Hot Topics: Justice

Blog Posts (74)

December 5, 2018

Ethical Guidelines for DNA testing in Migrant Family Reunification

This blog post will appear in a future issue of the American Journal of Bioethics

by Nita Farahany, JD, PhD; Saheel Chodavadia; and Sara H.

November 27, 2018

Open Letter to Trump, Whitaker and Nielsen: Give safe passage to legal asylum seekers

“A group of ethicists, public health and health policy experts, healthcare providers, and lawyers has composed an open letter to President Donald J.
October 30, 2018

A Jewish Bioethicist Responds to Hate

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

 “Whoever kills a person [unjustly]…it is as though he has killed all mankind. And whoever saves a life, it is as though he had saved all mankind.” (Qur’an, 5:32)

When I was about 7 years old, my father was completing the newspaper crossword when he called me over to sit in his lap.…

October 22, 2018

The One Health Approach to Zoonotic Emerging Infectious Diseases

The following post can also be found in the October 2018
issue of the American Journal of Bioethics.

by Ariadne Nichol and David Magnus, Ph.D.

October 12, 2018

BioethicsTV (October 8-12, 2018): #TheResident #TheGoodDoctor #ChicagoMed #GreysAnatomy

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“Exploring ethical issues in TV medical dramas”

Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 3): Saline shortage, pressure to bill; Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 3): Structural discrimination against women; surrogate decision-making; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 3): Best interest of a child; faith versus science; Jump to Grey’s Anatomy (Season 15; Episode 4): Fraud, assault, lies, and the ethics police

Medical dramas this week seemed to focus on two themes: 1.…

September 27, 2018

Investigative Genealogy: Guilty by Familial Association

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

This week I was on a panel discussing the topic of genealogical searchingrunning a DNA sample found at a crime scene against criminal, public and commercial DNA databases with the goal of not finding a suspect, but to find a relative of the suspect.…

August 31, 2018

On Protecting the Agency of Undocumented Immigrants from Patterns of Our Past

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN ETHICS PRIZE HONORABLE MENTION By Elizabeth Doty In the history of the United States rhetoric alienating immigrants, documented and undocumented, has consistently pervaded everyday life across the nation, from the front page of The New York Times to college campuses to airports to Congressional hearings to, indeed, even research. While I […]
August 14, 2018

Is Japan Alone in Disadvantaging Female Medical School Applicants?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last December, I wrote a post about #MeToo in bioethics. I wish this could be a one-time topic and all of the problems were fixed, but alas this is a problem of structural inequality.…

July 11, 2018

Secret Twin Experiments & Bioethics.net 15 seconds of fame

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

On the advice of a family friend, I went to see the new documentary, Three Identical Strangers.

July 1, 2018

Confusion and Conscientious Objection in Arizona

by Steven H. Miles, MD and Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

Nicole Mone Arteaga was trying to get pregnant. It had been difficult for her.…

View More Blog Entries

Published Articles (12)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 10 - Oct 2018

Shrinking Poor White Life Spans: Class, Race, and Health Justice Erika Blacksher

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 18 Issue 3 - Sep 2018

Punishing Intentions and Neurointerventions David Birks & Alena Buyx

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

Performance-Enhancing Drugs, Sport, and the Ideal of Natural Athletic Performance Sigmund Loland

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 3 - Mar 2018

Ethical Dilemmas in Protecting Susceptible Subpopulations From Environmental Health Risks: Liberty, Utility, Fairness, and Accountability for Reasonableness David B. Resnik, D. Robert MacDougall & Elise M. Smith

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 4 - Dec 2017

Epistemic injustice in dementia and autism patient organizations: An empirical analysis Karin Jongsma, Elisabeth Spaeth & Silke Schicktanz

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

A Question of Social Justice: How Policies of Profit Negate Engagement of Developing World Bioethicists and Undermine Global Bioethics Subrata Chattopadhyay, Catherine Myser, Tiffany Moxham & Raymond De Vries

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

Justice and Bioethics: Who Should Finance Academic Publishing? Udo Schuklenk (Joint Editor in Chief) & David Magnus (Editor in Chief)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 5 - May 2017

Ethics, Refugees, and the President's Executive Order Nancy E. Kass

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Psychiatric Genomics and Mental Health Treatment: Setting the Ethical Agenda Camillia Kong, Michael Dunn & Michael Parker

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Psychiatric Genetics in a Risk Society Nicole Martinez-Martin

News (48)

December 11, 2018 9:15 am

The CRISPR Baby Scandal Gets Worse by the Day (The Atlantic)

Before last week, few people had heard the name He Jiankui. But on November 25, the young Chinese researcher became the center of a global firestorm when it emerged that he had allegedly made the first crispr-edited babies, twin girls named Lulu and Nana. Antonio Regalado broke the story for MIT Technology Review, and He himself described the experiment at an international gene-editing summit in Hong Kong. After his talk, He revealed that another early pregnancy is under way.

