Hot Topics: Public Health

Blog Posts (169)

August 24, 2018

Immigrant Health and the Moral Scandal of the “Public Charge” Rule

A long-anticipated policy change proposed by the Trump administration that would count the use of many federally-subsidized programs against immigrants currently eligible to use them threatens public health and would undermine ethical practice in health professions and systems. The policy would expand the definition of a public charge, someone likely to become dependent on government… Read more

The post Immigrant Health and the Moral Scandal of the “Public Charge” Rule appeared first on The Hastings Center.

July 24, 2018

Newspaper Op-Eds Should Disclose Authors’ Industry Ties

Earlier this month, The Seattle Times published an op-ed by Samuel Browd, medical director of Seattle Children’s Sport Concussion Program, on the risks of brain injury in youth sports. Dr. Browd acknowledged troubling research on the dangers of repetitive brain trauma, but also emphasized that millions of children “have played contact sports without overt symptoms” and… Read more

The post Newspaper Op-Eds Should Disclose Authors’ Industry Ties appeared first on The Hastings Center.

July 1, 2018

Confusion and Conscientious Objection in Arizona

by Steven H. Miles, MD and Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

Nicole Mone Arteaga was trying to get pregnant. It had been difficult for her.…

June 26, 2018

Welcome to the 2018 HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Fellows!

The Fordham University HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) is pleased to announce that the following individuals have been selected as 2018 Fellows: The Fordham University  HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI), now in its 8th year, is a training grant sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) (R25 DA031608-08), Principal Investigator, […]
June 19, 2018

Child abuse as immigration policy: has America lost its moral compass?

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

The President of the United States, after discussion with key aides in the White House, implemented a policy in June of 2018 allegedly aimed at discouraging illegal border crossings by asylum seekers and others from entering the United States.…

May 8, 2018

Speaking to the Media about Antimicrobial Resistance: A Deeper Description of How I Wear Many Hats as a Bioethicist

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week, I was interviewed by an academic news serviceabout antimicrobial resistance (AMR) after a study reported that giving antibiotics to children in selected African towns led to a decreased mortality rate.  …

May 7, 2018

BioethicsTV (April 30 – May 4): #TheResident; #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Resident (Season 1; Episode 12): Pressures of the Medical Life; Making promises; Chicago Med (Season 3; Episode 18): Crisis response

The Resident (Season 1; Episode 12): Pressures of the Medical Life; Making promises

When Bradley, a resident, falls through a glass ceiling and crashes onto the board room table, Bell’s first reaction is that neither the hospital nor he are responsible for the epidemic of suicides in medicine.…

April 17, 2018

The End is Nigh: Bioethics and Antibiotic Resistance

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

 ‘We’re out of Options’: Doctors Battle Drug-Resistant Typhoid Outbreak – 13 April 2018

New Concerns Over ‘Super Gonorrhea’ That’s Resistant to All Drugs – 4 April 2018

‘Nightmare’ bacteria, resistant to almost every drug, stalk U.S.

March 15, 2018

White Opioids: Pharmaceuticals, Race, and the War on Drugs That Wasn’t | Lecture with Helena Hansen, MD, PhD

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more than 115 Americans die every day due to opioid overdose, creating a national crisis affecting public health, social and economic welfare. To fully grasp how opioid addiction has affected United States communities, Americans need to see race as a key factor in how we approach drug […]
January 24, 2018

Where You Live in America Determines When You Die

Shutterstock Debates over income inequality divide liberals and conservatives. In the last few decades, income inequality has soared in the U.S. In the 1950s, the top 1% of Americans brought home about a tenth of the country’s income. By 2012, … Continue reading

The post Where You Live in America Determines When You Die appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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Published Articles (53)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 3 - Mar 2018

Ethical Dilemmas in Protecting Susceptible Subpopulations From Environmental Health Risks: Liberty, Utility, Fairness, and Accountability for Reasonableness David B. Resnik, D. Robert MacDougall & Elise M. Smith

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 4 - Dec 2017

Counseling parents at risk of delivery of an extremely premature infant: Differing strategies Marlyse F. Haward, Annie Janvier, John M. Lorenz & Baruch Fischhoff

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 4 - Dec 2017

How should we deal with misattributed paternity? A survey of lay public attitudes Georgia Lowe, Jonathan Pugh, Guy Kahane, Louise Corben, Sharon Lewis, Martin Delatycki & Julian Savulescu

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

Saving Life, Limb, and Eyesight: Assessing the Medical Rules of Eligibility During Armed Conflict Michael L. Gross

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

Now is the Time for a Postracial Medicine: Biomedical Research, the National Institutes of Health, and the Perpetuation of Scientific Racism Javier Perez-Rodriguez & Alejandro de la Fuente

