Hot Topics: Justice

Blog Posts (51)

December 9, 2017

Racial inequalities in cancer survival

Three studies published in a supplemental issue of the journal Cancer this month come to disturbing conclusions: in the United States, the survival rates for colon, breast, and ovarian cancer are lower for black people than for white people. The news isn’t all bad: overall cancer survival rates are going up. The three studies mentioned here draw from two larger studies of worldwide cancer survival, the CONCORD... // Read More »
December 9, 2017

Racial inequalities in cancer survival

Three studies published in a supplemental issue of the journal Cancer this month come to disturbing conclusions: in the United States, the survival rates for colon, breast, and ovarian cancer are lower for black people than for white people. The news isn’t all bad: overall cancer survival rates are going up. The three studies mentioned here draw from two larger studies of worldwide cancer survival, the CONCORD... // Read More »
December 5, 2017

#METOO Bioethics

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the December 4 episode of The Good Doctor, a medical resident is sexually harassed by her attending, who touches her when she is interacting with patients and asks her out to dinner.…

December 1, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017

World AIDS Day, December 1, 2017 National Aids Trust (NAT) “World AIDS Day takes place on the 1st December each year. It’s an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, to show support for people living with HIV, and to commemorate those who have died from an AIDS-related illness. Founded in … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017
December 1, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017

World AIDS Day, December 1, 2017 National Aids Trust (NAT) “World AIDS Day takes place on the 1st December each year. It’s an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, to show support for people living with HIV, and to commemorate those who have died from an AIDS-related illness. Founded in … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017
November 10, 2017

Refocusing professional standards and leadership for patient empowerment

This post is written in response to Ubel, Scherr and Fagerlin’s target article, “Empowerment Failure: How Shortcomings in Physician Communication Unwittingly Undermine Patient Autonomy” published in the November 2017 issue of The American Journal of Bioethics.

October 24, 2017

When the Government Prevents a Teen from Receiving an Abortion

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Update: The U.S. Court of Appeals in D.C. full panel ordered the government to arrange for Doe to receive her abortion.

October 13, 2017

BioethicsTV (October 9-13, 2017): Drinking on transplant list; big pharma in pandemics; mortality forces morality

The Good Doctor (Season 1; Episode 3): A Patient Takes A Drink While on the Transplant List

This week, a patient is finally at the top of the list for a heart transplant.…

October 12, 2017

Justice and Bioethics: Who Should Finance Academic Publishing?

by Udo Schuklenk (Joint Editor in Chief) & David Magnus (Editor in Chief)
We applaud Chattopadhyay, Muyser, Moxham & DeVries on their article, “A Question of Social Justice: How Policies of Profit Negate Engagement of Developing World Bioethicsts and Undermine Bioethicists” for tackling an important and often neglected topic in bioethics: the challenges that our under-resourced colleagues face in conducting research and contributing to the literature in bioethics.…

October 12, 2017

The Rescinding of DACA: What Should Healthcare Professionals and Academics Do? (And Why?)

by Mark G. Kuczewski, Ph.D. Danish Zaidi, MTS, MBE

Imagine that the 14th Amendment is repealed. Suddenly, birthright citizenship is no longer the accepted law of the United States.…

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Published Articles (7)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

A Question of Social Justice: How Policies of Profit Negate Engagement of Developing World Bioethicists and Undermine Global Bioethics Subrata Chattopadhyay, Catherine Myser, Tiffany Moxham & Raymond De Vries

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

Justice and Bioethics: Who Should Finance Academic Publishing? Udo Schuklenk (Joint Editor in Chief) & David Magnus (Editor in Chief)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 5 - May 2017

Ethics, Refugees, and the President's Executive Order Nancy E. Kass

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Psychiatric Genomics and Mental Health Treatment: Setting the Ethical Agenda Camillia Kong, Michael Dunn & Michael Parker

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Psychiatric Genetics in a Risk Society Nicole Martinez-Martin

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

The Ethics of Organ Donor Registration Policies: Nudges and Respect for Autonomy Douglas MacKay & Alexandra Robinson

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 10 - Oct 2016

Governance of Transnational Global Health Research Consortia and Health Equity Bridget Pratt & Adnan A. Hyder

News (22)

December 7, 2017 9:00 am

'Thanksgiving miracle': Baby denied kidney receives transplant (CNN)

Two-year-old AJ Burgess received a new kidney Wednesday after a prolonged battle with hospital officials who postponed his original October surgery when his father, a perfect donor match, violated his parole and was arrested.

