Hot Topics: Research Ethics

Blog Posts (95)

December 8, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: December 8, 2017

Technology Ethics Artificial Intelligence Seeks An Ethical Conscience “Leading artificial intelligence researchers gathered this week for the prestigious Neural Information Processing Systems conference have a new topic on their agenda. Alongside the usual cutting-edge research, panel discussions, and socializing: concern about AI’s power. Four ethical priorities for neurotechnologies and AI “Artificial intelligence and brain–computer interfaces must … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: December 8, 2017
December 6, 2017

Dangerous Ethics Oversight in Purdue Child Nutritional Study: Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher Weighs In

This past July. an $8.8 million dollar, camp-like nutrition study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) was shut down, resulting in a vast internal investigation at Purdue University, one of the nation’s top research institutions, and raising several issues about research ethics and the role of institutional review boards (IRBs), according to Undark. … More Dangerous Ethics Oversight in Purdue Child Nutritional Study: Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher Weighs In
December 4, 2017

The Idea of a “Standard View” of Informed Consent

This editorial is re-posted from the December 2017 issue of the American Journal of Bioethics. You can read more on this topic through the target article and open peer commentaries

December 1, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017

World AIDS Day, December 1, 2017 National Aids Trust (NAT) “World AIDS Day takes place on the 1st December each year. It’s an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, to show support for people living with HIV, and to commemorate those who have died from an AIDS-related illness. Founded in … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017
December 1, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017

World AIDS Day, December 1, 2017 National Aids Trust (NAT) “World AIDS Day takes place on the 1st December each year. It’s an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, to show support for people living with HIV, and to commemorate those who have died from an AIDS-related illness. Founded in … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017
November 21, 2017

Attica Leprosy Study: Ethical Issues In What Little We Know

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

We are indebted to the inmates of the Attica Correctional Facility who participated in this study and to the warden and his administration for their help and co-operation.

November 4, 2017

BioethicsTV (October 29-November 3): Decision-makers, Boundary Issues; Errors; and Double Effect

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Good Doctor (Season 1; Episode 6): Who Chooses; Experimental Treatment; Boundary Crossing; Hiding Errors

A bus crash carrying a wedding party leads to a mass casualty incident.…

October 24, 2017

Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher Weighs in on Researchers Using Real Guns in Study with Children in Mic

In a recent study, researchers asked children ages 8 – 12 years old to watch 20-minute clips of PG-rated movies that either included or did not include gun violence. The objective of the study was to test whether children exposed to gun violence in movie clips would 1) handle a real gun longer and 2) … More Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher Weighs in on Researchers Using Real Guns in Study with Children in Mic
October 12, 2017

Justice and Bioethics: Who Should Finance Academic Publishing?

by Udo Schuklenk (Joint Editor in Chief) & David Magnus (Editor in Chief)
We applaud Chattopadhyay, Muyser, Moxham & DeVries on their article, “A Question of Social Justice: How Policies of Profit Negate Engagement of Developing World Bioethicsts and Undermine Bioethicists” for tackling an important and often neglected topic in bioethics: the challenges that our under-resourced colleagues face in conducting research and contributing to the literature in bioethics.…

September 27, 2017

What Does Silence Say?

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE SECOND-PLACE WINNER By Amy Endres There had never once been a public opinion poll done in El Salvador until Ignacio Martín-Baró, a Jesuit, set out as the only doctoral-level psychologist in the country to measure the opinion of the people in the 1980s.[1]  He knew this would be difficult.  He … More What Does Silence Say?

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Published Articles (204)

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Sep 2017

Main outcomes of an RCT to pilot test reporting and feedback to foster research integrity climates in the VA Brian C. Martinson , David C. Mohr, Martin P. Charns, David Nelson, Emily Hagel-Campbell, Ann Bangerter, Hanna E. Bloomfield, Richard Owen & Carol R. Thrush

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Sep 2017

Physician understanding and application of surrogate decision-making laws in clinical practice Amber Rose Comer, Margaret Gaffney, Cynthia L. Stone & Alexia Torke

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Sep 2017

Improving informed consent: Stakeholder views Emily E. Anderson, Susan B. Newman & Alicia K. Matthews

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 7 - Jul 2017

The Final Rule: When the Rubber Meets the Road P. Pearl O'Rourke

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 7 - Jul 2017

Examining Provisions Related to Consent in the Revised Common Rule Jeremy Sugarman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 7 - Jul 2017

