Hot Topics: Media

Blog Posts (13)

July 29, 2014

AIN’T JUST THE MEAT IT IS ALSO THE MOTION: CONSENT MATTERS!

“But look, you found the notice, didn’t you?”

“Yes,” said Arthur. “yes I did. It was on display in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying ‘Beware of the Leopard.’”

                           –Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

Any apologia for Facebook’s recent behavioral study has to address one issue head on: that of informed consent.…

January 27, 2014

Bioethics Expertise In The Media of Public Opinion

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Over the last few months the bioethics wires have been ablaze with conversations about the McMath and Munoz cases.…

December 31, 2013

Distinguishing Science from Nonsense

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

As Americans enter 2014 there is grave concern among our political leaders that we are lagging behind other nations in terms of our children’s’ scientific literacy. …

November 13, 2013

“Time To Die” Means Time to Talk

by Craig M. Klugman, Ph.D.

Media images of dying surround us everyday. In an average hour of dramatic television, bodies fly across the screen as they are shot, knifed, bled, disintegrated, run over, and even decapitated.…

September 4, 2013

Media Meld: Science, Credit and Peer-Review

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week, a research team at the University of Washington announced what they jokingly refered to as a “Vulcan mind meld.” For those of you who are not Star Trek aficionados, that fictional process is where a Vulcan can reach into the mind of another Vulcan or human to understand and read that other mind.…

August 1, 2013

A new spin on identity theft

Andrea Kalfoglou, Ph.D.

A few years ago (2011), Facebook suggested that I “friend” a member of the bioethics community.  After all, 42 of my other Facebook “friends” were also linked to Dr.…

June 13, 2012

"The Descendants": The Bioethics Movie That Wasn't

Okay, I am probably one of the last people in the United States (no, probably the world) to watch the movie “The Descendants”.…

June 27, 2011

The Problem of Celebrity Medical Activism

In one sense, I will grant that celebrities, just as much as any other person on the planet, have a right to speak out in regard to whatever research or clinical issue they feel passionate about.…

June 13, 2011

Captain America: The Next Great Research Ethics Movie?

With Captain America: The First Avenger not due to release in theaters for more than 6 weeks, the hype is pretty astonishing.…

February 19, 2011

Docs Who Give Bad Tweet: Unprofessional or Just Uneducated?

Social networking among physicians is raising concerns for a variety of obvious reasons–it challenges our standard ways of thinking about the physician-patient relationship which for the most part has been confined to the exam room.…

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Published Articles (1)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 1 - Jan 2013

100th Issue Anniversary Editorial David Magnus

News (31)

February 10, 2014 6:39 pm

Scientist's Experiment in Fundraising

Scientist Plans to Raise $1.5 Million Through Online Solicitations

December 21, 2012 2:55 pm

Spending on food advertising to kids fell in '09 (Reuters)

Food companies spent considerably less to advertise to children in 2009 than they did in 2006 as they shifted to the Internet, and products pitched to kids got slightly healthier, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission said in a report on Friday.

September 25, 2012 8:42 pm

Robin Roberts’ illness raises questions about extent of coverage (Washington Post)

 NEW YORK — “Good Morning America” cameras were there last week when co-host Robin Roberts underwent a bone marrow transplant. So were her colleagues Diane Sawyer and Sam Champion, wearing surgical masks and singing songs of encouragement. All of it was on the next day’s show, along with a detailed interview with Roberts’ doctor.  A visibly spent Roberts recorded a message to fans from a hospital bed that she could “feel the love.” ABC News’ website encourages people to “follow Robin’s journey.” Followers are pitched $5 wristbands to benefit a bone marrow registry, which her “Good Morning America” co-workers wear on TV.
July 11, 2012 6:50 pm

Professionalism: Social media mishaps (CMAJ)

One of the primary reasons medical professionalism is lagging online is that the doctors who use social media the most are from a different generation than those who know the most about maintaining the reputation of the profession. “People who have a blog or are on Twitter and Facebook tend to be on the younger side. People with more wisdom about professional boundary issues tend to be on the older side. There is a bit of a gap there and a lack of training and mentorship in this area,” says Dr. David Brendel, a psychiatrist practising in the area of Boston, Massachusetts, and a sought-after educator on matters of medical ethics and professionalism (drdavidbrendel.com).

June 7, 2012 12:34 pm

Disney bans junk food, Mickey Mouse brands health. Hmmm... (Christian Science Monitor)

On Tuesday, First Lady Michelle Obama and Walt Disney Co. Chairman and CEO Robert Iger announced that as of 2015 Disney will ban junk-food advertising on its children’s television and radio programs. Once the new regulations are in effect, food and beverage products will have to meet nutritional guidelines for serving size, calories, and fat and sugar content. Which means no more cartoon characters peddling sugary cereal or mass-processed cookies in the middle of Saturday morning kids programming.

June 7, 2012 12:29 pm

Zombies are not a health problem (for us). Should they be a solution? (Philadelphia Inquirer)

In May 2011, the CDC launched a zombie apocalypse social media campaign to raise public awareness around the importance of emergency preparedness.  The zombie approach — which included a comic book featuring vicious looking zombies and blog post by Assistant Surgeon General Ali S. Khan (inaugurating a full zombie category of posts) — was a novel spin on a decade’s worth of unsuccessful efforts aimed at getting Americans to prepare for natural disasters and public emergencies (i.e., stockpile extra food and water, have duct tape and flash lights on hand, make a plan, etc).  The  CDC thought a “sexier” approach might get more people  interested this serious issue.

April 30, 2012 2:57 pm

Patients want to use social media tools to manage health care (American Medical News)

Some patients have moved beyond wanting social media content they can “follow” or “like.” They want social media to be something that helps them coordinate care and navigate the health care system, and they think physicians are the best people to deliver it.

April 16, 2012 4:20 pm

Can the Innovator Class Save Healthcare? (The Atlantic)

Perched on the banks of the Potomac River, the TEDMED gathering weighed in last week on what it considered the greatest challenges facing healthcare. A meeting closely associated with the high tech-optimism of Silicon Valley and other outposts of America’s innovator class, TEDMED came east this year from it’s previous home in San Diego. The idea was to bring the gathering’s ethos and its troupe of entrepreneurs, thinkers, futurists, doers, and artists to our nation’s political capital.

March 9, 2012 2:55 pm

Jon Stewart 'our greatest public intellectual'? (Chicago Tribune)

Loyola University‘s Kayhan Parsi says the host of Comedy Central‘s“The Daily Show” has become “our greatest public intellectual,” echoing comments he wrote in a recent issue of The American Journal of Bioethics. Perhaps anticipating the reaction, Parsi then added in that piece, “This is no joke.” #bioethics #comedy #jonstewart

March 6, 2012 10:31 am

Bioethicist Calls Jon Stewart 'Our Greatest Public Intellectual' (Newsroom America)

Kayhan Parsi, AJOB Associate Editor and Graduate Studies Director at Loyola University Chicago, has argued in an article in the American Journal of Bioethics, that political satirist Jon Stewart “our greatest public intellectual. This is no joke.” #bioethics  #media #politics

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