Hot Topics: Health Care

Blog Posts (3354)

August 27, 2016

Law of Brain Death in Los Angeles,California

With the media attention on the latest developments in the Israel Stinson case, it might be worth refreshing on the basics of the law of brain death in California.   Here is a video of a 2015 Los Angeles conference where I explained the history a...
August 26, 2016

How to Stop Over-Eating — Lessons from Brain Science

Put our brains into the modern food environment, and you have a recipe for disaster. Our brains are hardwired to crave calorie-dense foods, this craving no doubt arising from our evolutionary time spent on the Tundra where calories were often … Continue reading

The post How to Stop Over-Eating — Lessons from Brain Science appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

August 26, 2016

Public discussions on human gene editing

On August 3, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine posted online the slides and talks from its July 12 meeting to discuss public implications of the Human Gene-Editing Initiative.  A total of four meetings plus a related workshop were held: an introductory discussion in December 2015, followed by three more substantial meetings plus the related workshop in February, April, and now July of... // Read More »
August 25, 2016

How technology has changed the definition of death (2 min video)

Vox has a nice, basic 2-minute video on the history of the determination of death.
August 25, 2016

More on the Male Pill: Social Reasons Why It Is Good for Women and Men

In my previous blog , I discussed how the lack of male contraception reduces men’s reproductive autonomy and burdens women with the health-related and financial consequences of being the one responsible for contraception. In this blog, I want to explore some of the social burdens women face when contracepting, especially those that men do not and would not face when using contraception.

Women face the social burdens of contraception, which include medicalization of one’s reproductive health, the stress and worry about the possibility of an unintended pregnancy, social repercussions of one’s contraceptive decisions, and possible moral reproach for contraceptive failures. While men could potentially face some of these social burdens, several of them are specific to women. For example, since pregnancy occurs in a woman’s body, she will physically embody the stigma and shame of an unintended pregnancy whereas the man will not carry any physical reminder of it.

Another burden unique to women is the double-bind they face regarding contraceptive use. Women who use contraceptive may be seen as violating the feminine norm of chastity. Yet, if single women do not use contraception, they risk an unintended pregnancy, which is associated with irresponsibility and trying to “trap” a man.

Since men are not held to the norm of chastity, but rather are frequently lauded for sexual promiscuity, they are not socially penalized for engaging in sexual activity and using contraception. Thus, the development of male contraceptives could help women avoid this no-win situation while empowering men to control their reproduction.

The need for male contraceptives is often looked overlooked because contraception is often conflated with women, thereby marginalizing and even ignoring men. For instance, unmet need for contraception is generally calculated using only women’s information: their fertility intentions and their contraceptive use. Excluding men from questions about unmet contraceptive needs fails to recognize their role in and responsibility for contraception both in their personal relationships and on the social level. It moreover fails to acknowledge that men may also have unmet contraceptive needs.

One study in Western Africa that interviewed both women and men regarding unmet contraceptive need found that between 15 – 23% of husbands had unmet contraceptive need even though their wives did not. These men were not interested in having children, at least at that time, but the dearth of reversible male contraceptives limited their options for controlling their reproduction since their partner did not have unmet contraceptive need and was consequently not using female or shared methods (and the male condom is frequently considered a shared method).

One of the benefits of female LARCs is that the woman’s partner does not need to be involved in or even know about their use. This is a good option for women if they and their partner disagree about contraceptive use. Unfortunately, men have no alternative available to them that they can use without their partner’s involvement or knowledge, which raises justice concerns and highlights men’s diminished reproductive autonomy.

 

 


 [LC1]Hyperlink to my previous blog.

August 25, 2016

More on the Male Pill: Social Reasons Why It Is Good for Women and Men

In my previous blog , I discussed how the lack of male contraception reduces men’s reproductive autonomy and burdens women with the health-related and financial consequences of being the one responsible for contraception. In this blog, I want to explore some of the social burdens women face when contracepting, especially those that men do not and would not face when using contraception.

Women face the social burdens of contraception, which include medicalization of one’s reproductive health, the stress and worry about the possibility of an unintended pregnancy, social repercussions of one’s contraceptive decisions, and possible moral reproach for contraceptive failures. While men could potentially face some of these social burdens, several of them are specific to women. For example, since pregnancy occurs in a woman’s body, she will physically embody the stigma and shame of an unintended pregnancy whereas the man will not carry any physical reminder of it.