October 10, 2017 9:00 am

Knowingly infecting others with HIV is no longer a felony in California. Advocates say it targeted sex workers. (Washington Post)

California lawmakers have passed legislation to reduce the penalty for those who knowingly or intentionally expose others to HIV without their knowledge, rolling back a law that mostly affected sex workers. The bill, SB 239, which was approved by the Democrat-controlled state legislature in September and signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown on Friday, will lower the charges for these acts from a felony to a misdemeanor when the law goes into effect in 2018.

October 5, 2017 9:00 am

Hepatitis C Drug’s Lower Cost Paves Way For Medicaid, Prisons To Expand Treatment (Kaiser Health News)

People who are incarcerated face an even tougher battle to get treatment for hepatitis C. Roughly 17 percent of prisoners are infected with hepatitis C, compared with about 1 percent of the general population. Lawyers in a handful of states are pursuing class action lawsuits to force prisons to provide hepatitis C treatment. Mavyret may make a difference, said David Rudovsky, a civil rights lawyer who’s litigating a class action lawsuit against the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections.

June 27, 2017 9:00 am

Scientists in limbo as US Supreme Court allows modified travel ban (Nature)

Justices overturn lower court rulings on policy targeting people from six majority-Muslim countries.

May 31, 2017 9:00 am

Colombian biologist cleared of criminal charges for posting another scientist’s thesis online (Nature)

A Colombian biologist who faced a criminal trial for posting another scientist’s thesis online has been cleared of copyright violation — an offence that, under Colombian law, might have brought him a jail sentence.

May 5, 2017 9:00 am

Artificial intelligence prevails at predicting Supreme Court decisions (Science)

“See you in the Supreme Court!” President Donald Trump tweeted last week, responding to lower court holds on his national security policies. But is taking cases all the way to the highest court in the land a good idea? Artificial intelligence may soon have the answer. A new study shows that computers can do a better job than legal scholars at predicting Supreme Court decisions, even with less information.

April 13, 2017 9:00 am

US regulators test organs-on-chips for food safety monitoring (Nature)

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has started testing whether livers-on-a-chip — miniature ‘organs’ engineered to mimic biological functions — can reliably model human reactions to food and foodborne illnesses. The experiments will help the agency to determine whether companies can substitute chip data for animal data when applying for approval of a new compound, such as a food additive, that could prove toxic. It is the first time a regulatory agency anywhere in the world has pursued organs-on-chips as an alternative to animal testing.

April 3, 2017 9:00 am

Donald Trump believes the solution to the opioid crisis is talk (Vox)

President Donald Trump will soon sign an executive order to tackle what he’s called the “total epidemic” of opioid abuse and addiction. The main objective of the order is to create a commission that’s tasked with publishing a report on what to do about America’s deadliest drug crisis ever.

March 23, 2017 9:00 am

San people of Africa draft code of ethics for researchers (Science)

The San people of Southern Africa are among the closest living relatives of our hunting and gathering ancestors. Scientists have flocked to study their age-old rituals and ancient genetic fingerprints. Now, after more than a century of being scrutinized by science, the San are demanding something back. Earlier this month the group unveiled a code of ethics for researchers wishing to study their culture, genes, or heritage.

March 16, 2017 9:00 am

Should hospitals — and doctors — apologize for medical mistakes? (Washington Post)

Spurred by concerns about the “deny and defend” model — including its cost, lack of transparency and the perpetuation of errors — programs to circumvent litigation by offering prompt disclosure, apology and compensation for mistakes as an alternative to malpractice suits are becoming more popular.

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