedly sidestepped problems of incomplete and off-target editing that plagued previous attempts, though details could not be confirmed since the work is not yet published and Mitalipov has so far declined to comment.

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