Hot Topics: Research Ethics

Blog Posts (74)

May 23, 2017

Dear Mr. President: It’s Time for Your Bioethics Commission

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week, seven Democratic members of the U.S. House Representatives sent a letter to the White House asking President Trump to appoint a director to the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), position that normally serves as the presidential science advisor.…

April 24, 2017

BioethicsTV: Henrietta Lacks and “Mary Kills People”

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

This past weekend was a bioethics bonanza when it came to cable television. First, HBO premiered its film version of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, seven years after the book’s original publication.…

February 21, 2017

User Beware: Privacy Settings just a Facade

By Brenda Curtis, Ph.D. Social media platforms continue to improve and refine their privacy settings as the demand for advanced user protections increases. Although enabling catered privacy settings to online profiles allows users to indicate who they would like share personal information with, it does not necessarily protect them from the platforms – i.e. websites … More User Beware: Privacy Settings just a Facade
February 21, 2017

Studying “Friends”: The Ethics of Using Social Media as Research Platforms

by Sandra Soo-Jin Lee, Ph.D.

Social media is increasingly creating the contours of many Americans’ daily lives as a medium that is simultaneously intimate and powerfully public.…

February 16, 2017

The 2017 Common Rule and the Clinical Ethics of Prolixity

by Steven H. Miles, MD

Bioethicist Steven Miles suggest that making the new Common Rules regulations easy to read is as important as the content

The new Common Rule to protect human subjects has an extraordinarily large and diverse audience.…

January 19, 2017

New Common Rule Regs Mean New Training for IRB Members

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Yesterday, the Department of Health & Human Services released the long-awaited, and debated, new Common Rule.…

January 19, 2017

Peer Reviewing: Paying it Forward

by Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD and Bela Fishbeyn, MS

As an associate editor and executive editor of the American Journal of Bioethics, we identify and recruit peer reviewers to review manuscripts that have been submitted for publication.…

January 17, 2017

‘Goodness of Fit Ethics’ to Promote Health Research for LGBT Youth

This past November, Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R), a non-profit organization dedicated to the study and advancement of the highest ethical standards in the conduct of research, held its annual Advancing Ethical Research (AER) Conference featuring Dr. Celia B. Fisher, Director of the Center for Ethics Education and HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute … More ‘Goodness of Fit Ethics’ to Promote Health Research for LGBT Youth
January 10, 2017

Be Wary What You Research: You Might Get Sued

by Craig M. Klugman, Ph.D.

Peter Cohen, Clayton Bloszies, Caleb Yee and Roy Gerona published an article in the journal Drug Testing and Analysis in April 2015 explaining the results of their testing of supplements.…

December 19, 2016

BioethicsTV: Pure Genius Proudly Ignores the Rules

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“We’re Bunker Hill, since when do we follow the rules” sums up the attitude of this poor-performing medical drama that kicks ethics, law, and regulation to the curb on a weekly basis.…

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Published Articles (195)

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

Primary care physicians' views about gatekeeping in clinical research recruitment: A qualitative study Marilys Guillemin, Rosalind McDougall, Dominique Martin, Nina Hallowell, Alison Brookes & Lynn Gillam

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

Healthy individuals' perspectives on clinical research protocols and influences on enrollment decisions Laura Weiss Roberts & Jane Paik Kim

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

Qualitative study of participants' perceptions and preferences regarding research dissemination Rachel S. Purvis, Traci H. Abraham, Christopher R. Long, M. Kathryn Stewart, T. Scott Warmack & Pearl Anna McElfish

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 3 - Mar 2017

Using Social Media as a Research Recruitment Tool: Ethical Issues and Recommendations Luke Gelinas, Robin Pierce, Sabune Winkler, I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch & Barbara E. Bierer

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 3 - Mar 2017

Studying “Friends”: The Ethics of Using Social Media as Research Platforms Sandra Soo-Jin Lee

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

When are primary care physicians untruthful with patients? A qualitative study Stephanie R. Morain, Lisa I. Iezzoni, Michelle M. Mello, Elyse R. Park, Joshua P. Metlay, Gabrielle Horner & Eric G. Campbell

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

How are PCORI-funded researchers engaging patients in research and what are the ethical implications? Lauren E. Ellis MA, PhD & Nancy E. Kass

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 10 - Oct 2016

Healing Without Waging War: Beyond Military Metaphors in Medicine and HIV Cure Research Jing-Bao Nie, Adam Gilbertson, Malcolm de Roubaix, Ciara Staunton, Anton van Niekerk, Joseph D. Tucker & Stuart Rennie

