Hot Topics: Research Ethics

Blog Posts (99)

February 9, 2018

Ethics and Society Newsfeed – February 9, 2018

Politics The Circumscribed Ethics Investigation into Devin Nunes “The House Intelligence Committee chair claimed he’d been completely cleared, but the panel probing his conduct never gained access to the intelligence he was accused of divulging.” Trump’s Choice For Ethics Chief Wins Praise As ‘Somebody Who Plays It By The Book’ “Emory A. Rounds III is … More Ethics and Society Newsfeed – February 9, 2018
January 25, 2018

Monkey See, Human Do: Cloning Macaque Monkeys with Fetal Cells

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

 “How afraid of human cloning should we be?”
Monkeys have been cloned, Paving the way for human cloning
Yes, They’ve Cloned Monkeys in China.

January 24, 2018

Electronic Preprints and the Ingelfinger Rule

by David B. Resnik, JD, PhD,

Since 1969, the New England Journal of Medicine has maintained a policy, known as the Ingelfinger Rule, against publishing articles which have already been published or reported to the media. …

January 12, 2018

Whose Rights are Right?: The Debate Over Animal Rights in Research

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE HONORABLE MENTION By Brianna Blunck Animal research has been conventionally practiced under the notion that it has played a vital role in scientific and medical advances, but our use of animals should not continue without periods of reflection on the morality and necessity of their use. George Yancy, PhD and … More Whose Rights are Right?: The Debate Over Animal Rights in Research
December 8, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: December 8, 2017

Technology Ethics Artificial Intelligence Seeks An Ethical Conscience “Leading artificial intelligence researchers gathered this week for the prestigious Neural Information Processing Systems conference have a new topic on their agenda. Alongside the usual cutting-edge research, panel discussions, and socializing: concern about AI’s power. Four ethical priorities for neurotechnologies and AI “Artificial intelligence and brain–computer interfaces must … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: December 8, 2017
December 6, 2017

Dangerous Ethics Oversight in Purdue Child Nutritional Study: Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher Weighs In

This past July. an $8.8 million dollar, camp-like nutrition study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) was shut down, resulting in a vast internal investigation at Purdue University, one of the nation’s top research institutions, and raising several issues about research ethics and the role of institutional review boards (IRBs), according to Undark. … More Dangerous Ethics Oversight in Purdue Child Nutritional Study: Fordham University’s Dr. Celia Fisher Weighs In
December 4, 2017

The Idea of a “Standard View” of Informed Consent

This editorial is re-posted from the December 2017 issue of the American Journal of Bioethics. You can read more on this topic through the target article and open peer commentaries

December 1, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017

World AIDS Day, December 1, 2017 National Aids Trust (NAT) “World AIDS Day takes place on the 1st December each year. It’s an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, to show support for people living with HIV, and to commemorate those who have died from an AIDS-related illness. Founded in … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017
December 1, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017

World AIDS Day, December 1, 2017 National Aids Trust (NAT) “World AIDS Day takes place on the 1st December each year. It’s an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, to show support for people living with HIV, and to commemorate those who have died from an AIDS-related illness. Founded in … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: World AIDS Day 2017
November 21, 2017

Attica Leprosy Study: Ethical Issues In What Little We Know

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

We are indebted to the inmates of the Attica Correctional Facility who participated in this study and to the warden and his administration for their help and co-operation.

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Published Articles (210)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jan 2018

The Emergence of Clinical Research Ethics Consultation: Insights From a National Collaborative Kathryn M. Porter, Marion Danis, Holly A. Taylor, Mildred K. Cho, Benjamin S. Wilfond & on behalf of the Clinical Research Ethics Consultation Collaborative Repository Group

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 12 - Dec 2017

Our Life Depends on This Drug: Competence, Inequity, and Voluntary Consent in Clinical Trials on Supervised Injectable Opioid Assisted Treatment Daniel Steel, Kirsten Marchand & Eugenia Oviedo-Joekes

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 12 - Dec 2017

Reframing Consent for Clinical Research: A Function-Based Approach Neal W. Dickert, Nir Eyal, Sara F. Goldkind, Christine Grady, Steven Joffe, Bernard Lo, Franklin G. Miller, Rebecca D. Pentz, Robert Silbergleit, Kevin P. Weinfurt, David Wendler & Scott Y. H. Kim

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 12 - Dec 2017

The Idea of a “Standard View” of Informed Consent Tom L. Beauchamp

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 4 - Dec 2017

Views of clinical trial participants on the readability and their understanding of informed consent documents Rita Somers, Cornelius Van Staden & Francois Steffens