Rethinking the Belmont Report? Phoebe Friesen, Lisa Kearns, Barbara Redman & Arthur L. Caplan

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 7 - Jul 2017

A Proposed Process for Reliably Updating the Common Rule Benjamin E. Berkman, David Wendler, Haley K. Sullivan & Christine Grady

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 7 - Jul 2017

At Last! Aye, and There's the Rub Alexander M. Capron

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 7 - Jul 2017

Modernizing Research Regulations Is Not Enough: It's Time to Think Outside the Regulatory Box Suzanne M. Rivera, Kyle B. Brothers, R. Jean Cadigan, Heather L. Harrell, Mark A. Rothstein, Richard R. Sharp & Aaron J. Goldenberg

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 2 - Apr 2017

Primary care physicians' views about gatekeeping in clinical research recruitment: A qualitative study Marilys Guillemin, Rosalind McDougall, Dominique Martin, Nina Hallowell, Alison Brookes & Lynn Gillam

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News (414)

November 14, 2017 9:00 am

Lab-grown ‘minibrains’ are revealing what makes humans special (Science)

Ever since Alex Pollen was a boy talking with his neuroscientist father, he wanted to know how evolution made the human brain so special. Our brains are bigger, relative to body size, than other animals’, but it’s not just size that matters. “Elephants and whales have bigger brains,” notes Pollen, now a neuroscientist himself at the University of California, San Francisco. Comparing anatomy or even genomes of humans and other animals reveals little about the genetic and developmental changes that sent our brains down such a different path.

November 10, 2017 9:00 am

Former GSK boss to lead new UK accelerated drug access scheme (Reuters)

Former GlaxoSmithKline boss Andrew Witty is to lead a new British scheme to accelerate access to ground-breaking medicines for conditions such as cancer, dementia and diabetes from April 2018.

October 27, 2017 9:00 am

In Brazil, researchers struggle to fend off deepening budget cuts (Science)

With time and money running out, Brazilian scientists are turning up the pressure on the federal government to avoid a total collapse of the national science and technology funding system before the end of the year.

October 23, 2017 9:00 am

Rand Paul takes a poke at U.S. peer-review panels (Science)

New legislation introduced this week by Senator Rand Paul (R–KY) would fundamentally alter how grant proposals are reviewed at every federal agency by adding public members with no expertise in the research being vetted.

October 13, 2017 9:00 am

Navajo Nation reconsiders ban on genetic research (Nature)

When the Navajo Nation opens its first oncology centre next year in Tuba City, Arizona, clinicians there may be able to offer a service that has been banned on tribal lands for 15 years: analyzing the DNA of Navajo tribe members to guide treatments and study the genetic roots of disease.

October 2, 2017 9:00 am

Chinese scientists fix genetic disorder in cloned human embryos (Nature)

A team in China has taken a new approach to fixing disease genes in human embryos. The researchers created cloned embryos with a genetic mutation for a potentially fatal blood disorder, and then precisely corrected the DNA to show how the condition might be prevented at the earliest stages of development.

September 28, 2017 9:00 am

Whistleblowers at U.S. funded research institutions fear retaliation (Washington Post)

Consider the impact of the Public Health Service’s scandalous “Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male.” Patients were denied needed treatment in the name of science. Launched in 1932, it lasted 40 years and is an example of perverted research with lingering negative consequences. Now comes an investigative report about deterrents in reporting problems with human research. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Inspector General found evidence of a fear of retaliation among whistleblowers in research institutions.

August 30, 2017 9:00 am

Basic studies of how our brains work are now clinical trials, NIH says (Science)

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, has confirmed that the agency’s definition of clinical trials now includes imaging studies of normal brain function that do not test new treatments. The change will impose new requirements that many researchers say don’t make sense and could stifle cognitive neuroscience.

August 17, 2017 9:00 am

Artificial intelligence identifies plant species for science (Nature)

Computer algorithms trained on the images of thousands of preserved plants have learned to automatically identify species that have been pressed, dried and mounted on herbarium sheets, researchers report.

August 14, 2017 9:00 am

Americans are becoming more open to human genome editing, survey finds, but concerns remain (Science)

CRISPR, the powerful genome-editing tool, does a molecular tango to cut and modify DNA that is highly nuanced. The same subtlety applies to the public’s views on how best to use genome editing in humans, a new survey of adults in the United States shows.

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