It is still unclear if He did what he claims to have done. Nonetheless, the reaction was swift and negative. The crispr pioneer Jennifer Doudna says she was “horrified,” NIH Director Francis Collins said the experiment was “profoundly disturbing,” and even Julian Savulescu, an ethicist who has described gene-editing research as “a moral necessity,” described He’s work as “monstrous.”

December 9, 2018 12:47 pm

Why Are Scientists So Upset About the First Crispr Babies? (The New York Times)

A Chinese scientist recently claimed he had produced the world’s first gene-edited babies, setting off a global firestorm. If true — the scientist has not yet published data that would confirm it — his actions would be a sensational breach of international scientific conventions. Although gene editing holds promise to potentially correct dangerous disease-causing mutations and treat some medical conditions, there are many safety and ethical concerns about editing human embryos.

Here are answers to some of the numerous questions swirling around this development.

December 6, 2018 9:00 am

If you’re single with cancer, you may get less aggressive treatment than a married person (The Washington Post)

If you are divorced, widowed or never married and develop cancer, watch out. You may get less aggressive treatment than your married friends.

We’ve often heard about studies showing that married adults are more likely to survive cancer than singles. But buried in those same studies is another finding that hasn’t made the headlines. When surgery or radiotherapy is the treatment of choice, patients with spouses are more likely to get it.

November 16, 2018 9:00 am

When Hospitals Merge to Save Money, Patients Often Pay More (The New York Times)

The mergers have essentially banished competition and raised prices for hospital admissions in most cases, according to an examination of 25 metropolitan areas with the highest rate of consolidation from 2010 through 2013, a peak period for mergers.

November 13, 2018 9:00 am

Genetics research 'biased towards studying white Europeans' (The Guardian)

People from minority ethnic backgrounds are set to lose out on medical benefits of genetics research due to an overwhelming bias towards studying white European populations, a leading scientist has warned.

Prof David Curtis, a geneticist and psychiatrist at University College London, has called on funding bodies to do more to address the emerging issue that genetic tests developed using samples from white Europeans can give meaningless results when applied to other ethnic groups. The problem could intensify as the clinical applications of genetics expand over the next decade.

November 2, 2018 9:00 am

Aging can be hard for those in the trans community (The Washington Post)

“We were both aware that in the LGBTQ world, there’s a fair amount of ageism and lack of awareness about aging, and in the aging world there’s a fair amount of homophobia and transphobia and lack of awareness of LGBTQ issues, especially trans identities.”

October 23, 2018 9:00 am

Why White Supremacists Are Chugging Milk (and Why Geneticists Are Alarmed) (The New York Times)

Worry about how new tools are allowing us to home in on the genetic basis of hot-button traits like intelligence will be misconstrued to fit racist ideologies.

October 20, 2018 9:00 am

The culprit’s name remains unknown. But he licked a stamp, and now his DNA stands indicted. (The Washington Post)

There was just enough spit on the back of the 9-cent stamp to piece together the identity of the person who licked it. Everything except for his name.

October 3, 2018 6:00 pm

Race, Ancestry, and Medical Research (JAMA)

The discussion of race and medicine in the United States is challenging and emotionally charged. Substantial disparities in health outcomes, based on race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, continue to exist; additional reports of racial bias and profound insensitivity in research continue to emerge in the popular media. A renewed discussion of race as a biological vs social construct has begun and is complicated by emerging data on genetics, race, and ancestry.

September 6, 2018 1:37 am

Blood-Testing Firm Theranos to Dissolve (The Wall Street Journal)

Theranos Inc., the blood-testing company accused of perpetrating Silicon Valley’s biggest fraud, will soon cease to exist.

View More News Items