Hot Topics: Global Ethics

Blog Posts (7)

October 12, 2017

Justice and Bioethics: Who Should Finance Academic Publishing?

by Udo Schuklenk (Joint Editor in Chief) & David Magnus (Editor in Chief)
We applaud Chattopadhyay, Muyser, Moxham & DeVries on their article, “A Question of Social Justice: How Policies of Profit Negate Engagement of Developing World Bioethicsts and Undermine Bioethicists” for tackling an important and often neglected topic in bioethics: the challenges that our under-resourced colleagues face in conducting research and contributing to the literature in bioethics.…

September 28, 2017

Social Justice Trumps Fancy Tech In This Week’s Bioethics News

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Some weeks when I think about what my blog will be about, there are very few relevant items in the news.…

August 22, 2017

Double Dutch euthanasia evokes sympathy through age and romance

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

O true apothecary!
Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.
– Romeo & Juliet, Act 5, Scene 3

In a scene reminiscent of Romeo and Juliet, a Dutch couple were voluntarily euthanized together after sharing their final kiss.…

March 29, 2017

I am a refugee, an immigrant and an American

Our Managing Editor, Bela Fishbeyn published a very moving account of her experiences as an immigrant to the United States. This highlights the schizophrenic nature of our nation’s attitudes and history towards immigrants and refugees.…

March 3, 2017

BioethicsTV: Communication Challenges

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Chicago Med (Season 2, Episode 15) focused on problems with communication These ranged from offered a guide to when not to work with the media, violating HIPAA, to talking to students about dangerous treatments.…

February 21, 2017

Ethics, refugees, and the President’s Executive Order

by Nancy Kass, ScD
There are different political philosophies about the responsibilities of states regarding whether to accept refugees. While there is a political philosophy that might be called Nationalist in perspective that says, essentially, “Not my Problem,” the predominant philosophy globally is different.…

December 14, 2016

The Ethics of Climate Change Activism: Fear vs. Reality

STUDENT VOICES By: Chelsea Zantay This essay is in response to the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs video clip “Global Ethics Forum: Ethics Matter: A Conversation with Bill McKibben.”   Often when a problem is too big or too scary we throw up our hands and announce that “there is nothing we can do” … More The Ethics of Climate Change Activism: Fear vs. Reality

Published Articles (6)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 11 - Nov 2017

The Rescinding of DACA: What Should Healthcare Professionals and Academics Do? (and Why?) Mark G. Kuczewski & Danish Zaidi

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

A Question of Social Justice: How Policies of Profit Negate Engagement of Developing World Bioethicists and Undermine Global Bioethics Subrata Chattopadhyay, Catherine Myser, Tiffany Moxham & Raymond De Vries

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

A Bridge Back to the Future: Public Health Ethics, Bioethics, and Environmental Ethics Lisa M. Lee

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

We Can and Must Rebuild the Bridges of Interdisciplinary Bioethics Darryl R. J. Macer

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 5 - May 2017

Ethics, Refugees, and the President's Executive Order Nancy E. Kass

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 10 - Oct 2016

Governance of Transnational Global Health Research Consortia and Health Equity Bridget Pratt & Adnan A. Hyder

News (42)

March 2, 2018 9:00 am

The least and most dangerous countries to be a newborn (CNN)

Every year around the world, about 2.6 million babies die within their first month of life — and some countries see more of those tragic deaths than others. A UNICEF report released Tuesday ranks countries by their newborn mortality rates in 2016.

January 4, 2018 9:00 am

Safety concerns derail dengue vaccination program (Science)

Efforts to control dengue suffered a major setback in late November when Sanofi Pasteur announced that its vaccine, the only one on the market, should only be given to those who have already had one infection with the mosquito-borne disease that affects millions of people in the tropics each year.

December 8, 2017 9:00 am

China to roll back regulations for traditional medicine despite safety concerns (Nature)

Scientists fear plans to abandon clinical trials of centuries-old remedies will put people at risk.

November 30, 2017 9:00 am

Sexual harassment: How it stands around the globe (CNN)

The fact is that sexual harassment is part and parcel of daily life, particularly in public places, Jewkes believes. “It’s used to curtail a woman’s freedom.”
In the streets of London, Mumbai, Washington or Lagos, the recent outpouring of stories from women using #MeToo and its many iterations has showed the uniformity of the problem — irrespective of country and culture.
November 1, 2017 9:00 am

Echoes of Ebola as plague hits Madagascar (Science)

Hundreds of epidemiologists and technical experts are pouring into Madagascar, one of the poorest countries in the world, to help fight an unprecedented plague epidemic. By 20 October, 1297 people had been infected and 102 had died, and cases are doubling weekly.

October 18, 2017 9:00 am

Polluted environments kill 1.7 million children each year, WHO says (CNN)

Each year, environmental pollutants cost an estimated 1.7 million lives among children under 5, according to World Health Organization reports released Monday.

October 16, 2017 9:00 am

Drug-resistant malaria advances in Mekong (Science)

Some malaria researchers say their worst fears are coming true. A malaria parasite resistant to resistant to a first-line artemisinin combination therapy has rapidly made its way in an arc from western Cambodia, through northeastern Thailand, to southern Laos; now, it has landed in southern Vietnam, where it is causing alarming rates of treatment failure.

October 6, 2017 9:00 am

Changes in the microbiota cause genetically modified Anopheles to spread in a population (Science)

In an alternative strategy, Wang et al.engineered mosquitoes’ gut bacteria. A strain of nonpathogenic bacteria, AS1, was both sexually and transgenerationally transmitted. The strain infected a laboratory population of mosquitoes and persisted for at least three generations. AS1 engineered to inhibit malaria parasite development in the midgut could do so without handicapping the mosquitoes.

September 6, 2017 9:00 am

United States to give Ethiopia $91 million in drought aid for food and medicine (Washington Post)

According to USAID spokesman Clayton McCleskey, Green told Desalegn he was concerned that conditions were deteriorating for people affected by the drought and encouraged the government to “show greater leadership and invest more resources to combat a worsening humanitarian crisis.”

September 1, 2017 9:00 am

Tanzania Gears Up To Become A Nation Of Medical Drones (NPR)

In early 2018, the nation will start using Zipline drones for on-demand delivery of blood, vaccines, medications and other supplies such as sutures and IV tubes.

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