Hot Topics: Research Ethics

Blog Posts (110)

September 27, 2018

Europe is Pounding on the Paywalls of Research Publishing—Will USA Join Forces?

by Katrina A. Bramstedt, PhD

The 2015 headline was startling: “[US] Taxpayers spend $140 billion funding science each year — but can’t access many of the results.” In fact, gaining access to research results is costing universities and government organizations in the US $10 billion per year.…

August 31, 2018

On Protecting the Agency of Undocumented Immigrants from Patterns of Our Past

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN ETHICS PRIZE HONORABLE MENTION By Elizabeth Doty In the history of the United States rhetoric alienating immigrants, documented and undocumented, has consistently pervaded everyday life across the nation, from the front page of The New York Times to college campuses to airports to Congressional hearings to, indeed, even research. While I […]
June 26, 2018

Welcome to the 2018 HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Fellows!

The Fordham University HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) is pleased to announce that the following individuals have been selected as 2018 Fellows: The Fordham University  HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI), now in its 8th year, is a training grant sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) (R25 DA031608-08), Principal Investigator, […]
June 6, 2018

The Trumpification of Research Ethics: It’s Now OK to Use Prisoners as Guinea Pigs

By Celia Fisher, PhD Fordham University Federal regulations prohibiting scientists from using prisoners to study health problems not directly related to the causes and conditions of their incarceration are now threatened by the same morally ambiguous forces undermining other U.S. regulations designed to protect the public.  As reported in The New York Times, to resolve scientific […]
June 6, 2018

The Trumpification of Research Ethics: It’s Now OK to Use Prisoners as Guinea Pigs

By Celia Fisher, PhD Fordham University Federal regulations prohibiting scientists from using prisoners to study health problems not directly related to the causes and conditions of their incarceration are now threatened by the same morally ambiguous forces undermining other U.S. regulations designed to protect the public.  As reported in The New York Times, to resolve scientific […]
May 17, 2018

Big Data Studies and Abuse of Fiduciary Duties

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

A study published in the May 17th, 2018 issue of Cell, “Disease Heritability Inferred from Familial Relationships Reported in Medical Records,” shows a connection between families and certain diseases at three large urban university medical centers.…

May 16, 2018

The Homeless as Human Subjects

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN ETHICS PRIZE FIRST-PLACE WINNER By Sarah Reis During my senior year of high school, on a bitter Saturday morning in January, I found myself at the entrance to the Boston Common assisting other volunteers from the Sock Exchange charity in organizing food and clothing for distribution to the homeless of the […]
April 25, 2018

Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher on Patient-Provider Communications with Gay Teens

Fordham University’s Celia Fisher, PhD was the Principal Investigator on a recently completed quantitative study that resulted in a paper published in the journal AIDS and Behavior titled “Patient-Provider Communication Barriers and Facilitators to HIV and STI Preventive Services for Adolescent MSM.” The purpose of this study was to explore adolescent men who have sex with men (AMSM) […]
April 8, 2018

Building a Trustworthy Precision Health Research Enterprise

This editorial also appears in the April 2018 edition of the American Journal of Bioethics

by David Magnus, PhD and Jason N.

April 8, 2018

Artist’s Blurb- April AJOB Cover

by Natalie Yoshioka, BA
I spent the most time trying to find an exciting visual metaphor that would best represent the recommendation of building trust within a community over an extended period of time.…

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Published Articles (216)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 4 - Apr 2018

Beyond Consent: Building Trusting Relationships With Diverse Populations in Precision Medicine Research Stephanie A. Kraft, Mildred K. Cho, Katherine Gillespie, Meghan Halley, Nina Varsava, Kelly E. Ormond, Harold S. Luft, Benjamin S. Wilfond & Sandra Soo-Jin Lee

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 4 - Apr 2018

Building a Trustworthy Precision Health Research Enterprise David Magnus & Jason N. Batten

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

Understanding variations in secondary findings reporting practices across U.S. genome sequencing laboratories Sara L. Ackerman PhD, MPH & Barbara A. Koenig

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

A paradigm for understanding trust and mistrust in medical research: The Community VOICES study M. Smirnoff, I. Wilets, D. F. Ragin, R. Adams, J. Holohan, R. Rhodes, G. Winkel, E. M. Ricci, C. Clesca & L. D. Richardson

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

Would you be willing to zap your child's brain? Public perspectives on parental responsibilities and the ethics of enhancing children with transcranial direct current stimulation Katy Wagner, Hannah Maslen, Justin Oakley & Julian Savulescu

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Mar 2018

Children's perspectives on the benefits and burdens of research participation Claudia Barned, Jennifer Dobson, Alain Stintzi, David Mack & Kieran C. O'Doherty

