Hot Topics: Media

Blog Posts (66)

October 18, 2016

BioethicsTV: 10/11-10/17 – Assaulting demented patients, sex trafficking, and surrogate decision-making

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

An occasional column examining the ethical issues raised in television medical dramas.

On Code Black (Season 2; Episode 3) the most important ethical issue was very brief, not taking more than about 2 minutes of screen time.…

October 12, 2016

Weighty Choices: Ethical Challenges of Addressing Eating Disorders

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE FIRST-PLACE WINNER  By: Geena Roth In certain situations, the moral or ethical decision is obvious, but more often than not, there are a number of complicating factors.  Almost all decisions we make will affect more than … Continue reading
October 11, 2016

BioethicsTV: Oct 3-7 – Surrogate Consent, Grace, Conscientious Objection, End of Life Conversations and Lessons on Utilitarianism

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

BioethicsTV is an special section of that looks at the ethical issues raised in television medical dramas

Code Black (season 2, episode 3) revolved around a bus crash.…

October 10, 2016

“Locker Room Talk” Does Matter Mr. Trump

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Over the last few days, a number of recordings have come to light showing Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump saying lewd, lascivious, and down right crass statements about women.…

September 30, 2016

BioethicsTV: Community Research Consent and Competing for an Infant Heart

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the fall premiere of Code Black, military trauma surgeons are visiting the hospital on an annual pilgrimage to share what they have learned treating battlefield injuries.…

September 23, 2016

BioethicsTV: Ethicists go to the Good Place

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Good Place: A new NBC comedy is not about medicine but about a selfish woman, Eleanor, who accidentally is brought to the “good place” after death.…

September 21, 2016

War Metaphors in Health Care: What Are They Good For?

by Kayhan Parsi, JD PhD

Protest singer Edwin Starr powerfully asked in the early 1970s: “War, what is it good for?” Apparently, it’s good enough to use in a variety of metaphorical turns of phrase.…

August 25, 2016

Do the EPA Exposure Studies Violate Do No Harm and Informed Consent?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D

A government agency recruits elderly and sick patients for an important research study. In a controlled environment, subjects are exposed to airborne pollutants at levels many times higher than found in the real world.…

July 13, 2016

Where’s the Social Justice?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Picking up a newspaper or clicking to your favorite news site could lead one to believe that the U.S.…

July 1, 2016

BioethicsTV: The Night Shift Needs More Sleep

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Summer is a slow time for television and especially for the medical drama. One show that has been filling this warm weather slot is The Night Shift, a fairly uninteresting and poorly done drama.…

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Published Articles (2)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

Diagnosis by Documentary: Professional Responsibilities in Informal Encounters Alistair Wardrope & Markus Reuber

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 1 - Jan 2013

100th Issue Anniversary Editorial David Magnus

News (39)

September 13, 2016 8:00 am

Hillary Clinton's Reluctance To Address Health Issues Follows A Long Tradition (NPR)

Hillary Clinton’s begrudging release of information related to her health on Sunday follows a pattern set by candidates and many who have won the Oval Office. It is a pattern of secrecy and, in some cases, cover-ups that would be scandalous if they occurred on other issues of policy.

June 8, 2016 8:53 am

This Is How Much Celebrities Get Paid To Endorse Soda And Unhealthy Food (NPR)

A new study published in the journal Pediatrics describes the lucrative endorsement deals of 65 music celebrities — including Britney Spears, Maroon 5, Timberlake and other stars popular with teens and young adults. These celebrities promoted 57 different food and beverage brands (see chart), ranging from soda to energy drinks to pizza, Pop Tarts and candy.

June 7, 2016 8:46 am

Most Violent Crimes Are Wrongly Linked to Mental Illness (Time)

Despite the fact that most people with mental illness are never violent, news stories about violence often focus on whether a person’s mental health problem was responsible, according to a new report.

June 6, 2016 8:48 am

Families Isolated By Rare Genetic Conditions Find New Ways To Reach Out (NPR)

Shortly after Milo Lorentzen was born, nurses whisked him away to the neonatal intensive care unit for low blood sugar and jaundice. An exam then found a cluster of irregularities, including a cleft palate and a hole in his heart.

May 10, 2016 8:07 am

Researcher under fire for New Yorker epigenetics article (Nature)

A story about epigenetics in the 2 May issue of The New Yorker has been sharply criticized for inaccurately describing how genes are regulated. The article by Siddhartha Mukherjee — a physician, cancer researcher and award-winning author at Columbia University in New York — examines how environmental factors can change the activity of genes without altering the DNA sequence. Jerry Coyne, an evolutionary ecologist at the University of Chicago in Illinois, posted two widely discussed blog posts calling the piece “superficial and misleading”, largely because it ignored key aspects of gene regulation.

May 6, 2016 8:37 am

Can A Hospital Tell A Doctor To Stop Talking About Abortion? (NPR)

One of the country’s most outspoken abortion providers has filed a civil rights complaint against the hospital where she works, saying that it has wrongly banned her from giving media interviews.

April 25, 2016 10:32 am

Teens most drawn to e-cigarettes by online ads (Reuters)

While many forms of e-cigarette advertising increase the odds that teens will try the devices, a new U.S. study suggests that this generation of digital natives is most enticed by promotions they see online.

April 22, 2016 9:52 am

New York Hospital to Pay $2.2 Million Over Unauthorized Filming of 2 Patients

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital has agreed to pay a $2.2 million penalty to federal regulators for allowing television crews to film two patients without their consent — one who was dying, the other in significant distress. Regulators said on Thursday that the hospital allowed filming to continue even after a medical professional asked that it stop.

February 10, 2014 6:39 pm

Scientist's Experiment in Fundraising

Scientist Plans to Raise $1.5 Million Through Online Solicitations

December 21, 2012 2:55 pm

Spending on food advertising to kids fell in '09 (Reuters)

Food companies spent considerably less to advertise to children in 2009 than they did in 2006 as they shifted to the Internet, and products pitched to kids got slightly healthier, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission said in a report on Friday.

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