Hot Topics: Public Health

Blog Posts (174)

December 11, 2018

BioethicsTV (December 3-5): #TheGoodDoctor, #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, PhD

Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 10): Epidemic & Virtue Ethics; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 9): Not following patient wishes

The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 10): Epidemic & Virtue Ethics

This episode revolves around an unidentified pathogen invading the ED when two patients are brought in immediately after their flight from Malaysia lands.…

November 27, 2018

Open Letter to Trump, Whitaker and Nielsen: Give safe passage to legal asylum seekers

“A group of ethicists, public health and health policy experts, healthcare providers, and lawyers has composed an open letter to President Donald J.
November 26, 2018

Aligning Research Priorities to Improve Equity: A Challenge for Health Funders

This post can also be found as the November 2018 editorial in the American Journal of Bioethics

by Alonzo L.

November 15, 2018

#InMyLane: Gun Violence and an Ethical Health Care Response

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Since January 1, 2018 through November 15, the United States has seen 311 mass shootings that have killed 339 people and injured 1,249.…

October 22, 2018

The One Health Approach to Zoonotic Emerging Infectious Diseases

The following post can also be found in the October 2018
issue of the American Journal of Bioethics.

by Ariadne Nichol and David Magnus, Ph.D.

August 24, 2018

Immigrant Health and the Moral Scandal of the “Public Charge” Rule

A long-anticipated policy change proposed by the Trump administration that would count the use of many federally-subsidized programs against immigrants currently eligible to use them threatens public health and would undermine ethical practice in health professions and systems. The policy would expand the definition of a public charge, someone likely to become dependent on government… Read more

The post Immigrant Health and the Moral Scandal of the “Public Charge” Rule appeared first on The Hastings Center.

July 24, 2018

Newspaper Op-Eds Should Disclose Authors’ Industry Ties

Earlier this month, The Seattle Times published an op-ed by Samuel Browd, medical director of Seattle Children’s Sport Concussion Program, on the risks of brain injury in youth sports. Dr. Browd acknowledged troubling research on the dangers of repetitive brain trauma, but also emphasized that millions of children “have played contact sports without overt symptoms” and… Read more

The post Newspaper Op-Eds Should Disclose Authors’ Industry Ties appeared first on The Hastings Center.

July 1, 2018

Confusion and Conscientious Objection in Arizona

by Steven H. Miles, MD and Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

Nicole Mone Arteaga was trying to get pregnant. It had been difficult for her.…

June 26, 2018

Welcome to the 2018 HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Fellows!

The Fordham University HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) is pleased to announce that the following individuals have been selected as 2018 Fellows: The Fordham University  HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI), now in its 8th year, is a training grant sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) (R25 DA031608-08), Principal Investigator, […]
June 19, 2018

Child abuse as immigration policy: has America lost its moral compass?

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

The President of the United States, after discussion with key aides in the White House, implemented a policy in June of 2018 allegedly aimed at discouraging illegal border crossings by asylum seekers and others from entering the United States.…

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Published Articles (56)

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 9 Issue 3 - Nov 2018

Freezing fertility or freezing false hope? A content analysis of social egg freezing in U.S. print media Lisa Campo-Engelstein, Rohia Aziz, Shilpa Darivemula, Jennifer Raffaele, Rajani Bhatia & Wendy M. Parker

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 10 - Oct 2018

The One Health Approach to Zoonotic Emerging Infectious Diseases Ariadne Nichol & David Magnus

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 10 - Oct 2018

A Radical Approach to Ebola: Saving Humans and Other Animals Sarah J. L. Edwards, Charles H. Norell, Phyllis Illari, Brendan Clarke & Carolyn P. Neuhaus

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 3 - Mar 2018

Ethical Dilemmas in Protecting Susceptible Subpopulations From Environmental Health Risks: Liberty, Utility, Fairness, and Accountability for Reasonableness David B. Resnik, D. Robert MacDougall & Elise M. Smith

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 4 - Dec 2017

Counseling parents at risk of delivery of an extremely premature infant: Differing strategies Marlyse F. Haward, Annie Janvier, John M. Lorenz & Baruch Fischhoff

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 4 - Dec 2017

How should we deal with misattributed paternity? A survey of lay public attitudes Georgia Lowe, Jonathan Pugh, Guy Kahane, Louise Corben, Sharon Lewis, Martin Delatycki & Julian Savulescu

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 10 - Oct 2017

Saving Life, Limb, and Eyesight: Assessing the Medical Rules of Eligibility During Armed Conflict Michael L. Gross

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

Now is the Time for a Postracial Medicine: Biomedical Research, the National Institutes of Health, and the Perpetuation of Scientific Racism Javier Perez-Rodriguez & Alejandro de la Fuente

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

A Bridge Back to the Future: Public Health Ethics, Bioethics, and Environmental Ethics Lisa M. Lee

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 9 - Sep 2017

We Can and Must Rebuild the Bridges of Interdisciplinary Bioethics Darryl R. J. Macer

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News (676)

December 11, 2018 9:15 am

The CRISPR Baby Scandal Gets Worse by the Day (The Atlantic)

Before last week, few people had heard the name He Jiankui. But on November 25, the young Chinese researcher became the center of a global firestorm when it emerged that he had allegedly made the first crispr-edited babies, twin girls named Lulu and Nana. Antonio Regalado broke the story for MIT Technology Review, and He himself described the experiment at an international gene-editing summit in Hong Kong. After his talk, He revealed that another early pregnancy is under way.