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jan 2018

The Emergence of Clinical Research Ethics Consultation: Insights From a National Collaborative Kathryn M. Porter, Marion Danis, Holly A. Taylor, Mildred K. Cho, Benjamin S. Wilfond & on behalf of the Clinical Research Ethics Consultation Collaborative Repository Group

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 12 - Dec 2017

Our Life Depends on This Drug: Competence, Inequity, and Voluntary Consent in Clinical Trials on Supervised Injectable Opioid Assisted Treatment Daniel Steel, Kirsten Marchand & Eugenia Oviedo-Joekes

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 12 - Dec 2017

Reframing Consent for Clinical Research: A Function-Based Approach Neal W. Dickert, Nir Eyal, Sara F. Goldkind, Christine Grady, Steven Joffe, Bernard Lo, Franklin G. Miller, Rebecca D. Pentz, Robert Silbergleit, Kevin P. Weinfurt, David Wendler & Scott Y. H. Kim

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 12 - Dec 2017

The Idea of a “Standard View” of Informed Consent Tom L. Beauchamp

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News (436)

October 2, 2018 9:00 am

Biologists irate at NSF’s new one-proposal cap (Science)

Last month, NSF’s biology directorate announced that researchers could submit only one proposal a year in which they are listed as a principal investigator (PI) or co-PI. The cap applies only to the directorate’s three core tracks and excludes several other NSF programs from which many biologists receive support… But 70 scientists have signed onto a letter asking the agency to reconsider the new policy, which they also complain was adopted without any community input.

September 27, 2018 1:47 pm

Health And Human Services Says It's Reviewing Use Of Fetal Tissue For Research (NPR)

The Department of Health and Human Services says it is reviewing all medical research involving human fetal tissue. HHS said this week that it will conduct an audit of “all acquisitions involving human fetal tissue” as well as “all research involving fetal tissue…”

September 27, 2018 1:44 pm

Gene editing could eliminate mosquitoes, but is it a good idea? (CNN)

Researchers used a gene editing tool, CRISPR, to wipe out a population of malaria-carrying mosquitoes in the lab. Questions remain about how releasing this technology into the wild would impact the environment.

September 20, 2018 9:00 am

Here’s what we know about CRISPR safety – and reports of ‘genome vandalism’ (The Washington Post)

Using genome editing to treat human diseases is very tantalizing. Correcting inherited genetic defects that cause human disease — just as one edits a sentence — is the obvious application. This strategy has been successful in tests on animals. But a few recent scientific papers suggest that CRISPR is not without its problems. The research reveals that CRISPR can damage DNA located far from the target DNA we are trying to correct.

September 10, 2018 6:00 am

Statement on Protecting the Integrity of U.S. Biomedical Research (NIH.gov)

We have long understood, however, that the robustness of the biomedical research enterprise is under constant threat by risks to the security of intellectual property and the integrity of peer review.  This knowledge has shaped our existing policies and practices, but these risks are increasing.

September 6, 2018 1:37 am

Blood-Testing Firm Theranos to Dissolve (The Wall Street Journal)

Theranos Inc., the blood-testing company accused of perpetrating Silicon Valley’s biggest fraud, will soon cease to exist.

September 6, 2018 1:32 am

Scientists Are Retooling Bacteria to Cure Disease (The New York Times)

In a study carried out over the summer, a group of volunteers drank a white, peppermint-ish concoction laced with billions of bacteria. The microbes had been engineered to break down a naturally occurring toxin in the blood. The vast majority of us can do this without any help. But for those who cannot, these microbes may someday become a living medicine.

July 31, 2018 3:00 am

Experimental Alzheimer's drug stirs hope after early trials (CNN)

After a series of prominent failures, there’s reason to be hopeful in the search for a drug to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Results of an early trial of an experimental drug showed that it improved cognition and reduced clinical signs of Alzheimer’s in the brains of study participants, and experts are “cautiously optimistic” that the results will be duplicated in future clinical trials.

July 16, 2018 3:04 am

Drug to Treat Smallpox Approved by F.D.A., a Move Against Bioterrorism (The New York Times)

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved the first drug intended to treat smallpox — a move that could halt a lethal pandemic if the virus were to be released as a terrorist bioweapon or through a laboratory accident.

July 10, 2018 3:00 am

Iceland's ethical debate: Should DNA donors be told if they are predisposed to a deadly disease? (CBC Radio)

If you knew someone was genetically predisposed to cancer, would you tell them? Dr. Kari Stefansson would. The Icelandic neurologist is the CEO of deCODE Genetics, a company that has collected the DNA of nearly half the country’s population. Using the company’s data, he said that he can pinpoint 1,600 people at risk of deadly cancers in Iceland. The government, however, won’t let him.

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