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

A Bridge Back to the Future: Public Health Ethics, Bioethics, and Environmental Ethics Lisa M. Lee

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

We Can and Must Rebuild the Bridges of Interdisciplinary Bioethics Darryl R. J. Macer

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

Adolescent oncofertility discussions: Recommendations from a systematic literature review Dorit Barlevy, Bernice S. Elger, Tenzin Wangmo & Vardit Ravitsky

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

Qualitative study of participants' perceptions and preferences regarding research dissemination Rachel S. Purvis, Traci H. Abraham, Christopher R. Long, M. Kathryn Stewart, T. Scott Warmack & Pearl Anna McElfish

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 5 - May 2017

Ethical Issues in Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Practice Yonghui Ma, Jiayu Liu, Catherine Rhodes, Yongzhan Nie & Faming Zhang

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News (664)

October 8, 2018 9:00 am

Addiction Treatment Gap Is Driving A Black Market For Suboxone (NPR)

But addiction treatment professionals argue the problem of buprenorphine diversion is often misunderstood. A black market exists in part, they point out, because addiction treatment can be hard to find. President Trump is expected to sign a bill that would increase access to the medication, but it’s unclear how quickly that access will grow.

October 3, 2018 9:00 am

How Stratification Unites Ethical Issues in Precision Health (AMA Journal of Ethics)

The contributors to this issue address many of the ethical issues that arise in the context of precision health. Although none addresses the idea of stratification directly, the concept of stratification links their contributions together, since stratification is the basis of all precision health efforts. Stratification has only rarely been explored as a concept with ethical fallout and is often downplayed in favor of the label “precision.” Therefore, this editorial lays out how the ethical issues explored by our contributors and in precision health more broadly are united and organized by the concept of stratification.

September 4, 2018 1:24 am

China Has Withheld Samples of a Dangerous Flu Virus (The New York Times)

Despite an international agreement, U.S. health authorities still have not received H7N9 avian flu specimens from their Chinese counterparts.

August 17, 2018 9:00 am

Treating Teen Depression Might Improve Mental Health Of Parents Too (NPR)

An estimated 12.8 percent of adolescents in the U.S. experience at least one episode of major depression, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. According to previous studies, many of those teens’ mental health is linked to depression in their parents. But new research suggests there’s a flipside to that parental effect: When teens are treated for depression, their parents’ mental health improves, too.

August 15, 2018 9:00 am

Bayer shares slide after Monsanto's Roundup cancer trial (Reuters)

Shares in Bayer (BAYGn.DE) plunged more than 10 percent to their lowest in almost two years after a California jury ordered the German company’s subsidiary Monsanto to pay $289 million in damages last week.

July 18, 2018 3:21 am

‘Frightening’ drug-resistant strain of typhoid spreads in Pakistan (Science)

An antibiotic-defying strain of the bacterium that causes typhoid fever is gaining a foothold in Pakistan, leading some researchers to warn that it could turn the clock back 70 years, when surviving the disease was more a matter of luck than treatment. In the past 6 months, more than 2000 people in Pakistan have been infected with extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Salmonella typhi, according to the National Institute of Health in Islamabad. Only one oral antibiotic, azithromycin, works against the XDR strain, and the other options—expensive intravenous (IV) drugs—are impractical for widespread use in Pakistan and other low-income nations. S. typhi experts worry that the outbreak could soon spill into other countries.

June 13, 2018 9:00 am

The risk of 'contagion' after suicides is real (CNN)

Mental health experts agree that several high-profile celebrity suicides could possibly cause an increased risk of what’s called suicide contagion, and that all of us should be aware of the risk factors related to suicide.

June 12, 2018 9:00 am

CDC: U.S. Suicide Rates Have Climbed Dramatically (NPR)

The rise in suicide rates was highest in the central, northern region of the U.S., with North Dakota, for example, seeing a 57.6 percent increase since 1999. Nevada was the only state that saw no increase, and Delaware saw the smallest increase which was 5.9 percent.

June 8, 2018 9:00 am

With The Rise Of Legal Weed, Drug Education Moves From 'Don't' to 'Delay' (NPR)

California legalized marijuana in 2016, and on Jan. 1, 2018, eager customers lined up in the darkness outside medical marijuana dispensaries across the state, ready to start shopping at the stroke of midnight. The effect has gone beyond the cannabis cash register. Everyone has seen the ads or heard the chatter — and that includes minors, though marijuana remains illegal for those under 21.

May 8, 2018 7:17 pm

Ebola outbreak declared in Democratic Republic of Congo (CNN)

The government of the Democratic Republic of Congo declared an outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever, a rare and deadly disease, on Tuesday, the World Health Organization reported. The declaration came after laboratory results confirmed two cases of the disease in the province of Bikoro in the northwestern part of the country.

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