Hot Topics: Justice

Blog Posts (57)

February 9, 2018

BioethicsTV (January 29-February 9): #TheResident, #TheGoodDoctor, #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Resident (Season 1; Episode 3): The Cost of a Life The episode opens with residents and nurses attending a required meeting on billing by a “billing consultant”.…

February 5, 2018

I, My Love, and Apps

This blog is a post of an editorial in the February 2018 issue of the American Journal of Bioethics. You can access the issue’s table of contents here.

February 5, 2018

Larry Nassar and Medicine's Duty of Self-Regulation

by Tyler S. Gibb, JD, PhD

Many news organizations have documented the horrific details of the crimes Larry Nassar, the disgraced former MSU and USGA gymnastic physician, committed against women and children over the course of his career (see, e.g., Indianapolis Star, Detroit Free Press, the New York Times, ESPN, and many more).…

January 26, 2018

BioethicsTV (January 23-26, 2018): Lying, Abused Surrogates, Right to Die, Who Pays for Care #TheGoodDoctor #ChicagoMed #GreysAnatomy

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Good Doctor (Season 1; Episode 13): Lying to protect and an abused surrogate

After a resident puts his hand on a patient’s arm, she asks him not to touch him.…

January 16, 2018

Black Women are Dying in Disproportionate Numbers During and After Giving Birth and not even Celebrity Serena Williams is Safe

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

In a previous blog I wrote about racial disparities in health and health care in which black patients fare much worse than white patients, including worse health outcomes.…

January 12, 2018

BioethicsTV (January 8-12, 2018): Convincing Patients to Consent; History of Sterilization

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Good Doctor (Season 1; Episode 11): Coercing Consent

A pair of conjoined twins are in the hospital for a kidney transplant from one twin to the other.…

December 9, 2017

Racial inequalities in cancer survival

Three studies published in a supplemental issue of the journal Cancer this month come to disturbing conclusions: in the United States, the survival rates for colon, breast, and ovarian cancer are lower for black people than for white people. The news isn’t all bad: overall cancer survival rates are going up. The three studies mentioned here draw from two larger studies of worldwide cancer survival, the CONCORD... // Read More »
December 9, 2017

Racial inequalities in cancer survival

Three studies published in a supplemental issue of the journal Cancer this month come to disturbing conclusions: in the United States, the survival rates for colon, breast, and ovarian cancer are lower for black people than for white people. The news isn’t all bad: overall cancer survival rates are going up. The three studies mentioned here draw from two larger studies of worldwide cancer survival, the CONCORD... // Read More »
December 5, 2017

#METOO Bioethics

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the December 4 episode of The Good Doctor, a medical resident is sexually harassed by her attending, who touches her when she is interacting with patients and asks her out to dinner.…

December 1, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017

World AIDS Day, December 1, 2017 National Aids Trust (NAT) “World AIDS Day takes place on the 1st December each year. It’s an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, to show support for people living with HIV, and to commemorate those who have died from an AIDS-related illness. Founded in … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017

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Published Articles (9)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 3 - Mar 2018

Ethical Dilemmas in Protecting Susceptible Subpopulations From Environmental Health Risks: Liberty, Utility, Fairness, and Accountability for Reasonableness David B. Resnik, D. Robert MacDougall & Elise M. Smith

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 4 - Dec 2017

Epistemic injustice in dementia and autism patient organizations: An empirical analysis Karin Jongsma, Elisabeth Spaeth & Silke Schicktanz

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

A Question of Social Justice: How Policies of Profit Negate Engagement of Developing World Bioethicists and Undermine Global Bioethics Subrata Chattopadhyay, Catherine Myser, Tiffany Moxham & Raymond De Vries

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

Justice and Bioethics: Who Should Finance Academic Publishing? Udo Schuklenk (Joint Editor in Chief) & David Magnus (Editor in Chief)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 5 - May 2017