Another burden unique to women is the double-bind they face regarding contraceptive use. Women who use contraceptive may be seen as violating the feminine norm of chastity. Yet, if single women do not use contraception, they risk an unintended pregnancy, which is associated with irresponsibility and trying to “trap” a man.

Since men are not held to the norm of chastity, but rather are frequently lauded for sexual promiscuity, they are not socially penalized for engaging in sexual activity and using contraception. Thus, the development of male contraceptives could help women avoid this no-win situation while empowering men to control their reproduction.

The need for male contraceptives is often looked overlooked because contraception is often conflated with women, thereby marginalizing and even ignoring men. For instance, unmet need for contraception is generally calculated using only women’s information: their fertility intentions and their contraceptive use. Excluding men from questions about unmet contraceptive needs fails to recognize their role in and responsibility for contraception both in their personal relationships and on the social level. It moreover fails to acknowledge that men may also have unmet contraceptive needs.

One study in Western Africa that interviewed both women and men regarding unmet contraceptive need found that between 15 – 23% of husbands had unmet contraceptive need even though their wives did not. These men were not interested in having children, at least at that time, but the dearth of reversible male contraceptives limited their options for controlling their reproduction since their partner did not have unmet contraceptive need and was consequently not using female or shared methods (and the male condom is frequently considered a shared method).

One of the benefits of female LARCs is that the woman’s partner does not need to be involved in or even know about their use. This is a good option for women if they and their partner disagree about contraceptive use. Unfortunately, men have no alternative available to them that they can use without their partner’s involvement or knowledge, which raises justice concerns and highlights men’s diminished reproductive autonomy.

 

 


 [LC1]Hyperlink to my previous blog.

August 24, 2016

The Tyranny of Corporatized Health Care: Time for Single-Payer

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In Illinois, Land of Lincoln insurance and Aetna announced that they are pulling out of the health insurance Marketplace.…

August 24, 2016

Jailing for Dollars: The Federal Government Takes Steps to Eliminate a Moral Stain on Justice in the US

The United States has become the world’s leading jailer with 2.2 million people in jails and prisons across the country.  With a combination of government and privately run facilities, the nation faces the moral issues surrounding the prison-industrial complex.  As … Continue reading
August 24, 2016

The Value of Reflection in Clinical Teaching

By Patricia Stubenberg “No words are ofterner on our lips than thinking and thought.”  – John Dewey The teaching physician has opportunities for personal and professional growth through reflection and revisiting not only their own experiences in training and practice, but also their role as clinical teachers with medical students and residents.  Studies on reflection in […]
August 24, 2016

Avoiding Overtreatment at the End of Life: Physician-Patient Communication and Truly Informed Consent

Barbara Noah has posted her new 65-page article in Pace Law Review: "Avoiding Overtreatment at the End of Life: Physician-Patient Communication and Truly Informed Consent."

This Article considers how best to ensure that patients have the tools to make informed choices about their care as they near death. Informed decision making can help reduce excessive end-of-life care and unnecessary suffering, and result in care that aligns with patients’ well-considered values and preferences. The many factors that contribute to dying patients receiving too much therapy and life-prolonging care include: the culture of denial of death, physicians’ professional culture and attitudes toward treatment, physicians’ fear of liability, physicians’ avoidance of discussions about prognosis, and the impact of payment incentives that encourage overutilization of medical technologies.

Under the doctrine of informed consent, physicians have an ethical and legal obligation to provide patients with timely and accurate information that will enable patients to make informed decisions about end-of-life care. However, compliance with the informed consent law does not ensure that patients’ decisions are truly informed. The Authors provide several tools and techniques available to help physicians and patients achieve the goal of truly informed decision making, including training to promote the practice of shared decision making and the use of decision aids.