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 4 - Dec 2017

Ethical and regulatory challenges of research using pervasive sensing and other emerging technologies: IRB perspectives Camille Nebeker, John Harlow, Rebeca Espinoza Giacinto, Rubi Orozco-Linares, Cinnamon S. Bloss & Nadir Weibel

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Sep 2017

Main outcomes of an RCT to pilot test reporting and feedback to foster research integrity climates in the VA Brian C. Martinson , David C. Mohr, Martin P. Charns, David Nelson, Emily Hagel-Campbell, Ann Bangerter, Hanna E. Bloomfield, Richard Owen & Carol R. Thrush

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Sep 2017

Physician understanding and application of surrogate decision-making laws in clinical practice Amber Rose Comer, Margaret Gaffney, Cynthia L. Stone & Alexia Torke

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Sep 2017

Improving informed consent: Stakeholder views Emily E. Anderson, Susan B. Newman & Alicia K. Matthews

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 7 - Jul 2017

The Final Rule: When the Rubber Meets the Road P. Pearl O'Rourke

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News (416)

February 7, 2018 9:00 am

Big tobacco’s offer: $1 billion for research. Should scientists take it? (Science)

Utrecht University (UU) in the Netherlands thought it had nothing to be ashamed of when it accepted a €360,000 research grant from Philip Morris International (PMI) last September. The tobacco giant had agreed to fund a study on cigarette smuggling that had obvious public health importance, and the lead researcher, law professor John Vervaele, would enjoy complete academic freedom. Sure, there had been a “thorough debate” about the grant, Vervaele said in a press release, “but the tobacco industry is not illegal. The illicit tobacco trade is.”

December 26, 2017 9:00 am

NIH Lifts Ban On Research That Could Make Deadly Viruses Even Worse (NPR)

Scientists could soon resume controversial experiments on germs with the potential to cause pandemics, as government officials have decided to finally lift an unusual three-year moratorium on federal funding for the work. The research involves three viruses — influenza, SARS, and MERS — that could kill millions if they mutated in a way that let the germs spread quickly among people.

November 14, 2017 9:00 am

Lab-grown ‘minibrains’ are revealing what makes humans special (Science)

Ever since Alex Pollen was a boy talking with his neuroscientist father, he wanted to know how evolution made the human brain so special. Our brains are bigger, relative to body size, than other animals’, but it’s not just size that matters. “Elephants and whales have bigger brains,” notes Pollen, now a neuroscientist himself at the University of California, San Francisco. Comparing anatomy or even genomes of humans and other animals reveals little about the genetic and developmental changes that sent our brains down such a different path.

November 10, 2017 9:00 am

Former GSK boss to lead new UK accelerated drug access scheme (Reuters)

Former GlaxoSmithKline boss Andrew Witty is to lead a new British scheme to accelerate access to ground-breaking medicines for conditions such as cancer, dementia and diabetes from April 2018.

October 27, 2017 9:00 am

In Brazil, researchers struggle to fend off deepening budget cuts (Science)

With time and money running out, Brazilian scientists are turning up the pressure on the federal government to avoid a total collapse of the national science and technology funding system before the end of the year.

October 23, 2017 9:00 am

Rand Paul takes a poke at U.S. peer-review panels (Science)

New legislation introduced this week by Senator Rand Paul (R–KY) would fundamentally alter how grant proposals are reviewed at every federal agency by adding public members with no expertise in the research being vetted.

October 13, 2017 9:00 am

Navajo Nation reconsiders ban on genetic research (Nature)

When the Navajo Nation opens its first oncology centre next year in Tuba City, Arizona, clinicians there may be able to offer a service that has been banned on tribal lands for 15 years: analyzing the DNA of Navajo tribe members to guide treatments and study the genetic roots of disease.

October 2, 2017 9:00 am

Chinese scientists fix genetic disorder in cloned human embryos (Nature)

A team in China has taken a new approach to fixing disease genes in human embryos. The researchers created cloned embryos with a genetic mutation for a potentially fatal blood disorder, and then precisely corrected the DNA to show how the condition might be prevented at the earliest stages of development.

September 28, 2017 9:00 am

Whistleblowers at U.S. funded research institutions fear retaliation (Washington Post)

Consider the impact of the Public Health Service’s scandalous “Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male.” Patients were denied needed treatment in the name of science. Launched in 1932, it lasted 40 years and is an example of perverted research with lingering negative consequences. Now comes an investigative report about deterrents in reporting problems with human research. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Inspector General found evidence of a fear of retaliation among whistleblowers in research institutions.

August 30, 2017 9:00 am

Basic studies of how our brains work are now clinical trials, NIH says (Science)

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, has confirmed that the agency’s definition of clinical trials now includes imaging studies of normal brain function that do not test new treatments. The change will impose new requirements that many researchers say don’t make sense and could stifle cognitive neuroscience.

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