Hot Topics: Ethics

Blog Posts (36)

August 18, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: August 18, 2017

Politics Neil Gorsuch Speech at Trump Hotel Raises Ethical Questions “Justice Neil M. Gorsuch, President Trump’s Supreme Court appointee, is scheduled to address a conservative group at the Trump International Hotel in Washington next month, less than two weeks before the court is set to hear arguments on Mr. Trump’s travel ban.” Trump’s Washington DC hotel … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: August 18, 2017
August 9, 2017

Right to Try: Why Logic and Facts Won’t Win This One

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week the U.S. Senate passed bill S. 204, the Trickett Wendler Right to Try Act of 2017.…

July 27, 2017

Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher on Reversal of the Goldwater Rule

The American Psychoanalytic Association announced earlier this month that members of the association no longer need to abide by the long-established “Goldwater Rule” named after 1964 presidential candidate Barry Goldwater. The rule, which can be found in Section 7.3 of the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Ethics Code, cautions against most psychiatrists and other mental health professionals offering … More Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher on Reversal of the Goldwater Rule
June 2, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: June 2, 2017

Politics and World News White House Waivers May Have Violated Ethics Rules White House waiver allows all White House aids to communicate with news organizations, even if they involve a “former employer or former client.” Stephen K. Bannon, senior White House strategist, will be able to communicate with editors at Breitbart News. A Vocal Defender of … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: June 2, 2017
May 11, 2017

It’s Not Science Fiction: Ethics of Artificial Wombs

With the advent of 3-D printers and similar technology, modern science has come closer and closer to artificially solving medical issues and imitating parts of both the anatomy and physiology of the human body. However, when it comes to issues of reproduction and pregnancy, it’s an entirely different battle. Attempts to create an artificial womb for human … More It’s Not Science Fiction: Ethics of Artificial Wombs
May 2, 2017

Incidental White Privilege

STUDENT VOICES By Jade Reyes Not every issue of morality that we are faced with is easily discernible— with an easily ascertainable correct action. Many of these issues are nuanced and multifaceted, affecting every person differently and involves a weighing process between imperfect alternatives. One of those issues is race or ethnicity and furthermore the … More Incidental White Privilege
April 17, 2017

A Bioethics View of Executions in Arkansas

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

This week the state of Arkansas had planned to execute 8 death-row inmates in 4, back-to-back killings using lethal injection over 10 days.…

April 6, 2017

Projection NOT Promotion: Why the Violence of Sports is Ethical in Society

STUDENT VOICES By Maria Trivelpiece It is quite difficult to get through a day without hearing or seeing some mention of sports or athletics in our world. They practically dominate society. Professional athletes are some of the highest paid people on the planet. They are the epitome of what children aspire to be, fans fawn over … More Projection NOT Promotion: Why the Violence of Sports is Ethical in Society
April 6, 2017

Projection NOT Promotion: Why the Violence of Sports is Ethical in Society

STUDENT VOICES By Maria Trivelpiece It is quite difficult to get through a day without hearing or seeing some mention of sports or athletics in our world. They practically dominate society. Professional athletes are some of the highest paid people on the planet. They are the epitome of what children aspire to be, fans fawn over … More Projection NOT Promotion: Why the Violence of Sports is Ethical in Society
March 17, 2017

Ethics of the Trump Budget: The Social Contract is Dead

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

President Trump released his blueprint for a 2018 federal budget. From an ethical standpoint, the President seems to operates from a Hobbesian standpoint—life is nasty, brutish and short.…

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Published Articles (12)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 6 - Jun 2017

When Respecting Autonomy Is Harmful: A Clinically Useful Approach to the Nocebo Effect John T. Fortunato, Jason Adam Wasserman & Daniel Londyn Menkes

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

Healthy individuals' perspectives on clinical research protocols and influences on enrollment decisions Laura Weiss Roberts & Jane Paik Kim

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 5 - May 2017

Ethics, Refugees, and the President's Executive Order Nancy E. Kass

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Catholic Social Teaching and the Duty to Vaccinate Paul J. Carson & Anthony T. Flood

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Psychiatric Genomics and Mental Health Treatment: Setting the Ethical Agenda Camillia Kong, Michael Dunn & Michael Parker

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Psychiatric Genetics in a Risk Society Nicole Martinez-Martin

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 3 - Mar 2017

The Precautionary Principle and the Tolerability of Blood Transfusion Risks Koen Kramer, Hans L. Zaaijer & Marcel F. Verweij

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 3 - Mar 2017

Using Social Media as a Research Recruitment Tool: Ethical Issues and Recommendations Luke Gelinas, Robin Pierce, Sabune Winkler, I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch & Barbara E. Bierer

