Hot Topics: Research Ethics

Blog Posts (66)

January 10, 2017

Be Wary What You Research: You Might Get Sued

by Craig M. Klugman, Ph.D.

Peter Cohen, Clayton Bloszies, Caleb Yee and Roy Gerona published an article in the journal Drug Testing and Analysis in April 2015 explaining the results of their testing of supplements.…

December 19, 2016

BioethicsTV: Pure Genius Proudly Ignores the Rules

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“We’re Bunker Hill, since when do we follow the rules” sums up the attitude of this poor-performing medical drama that kicks ethics, law, and regulation to the curb on a weekly basis.…

November 9, 2016

Bioethics faces a rocky but navigable road

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

Academic bioethics has never been popular with Republicans.  Libertarians dislike academic bioethics because it seems too elitist and anti-free market. …

October 31, 2016

Bioethics.net: The Presidential Election Edition

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Every four years the United States chooses a new chief executive. Although encoded in the Constitution, the idea that a person with such power would willingly surrender it and walk away to allow another to lead is remarkable.…

October 14, 2016

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: October 14, 2016

Health Care and Bioethics DNA database highlights need for new medical privacy protections Creation of a national repository of genetic information is seen by some as crucial to reducing medical costs and improving people’s healthcare. ‘Big data’ could mean big … Continue reading
September 9, 2016

Medical Training for Transgender Patients Needs to Include Sensitivity to Social Stigmas for both Gender and Sexual Orientation

The recently published article on doctor’s lack of expertise in treating transgender patients in The Guardian is an important step forward in highlighting current disparities in healthcare services for this population.  The study, based on interviews with sample of 23 physicians and … Continue reading
September 8, 2016

Fordham RETI Fellow Addresses Stigma for HIV-Positive Gay and Bisexual Men

The minority stress theory suggests that health disparities experienced by gay and bisexual men (GBM) and other sexual minorities can be explained in terms of stigma-related stressors such as discrimination at work, school, religious institutions, communities and families. The unique … Continue reading
August 30, 2016

Will Research on 10,000 New Yorkers Fuel Future Racial Health Inequality?

By Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D. A 20-year, multi-million dollar study of more than 10,000 New Yorkers scheduled to begin next year claims that it will enable the development of theories, therapeutics, and policies to improve the health and quality of … Continue reading
August 17, 2016

Weeding Out the Truth: DEA’s New Stance on Marijuana Largely the Same as the Old

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

According to the Department of Justice, marijuana offenses account for 12.5% of all people in federal prisons for drug offenses.…

August 15, 2016

Get the Public Involved in Chimera Research at NIH

by Carolyn Plunkett Neuhaus, Ph.D.

NIH is seeking public comment on a new policy regarding chimeras. From the Greek word for a fire-breathing animal with a lion’s head, a goat’s body, and a snake’s tail, “chimera” in this context means a non-human organism that has human components – such as human tissues or organs.…

View More Blog Entries

Published Articles (188)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 10 - Oct 2016

Healing Without Waging War: Beyond Military Metaphors in Medicine and HIV Cure Research Jing-Bao Nie, Adam Gilbertson, Malcolm de Roubaix, Ciara Staunton, Anton van Niekerk, Joseph D. Tucker & Stuart Rennie

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 7 Issue 2 - Apr 2016

The Arts and Sciences of Reading: Humanities in The Laboratory Lindsey Grubbs

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 7 Issue 2 - Apr 2016

The Relevance and Context of Research Laura Otis

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 7 Issue 3 - Jul 2016

Ethical challenges in designing and implementing health systems research: Experiences from the field Adnan Hyder & Carleigh Krubiner

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 7 Issue 3 - Jul 2016

Promoting equity through health systems research in low- and middle-income countries: Practices of researchers Bridget Pratt, Katharine A. Allen & Adnan A. Hyder

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 7 Issue 3 - Jul 2016

Does promoting research advance planning in a general elderly population enhance completion of a research directive and proxies' predictive ability? a randomized controlled trial Gina Bravo, Lise Trottier, Marie-France Dubois, Marcel Arcand, Danièle Blanchette, Anne-Marie Boire-Lavigne, Maryse Guay, Paule Hottin, Julie Lane, Suzanne Bellemare & Karen Painter

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 7 Issue 3 - Jul 2016

Clarifying ethical responsibilities in pediatric biobanking Merle Spriggs & Craig L. Fry