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 7 Issue 2 - Apr 2016

The Arts and Sciences of Reading: Humanities in The Laboratory Lindsey Grubbs

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 7 Issue 2 - Apr 2016

The Relevance and Context of Research Laura Otis

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News (401)

June 16, 2017 9:00 am

Biologists debate how to license preprints (Nature)

Biology’s zeal for preprints — papers posted online before peer review — is opening up a thorny legal debate: should scientists license their manuscripts on open-access terms? Researchers have now shared more than 11,000 papers at the popular bioRxiv preprints site. But where some researchers allow their bioRxiv manuscripts to be freely redistributed and reused, others have chosen to lock them down with restrictive terms.

May 29, 2017 9:00 am

House science panel joins Trump in questioning research overhead payments (Science)

A hearing on how the U.S. government defrays the cost of doing federally funded research on college campuses might put most people to sleep. But when budgets are tight, the billions of dollars being spent each year on so-called overhead become an irresistible target for lawmakers. This past Wednesday, the science committee of the U.S. House of Representatives weighed in on the subject, one that is at the core of the U.S. research enterprise but also exceedingly complicated. The hearing gave Republicans an opportunity to voice support for lowering overhead payments, which cover things like electricity, lab maintenance, regulatory compliance, and administration.

May 25, 2017 9:00 am

Fixing the tomato: CRISPR edits correct plant-breeding snafu (Nature)

From their giant fruits to compact plant size, today’s tomatoes have been sculpted by thousands of years of breeding. But mutations linked to prized traits — including one that made them easier to harvest — yield an undesirable plant when combined, geneticists have foundIt is a rare example of a gene harnessed during domestication that later hampered crop improvement efforts, says geneticist Zachary Lippman of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York. After identifying the mutations, he and his colleagues used CRISPR gene editing to engineer more productive plants — a strategy that plant breeders are eager to adopt.

May 12, 2017 9:00 am

Integrity starts with the health of research groups (Nature)

Last month, the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine published a report called Fostering Integrity in Research. Later this month, the 5th World Conference on Research Integrity will be held in Amsterdam. Over the years, universities have followed some funders’ mandates to improve the prevention and investigation of misconduct. Many discussions have been held about unreliable research. None of these initiatives pays sufficient attention to a specific issue: the research health of research groups and the people who lead them. This includes technical robustness of lab practices, assurance of ethical integrity and the psychological health and well-being of group members.

May 3, 2017 9:00 am

Psychedelic compound in ecstasy moves closer to approval to treat PTSD (Nature)

Psychologists have occasionally given people psychedelic drugs such as LSD or magic mushrooms to induce altered states, in an attempt to treat mental illness. Today, many of those drugs are illegal, but if clinical trials testing their efficacy yield positive results, a handful could become prescription medicines in the next decade. The furthest along in this process is MDMA — a drug sold illegally as ecstasy or Molly — which is showing promise in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

April 21, 2017 9:00 am

Young human blood makes old mice smarter (Nature)

Blood from younger humans may have similar rejuvenating effects on older animals as blood from young mice.

March 30, 2017 9:00 am

Gates Foundation announces open-access publishing venture (Nature)

One of the world’s wealthiest charities, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle, Washington, is set to launch its own open-access publishing venture later this year. The initiative, Gates Open Research, was announced on 23 March and will be modelled on a service begun last year by the London-based biomedical charity, the Wellcome Trust. Like that effort, the Gates Foundation’s platform is intended to accelerate the publication of articles and data from research funded by the charity.

March 24, 2017 9:00 am

World’s first full-body PET scanner could aid drug development, monitor environmental toxins (Science)

Researchers are working to build the world’s first full-body PET scanner, which they claim will increase our power to understand what’s going on in our bodies through more vivid PET images and the opportunity to examine how the whole body responds to drugs and toxins.

March 14, 2017 9:00 am

Scientists Closer To Creating A Fully Synthetic Yeast Genome (NPR)

Scientists have taken another important step toward creating different types of synthetic life in the laboratory. An international research consortium reports Thursday that it has figured out an efficient method for synthesizing a substantial part of the genetic code of yeast.

February 24, 2017 9:00 am

The Birth of CRISPR Inc (Science)

As the science grew even more compelling and venture capital (VC) beckoned, the jockeying to start CRISPR companies became intense. The research community was rent apart by concerns about intellectual property, academic credit, Nobel Prize dreams, geography, media coverage, egos, personal profit, and loyalty. A billion dollars poured into what might be called CRISPR Inc.

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