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

Problematic protocols: An overview of medical research protocols not approved by the LUMC medical ethics review committee Derek Gideon Tersmette & Dirk Peter Engberts

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

Online public reactions to fMRI communication with patients with disorders of consciousness: Quality of life, end-of-life decision making, and concerns with misdiagnosis Jennifer A. Chandler, Jeffrey A. Sun & Eric Racine

News (49)

July 28, 2017 9:00 am

First U.S. team to gene-edit human embryos revealed (Science)

Since Chinese researchers announced the first gene editing of a human embryo 2 years ago, many expected that similar work in the United States was inevitable. Last night, the MIT Technology Review broke the news that such experiments have happened. The research, led by embryologist Shoukhrat Mitalipov of Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, also reportedly sidestepped problems of incomplete and off-target editing that plagued previous attempts, though details could not be confirmed since the work is not yet published and Mitalipov has so far declined to comment.

July 18, 2017 9:00 am

Two female scientists sue Salk Institute, alleging discrimination at ‘old boys club’ (Science)

Two senior female scientists are suing their employer, the prestigious Salk Institute for Biological Studies, alleging pervasive, long-standing gender discrimination. The independent institute, in San Diego, California, was founded by polio vaccine pioneer Jonas Salk 57 years ago.

July 10, 2017 9:00 am

How Canadian researchers reconstituted an extinct poxvirus for $100,000 using mail-order DNA (Science)

A group led by virologist David Evans of the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, says it has synthesized the horsepox virus, a relative of smallpox, from genetic pieces ordered in the mail. Horsepox is not known to harm humans—and like smallpox, researchers believe it no longer exists in nature; nor is it seen as a major agricultural threat. But the technique Evans used could be used to recreate smallpox, a horrific disease that was declared eradicated in 1980.

July 5, 2017 9:00 am

Living to 125 and beyond: Scientists dispute there's a limit to our lifespans (CNN)

Don’t mess with our collective dreams of immortality. A flurry of new research vigorously opposes a study from last year that dared to suggest there might be a ceiling to the human lifespan.

June 28, 2017 9:00 am

WHO guidelines on ethical issues in public health surveillance (WHO)

The WHO Guidelines on Ethical Issues in Public Health Surveillance is the first international framework of its kind, it fills an important gap. The goal of the guideline development project was to help policymakers and practitioners navigate the ethical issues presented by public health surveillance. This document outlines 17 ethical guidelines that can assist everyone involved in public health surveillance, including officials in government agencies, health workers, NGOs and the private sector.

June 20, 2017 10:58 am

Trump ‘simply does not care’ about HIV/AIDS, say 6 experts who just quit his advisory council (Washington Post)

The first hints of an uncertain future for the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS came last year, when Donald Trump’s presidential campaign refused to meet with advocates for people living with HIV, said Scott Schoettes, a member of the council since 2014. That unease was magnified on Inauguration Day in January, when an official White House website for the Office of National AIDS Policy vanished, Schoettes said. Last week, he and five others announced they were quitting the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS, also known as PACHA.

June 15, 2017 9:00 am

A fetus needs to defend itself against foreign bodies—so how does it avoid attacking its mother? (Science)

The immune system of a fetus developing in the womb faces a quandary: It has to prepare itself to attack dangerous pathogens after birth, by distinguishing its own cells from those of invaders. But until that time, it needs to avoid attacking the mother, whose cells are also “foreign.” A new study of fetal tissue has revealed one way the developing immune system keeps itself in check: by interrupting the production of a key weapon in the body’s arsenal against invaders.

May 31, 2017 9:00 am

Colombian biologist cleared of criminal charges for posting another scientist’s thesis online (Nature)

A Colombian biologist who faced a criminal trial for posting another scientist’s thesis online has been cleared of copyright violation — an offence that, under Colombian law, might have brought him a jail sentence.

May 5, 2017 9:00 am

Artificial intelligence prevails at predicting Supreme Court decisions (Science)

“See you in the Supreme Court!” President Donald Trump tweeted last week, responding to lower court holds on his national security policies. But is taking cases all the way to the highest court in the land a good idea? Artificial intelligence may soon have the answer. A new study shows that computers can do a better job than legal scholars at predicting Supreme Court decisions, even with less information.

March 22, 2017 9:00 am

Monsanto Weed Killer Roundup Faces New Doubts on Safety in Unsealed Documents (New York Times)

The reputation of Roundup, whose active ingredient is the world’s most widely used weed killer, took a hit on Tuesday when a federal court unsealed documents raising questions about its safety and the research practices of its manufacturer, the chemical giant Monsanto.

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