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Published Articles (29)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 9 - Sep 2016

The Importance of Fostering Ownership During Medical Training Alex Dubov, Liana Fraenkel & Elizabeth Seng

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 9 - Sep 2016

Owning Medical Professionalism Jon C. Tilburt & Richard R. Sharp

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 7 Issue 3 - Jul 2016

Religious identity and workplace discrimination: A national survey of American Muslim physicians Aasim I. Padela, Huda Adam, Maha Ahmad, Zahra Hosseinian & Farr Curlin

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 7 Issue 3 - Jul 2016

Improving third-year medical students' competency in clinical moral reasoning: Two interventions Paul J. Cummins, Katherine J. Mendis, Robert Fallar, Amanda Favia, Lily Frank, Carolyn Plunkett, Nada Gligorov & Rosamond Rhodes

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 7 Issue 3 - Jul 2016

Experimental evidence showing that physician guidance promotes perceptions of physician empathy Daniel Russell Hans, Priyanka Dubé & Jason Adam Wasserman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 8 - Aug 2016

The Curious Case of the De-ICD: Negotiating the Dynamics of Autonomy and Paternalism in Complex Clinical Relationships Daryl Pullman & Kathleen Hodgkinson

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 8 - Aug 2016

Reason, Emotion, and Implanted Devices John D. Lantos

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 1 - Jan 2016

Professional Judgment and Justice: Equal Respect for the Professional Judgment of Critical-Care Physicians David Magnus & Norm Rizk

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 10 - Oct 2015

Do Patients Want to Participate in Decisions About Their Own Medical Care? John D. Lantos

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 4 - Apr 2015

Ideology and Microbiology: Ebola, Science, and Deliberative Democracy Joseph J. Fins

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News (2028)

August 25, 2016 8:00 am

Doctors Get Disciplined For Misconduct; Drug Firms Keep Paying Them (NPR)

Hundreds of pharmaceutical and medical device companies continue to pay doctors as promotional speakers and advisers after they’ve been disciplined for serious misconduct, according to an analysis by ProPublica.

August 18, 2016 8:00 am

Florida Keys Opposition Stalls Tests Of Genetically Altered Mosquitoes (NPR)

The fight against the Zika virus has a new weapon: the genetically engineered mosquito. It’s recently been approved by federal regulators and may soon be available in parts of the U.S. that are confronting the virus, like Puerto Rico and Miami.

August 15, 2016 8:00 am

Health Buzz: Most Children Lack Ideal Heart Health (US News)

The cardiovascular health of U.S. children is strikingly dismal, so says a new statement from the American Heart Association. Specifically, less than 1 percent of American children meet the organization’s definition of ideal cardiovascular health, according to statement author Dr. Julia Steinberger, a professor in pediatrics and director of pediatric cardiology at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

July 26, 2016 8:33 am

A New Depression Treatment Shows Promise (Time)

A new method known as behavioral activation (BA) is effective and can be cheaper than cognitive behavioral therapy.

July 19, 2016 8:26 am

Medicine is failing obese people (Vox)

Watching a person die from cardiac arrest in an intensive care unit is devastating. It’s especially so when the person is a woman in her 40s who has been smothered to death by her own weight — and we doctors can do nothing to save her.

July 15, 2016 8:46 am

Opioid Bill Reframes Addiction As A Health Problem, Not A Crime (NPR)

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

July 12, 2016 8:36 am

Women Doctors Are Paid $20,000 Less Than Male Doctors (Time)

In academic medicine, female full professors earn the same amount as male associate professors.

July 7, 2016 8:02 am

Seniors with access to medical marijuana use fewer prescription drugs (Reuters)

Physicians wrote significantly fewer prescriptions for painkillers and other medications for elderly and disabled patients who had legal access to medical marijuana, a new study finds.

July 6, 2016 8:05 am

Few Young Doctors Are Training To Care For U.S. Elderly (NPR)

At Edgewood Summit retirement community in Charleston, W.Va., 93-year-old Mary Mullens is waxing eloquent about her geriatrician, Dr. Todd Goldberg. “He’s sure got a lot to do,” she says, “and does it so well.” West Virginia has the third oldest population in the nation, right behind Maine and Florida. But Goldberg is one of only 36 geriatricians in the state.

June 30, 2016 8:40 am

Doctors less satisfied, more burned out with electronic records (Reuters)

Most doctors who use electronic health records and order entry software tend to be less satisfied with how much time they spend on clerical tasks and are at higher risk of burnout than others, according to a new study.

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