Hot Topics: Media

Blog Posts (58)

July 13, 2016

Where’s the Social Justice?

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Picking up a newspaper or clicking to your favorite news site could lead one to believe that the U.S.…

July 1, 2016

BioethicsTV: The Night Shift Needs More Sleep

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Summer is a slow time for television and especially for the medical drama. One show that has been filling this warm weather slot is The Night Shift, a fairly uninteresting and poorly done drama.…

June 8, 2016

BioethicsTV: Grace and Frankie Kill Their Friend

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Netflix series Grace and Frankie ended its second season with an end-of-life dilemma. The show has been hailed for its portrayal of active, interesting, and vibrant older characters and its embracing of families of all sizes, types, and colors.…

May 20, 2016

BioethicsTV: Week of May 20 – Assisted suicide, public health crisis management, and making promises

Chicago Med
In its first season finale (episode 18), Dr. Downey arrives in the emergency department in distress—he is bleeding from his liver as a side effect from his cancer treatment.…

May 13, 2016

BioethicsTV: Paternalism (again) on Chicago Med

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Our favorite television dramas this week were light on bioethics issues with the exception of Chicago Med (season 1; episode 17 “Withdrawal”) that continues to explore bioethical issues.…

May 4, 2016

Methodological Miasma not mental dystrophy plagues drug trials

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D. and Bruce Levin, Ph.D.

The Wall Street Journal and many other media outlets chose to beat on the FDA for its recent decision to deny approval of eteplirsen, a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy being developed by Sarepta Therapeutics.…

May 3, 2016

BioethicsTV: Containment Fails to Go Viral

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The CW network began airing a “limited” series (what used to be called a mini-series) drama about a bio-terrorism outbreak in the city of Atlanta.…

March 30, 2016

BIOETHICSTV: Chicago Med 3/29

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

BioethicsTV is an occasional bioethics.net feature where we examine bioethical issues raised in televised medical dramas.

Tonight marked the mid-season premiere of Chicago Med, a freshman television show that seems to relish throwing professional and bioethical issues at its audience.…

March 30, 2016

What can celebrities do for bioethics?

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Television, film, theater, sports, and music celebrities (and other famous people who only seem to be famous for being famous) capture the public’s attention with tales of the celebrity lives and the perks and downfalls that come with being a public figure.…

March 24, 2016

BIOETHICSTV: "Heartbeat" is Flat

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

This week another new medical show premiered; this time on NBC. Heartbeat follows the story of Dr.…

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Published Articles (1)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 1 - Jan 2013

100th Issue Anniversary Editorial David Magnus

News (38)

June 8, 2016 8:53 am

This Is How Much Celebrities Get Paid To Endorse Soda And Unhealthy Food (NPR)

A new study published in the journal Pediatrics describes the lucrative endorsement deals of 65 music celebrities — including Britney Spears, Maroon 5, Timberlake and other stars popular with teens and young adults. These celebrities promoted 57 different food and beverage brands (see chart), ranging from soda to energy drinks to pizza, Pop Tarts and candy.

June 7, 2016 8:46 am

Most Violent Crimes Are Wrongly Linked to Mental Illness (Time)

Despite the fact that most people with mental illness are never violent, news stories about violence often focus on whether a person’s mental health problem was responsible, according to a new report.

June 6, 2016 8:48 am

Families Isolated By Rare Genetic Conditions Find New Ways To Reach Out (NPR)

Shortly after Milo Lorentzen was born, nurses whisked him away to the neonatal intensive care unit for low blood sugar and jaundice. An exam then found a cluster of irregularities, including a cleft palate and a hole in his heart.

May 10, 2016 8:07 am

Researcher under fire for New Yorker epigenetics article (Nature)

A story about epigenetics in the 2 May issue of The New Yorker has been sharply criticized for inaccurately describing how genes are regulated. The article by Siddhartha Mukherjee — a physician, cancer researcher and award-winning author at Columbia University in New York — examines how environmental factors can change the activity of genes without altering the DNA sequence. Jerry Coyne, an evolutionary ecologist at the University of Chicago in Illinois, posted two widely discussed blog posts calling the piece “superficial and misleading”, largely because it ignored key aspects of gene regulation.

May 6, 2016 8:37 am

Can A Hospital Tell A Doctor To Stop Talking About Abortion? (NPR)

One of the country’s most outspoken abortion providers has filed a civil rights complaint against the hospital where she works, saying that it has wrongly banned her from giving media interviews.

April 25, 2016 10:32 am

Teens most drawn to e-cigarettes by online ads (Reuters)

While many forms of e-cigarette advertising increase the odds that teens will try the devices, a new U.S. study suggests that this generation of digital natives is most enticed by promotions they see online.

April 22, 2016 9:52 am

New York Hospital to Pay $2.2 Million Over Unauthorized Filming of 2 Patients

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital has agreed to pay a $2.2 million penalty to federal regulators for allowing television crews to film two patients without their consent — one who was dying, the other in significant distress. Regulators said on Thursday that the hospital allowed filming to continue even after a medical professional asked that it stop.

February 10, 2014 6:39 pm

Scientist's Experiment in Fundraising

Scientist Plans to Raise $1.5 Million Through Online Solicitations

December 21, 2012 2:55 pm

Spending on food advertising to kids fell in '09 (Reuters)

Food companies spent considerably less to advertise to children in 2009 than they did in 2006 as they shifted to the Internet, and products pitched to kids got slightly healthier, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission said in a report on Friday.

September 25, 2012 8:42 pm

Robin Roberts’ illness raises questions about extent of coverage (Washington Post)

 NEW YORK — “Good Morning America” cameras were there last week when co-host Robin Roberts underwent a bone marrow transplant. So were her colleagues Diane Sawyer and Sam Champion, wearing surgical masks and singing songs of encouragement. All of it was on the next day’s show, along with a detailed interview with Roberts’ doctor.  A visibly spent Roberts recorded a message to fans from a hospital bed that she could “feel the love.” ABC News’ website encourages people to “follow Robin’s journey.” Followers are pitched $5 wristbands to benefit a bone marrow registry, which her “Good Morning America” co-workers wear on TV.

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