It is still unclear if He did what he claims to have done. Nonetheless, the reaction was swift and negative. The crispr pioneer Jennifer Doudna says she was “horrified,” NIH Director Francis Collins said the experiment was “profoundly disturbing,” and even Julian Savulescu, an ethicist who has described gene-editing research as “a moral necessity,” described He’s work as “monstrous.”

December 9, 2018 12:47 pm

Why Are Scientists So Upset About the First Crispr Babies? (The New York Times)

A Chinese scientist recently claimed he had produced the world’s first gene-edited babies, setting off a global firestorm. If true — the scientist has not yet published data that would confirm it — his actions would be a sensational breach of international scientific conventions. Although gene editing holds promise to potentially correct dangerous disease-causing mutations and treat some medical conditions, there are many safety and ethical concerns about editing human embryos.

Here are answers to some of the numerous questions swirling around this development.

December 6, 2018 4:15 pm

Should We Edit the Human Germline? Is Consensus Possible or Even Desirable? (The Hastings Center)

On the one hand, reports of a rogue scientist, He Jiankui, who contravened the scientific and ethical norms that should guide the development of human genome editing reinforces the need for clarity about those norms and international monitoring of advances in the field. On the other hand, it shows the weaknesses and limitations of voluntary efforts – like the summit – to guide scientists’ practices. They lack any real enforcement power on their own, and have largely served to ensure that human genome editing research can continue, rather than promote reflection on whether we should edit the human germline in the first place.

December 6, 2018 9:00 am

If you’re single with cancer, you may get less aggressive treatment than a married person (The Washington Post)

If you are divorced, widowed or never married and develop cancer, watch out. You may get less aggressive treatment than your married friends.

We’ve often heard about studies showing that married adults are more likely to survive cancer than singles. But buried in those same studies is another finding that hasn’t made the headlines. When surgery or radiotherapy is the treatment of choice, patients with spouses are more likely to get it.

December 5, 2018 9:15 am

Genetically Modified People Are Walking Among Us (The New York Times)

It felt as if humanity had crossed an important line: In China, a scientist named He Jiankui announced on Monday that twins had been born in November with a gene that he had edited when they were embryos.

But in some ways this news is not new at all. A few genetically modified people already walk among us.

December 4, 2018 9:15 am

‘From Nothing to Gangbusters’: A Treatment for Sickle-Cell Disease Proves Effective in Africa (The New York Times)

A drug that protects children in wealthy countries against painful and sometimes lethal bouts of sickle-cell disease has been proven safe for use in Africa, where the condition is far more common, scientists reported on Saturday.

More research remains to be done, experts said, but knowing that hydroxyurea — a cheap, effective and easy-to-take pill — can safely be given to African children may save millions of youngsters from agonizing pain and early deaths.

“I think this is going to be amazing,” said Dr. Ifeyinwa Osunkwo, who directs a sickle-cell disease program in Charlotte, N.C., but was not involved in the new study.

December 2, 2018 9:00 am

Battle Against Ebola in Congo Pits Medical Hope Against Local Chaos (The New York Times)

A vaccine and new treatments are on hand, but the outbreak is in an area rife with unpredictable gunfire, bandits and suspicion of outsiders.

December 1, 2018 9:00 am

This high school was rocked by an HIV scare 10 years ago (The Washington Post)

Ten years ago, Jennifer Wyms was a 17-year-old junior at Normandy High School in Wellston, Mo. She was the captain of her school’s hip-hop dance team and enjoyed going to the mall with friends. But when a health scare engulfed her St. Louis community, it cast a shadow on her high school experience.

A letter from school officials sent to parents and guardians in October 2008 relayed the news that epidemiologists with the St. Louis County Department of Health had grounds to believe that HIV may have been transmitted among some students — as many as 50 students at Normandy High School could have been exposed, it said.

“Everybody wanted to know, who had it? Where it came from? Why our school?” Wyms told The Washington Post.

November 30, 2018 3:15 pm

Dangerous Infection Tied To Hospitals Now Becoming Common Outside Them (NPR)

Named from the Greek kloster, for spindle, a class of bacteria known as Clostridia abounds in nature.

Staining deep violet under the microscope, they appear as slender rods with a bulge at one end, like a tadpole or maple seed. They thrive in soil, marine sediments and humans. They live on our skin and in our intestines.

And sometimes, they can kill you.

November 30, 2018 9:00 am

‘Landmark study’ shows brain cells revamp their DNA, perhaps sparking Alzheimer’s disease (Science)

Unlike most cells in our bodies, the neurons in our brain can scramble their genes, scientists have discovered. This genome tampering may expand the brain’s protein repertoire, but it may also promote Alzheimer’s disease, their study suggests.

“It’s potentially one of the biggest discoveries in molecular biology in years,” says Geoffrey Faulkner, a molecular biologist at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, who wasn’t connected to the research. “It is a landmark study,” agrees clinical neurologist Christos Proukakis of University College London.

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