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 7 Issue 3 - Jul 2016

Lay attitudes toward trust, uncertainty, and the return of pediatric research results in biobanking John Lynch, Janelle Hines, Sarah Theodore & Monica Mitchell

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 8 - Aug 2016

IRB and Research Regulatory Delays Within the Military Health System: Do They Really Matter? And If So, Why and for Whom? Michael C. Freed, Laura A. Novak, William D. S. Killgore, Sheila A. M. Rauch, Tracey P. Koehlmoos, J. P. Ginsberg, Janice L. Krupnick, Albert "Skip" Rizzo, Anne Andrews & Charles C. Engel

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 6 - Jun 2016

Clinical Trials Infrastructure as a Quality Improvement Intervention in Low- and Middle-Income Countries Avram Denburg, Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo & Steven Joffe

View More Articles

News (383)

January 12, 2017 9:00 am

Thanks to AI, Computers Can Now See Your Health Problems (Wired)

Face2Gene takes advantage of the fact that so many genetic conditions have a tell-tale “face”—a unique constellation of features that can provide clues to a potential diagnosis. It is just one of several new technologies taking advantage of how quickly modern computers can analyze, sort, and find patterns across huge reams of data.

January 5, 2017 9:00 am

After Backlash, Including From Trump, House GOP Drops Weakening Of Ethics Office (NPR)

House Republicans have reversed themselves and restored the current rules of the Office of Congressional Ethics

December 21, 2016 9:00 am

Update: Surprise! Innovation bill clears House, heads to president (Science)

“This bill maximizes the nation’s investment in basic research, and helps boost U.S. competitiveness, creates jobs and spurs new business and industries”

November 17, 2016 9:00 am

CRISPR gene-editing tested in a person for the first time (Nature)

A Chinese group has become the first to inject a person with cells that contain genes edited using the revolutionary CRISPR–Cas9 technique.

November 2, 2016 8:00 am

Male Birth Control Injections Found Effective, But Study Cut Short Due to Side-Effects (US News)

New research published Thursday in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolismshows hormonal birth control injections for men could be effective. But don’t expect to see them on the market anytime soon. The study was cut short due to side effects including depression, mood changes and libido issues – in short, side effects similar to those experienced by women who take hormone-based birth control.

November 2, 2016 8:00 am

Publisher pulls 58 articles by Iranian scientists over authorship manipulation (Nature)

A tranche of 58 articles authored by 282 Iran-based researchers were retracted today by a leading scientific publisher, which said it had found signs that the peer review and publication processes had been compromised.

October 4, 2016 8:00 am

Are Swedish Designer Babies Coming Soon? (Seeker)

A Swedish medical researcher has taken another step toward eventually being able to engineer a custom-made human being. The experiment, first reported on NPR Thursday involves editing the genes of a developing human embryo.

September 15, 2016 8:00 am

Stop ignoring misconduct (Nature)

The history of science shows that irreproducibility is not a product of our times. Some 350 years ago, the chemist Robert Boyle penned essays on “the unsuccessfulness of experiments”. He warned readers to be sceptical of reported work. “You will meet with several Observations and Experiments, which … may upon further tryal disappoint your expectation.” He attributed the problem to a ‘lack of skill in the scientist and the lack of purity of the ingredients’, and what would today be referred to as inadequate statistical power.

September 14, 2016 8:00 am

How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame to Fat (NY Times)

The sugar industry paid scientists in the 1960s to play down the link between sugar and heart disease and promote saturated fat as the culprit instead, newly released historical documents show.

September 9, 2016 8:00 am

Another scathing report causes more eminent heads to roll in the Macchiarini scandal (Science)

The scandal surrounding Paolo Macchiarini, the former star surgeon who became famous for his pioneering trachea transplants, has prompted yet another round of resignations and firings at the highest levels of Swedish higher education. On Monday evening, Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research Helene Hellmark Knutsson said she had dismissed the country’s chancellor in charge of all public universities, Harriet Wallberg-Henriksson, following the release of a sharply critical report by an independent commission that examined the Karolinska Institute’s (KI’s) hiring and management of Macchiarini. Wallberg-Henriksson was vice-chancellor of KI in Stockholm, a position comparable to that of a university president, when Macchiarini was hired, and played a key role in his recruitment.

View More News Items