Ethics, Refugees, and the President's Executive Order Nancy E. Kass

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Psychiatric Genomics and Mental Health Treatment: Setting the Ethical Agenda Camillia Kong, Michael Dunn & Michael Parker

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Psychiatric Genetics in a Risk Society Nicole Martinez-Martin

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

The Ethics of Organ Donor Registration Policies: Nudges and Respect for Autonomy Douglas MacKay & Alexandra Robinson

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 10 - Oct 2016

Governance of Transnational Global Health Research Consortia and Health Equity Bridget Pratt & Adnan A. Hyder

News (30)

April 4, 2018 9:00 am

DEA’s opioid crackdown brings arrests of prescribers, pharmacists (Washington Post)

The Drug Enforcement Administration arrested 28 drug prescribers and pharmacists, and revoked the licenses of 147 people who handle controlled substances, as part of a nationwide crackdown on the illegal use and distribution of opioids and other prescription medications, the Justice Department announced Monday.

March 28, 2018 9:00 am

How Genetics Is Changing Our Understanding of ‘Race’ (The New York Times)

In 1942, the anthropologist Ashley Montagu published “Man’s Most Dangerous Myth: The Fallacy of Race,” an influential book that argued that race is a social concept with no genetic basis. A classic example often cited is the inconsistent definition of “black.” In the United States, historically, a person is “black” if he has any sub-Saharan African ancestry; in Brazil, a person is not “black” if he is known to have any European ancestry. If “black” refers to different people in different contexts, how can there be any genetic basis to it?

March 2, 2018 9:00 am

The least and most dangerous countries to be a newborn (CNN)

Every year around the world, about 2.6 million babies die within their first month of life — and some countries see more of those tragic deaths than others. A UNICEF report released Tuesday ranks countries by their newborn mortality rates in 2016.

January 2, 2018 9:00 am

Retirement home shut down months after attack on 86-year-old (CNN)

December 29, 2017 9:00 am

Doctor faces charges over opioid prescriptions and 5 patient deaths (CNN)

A Pennsylvania doctor charged with causing the deaths of five patients by unlawfully prescribing opioids surrendered his license to prescribe controlled substances at a federal court hearing.

December 22, 2017 9:00 am

Ohio bill would prohibit abortions in Down syndrome cases (CNN)

The bill prohibits abortions after tests reveal Down syndrome in a fetus or if there’s “any other reason to believe” the fetus has the genetic condition. A person performing an abortion in such a case could face a fourth-degree felony charge, and physicians could lose their licenses. The woman seeking the abortion would not be held accountable, according to the bill.

December 20, 2017 9:00 am

He was a renowned surgeon — until a doctor found his initials burned on a patient's liver (Washington Post)

Simon Bramhall, 53, pleaded guilty Wednesday to two counts of assault by beating after he burned his initials into two of his patients’ organs in 2013.

December 15, 2017 9:00 am

A Chinese province is collecting DNA and iris scans from all its residents (Business Insider)

Authorities in the Chinese province of Xinjiang have begun collecting DNA and biometrics from all its residents, Human Rights Watch reported Wednesday.

December 7, 2017 9:00 am

'Thanksgiving miracle': Baby denied kidney receives transplant (CNN)

Two-year-old AJ Burgess received a new kidney Wednesday after a prolonged battle with hospital officials who postponed his original October surgery when his father, a perfect donor match, violated his parole and was arrested.

October 10, 2017 9:00 am

Knowingly infecting others with HIV is no longer a felony in California. Advocates say it targeted sex workers. (Washington Post)

California lawmakers have passed legislation to reduce the penalty for those who knowingly or intentionally expose others to HIV without their knowledge, rolling back a law that mostly affected sex workers. The bill, SB 239, which was approved by the Democrat-controlled state legislature in September and signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown on Friday, will lower the charges for these acts from a felony to a misdemeanor when the law goes into effect in 2018.

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