Hot Topics: Sports Ethics

Blog Posts (14)

June 4, 2018

“Natural” Talents and Dedication—Meanings and Values in Sport

This post also appears as an editorial in the June 2018 issue of The American Journal of Bioethics.

by Thomas H.

July 25, 2017

Heads Up: Time to Say Goodbye to Football

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Suppose a prescribed drug caused brain damage in 99.1% of people who took it. Would you take the drug?…

December 7, 2016

Is it Time for The NFL to Change Its Policy on Medical Marijuana?

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Seantrel Henderson is a 24-year-old player on The National Football League’s (NFL) Buffalo Bills. Henderson is currently suspended from playing in the NFL because for the second time he has violated the league’s substance abuse policy.…

July 28, 2016

A Sporting Chance: Had We Been Willing, We Could Have Moved or Delayed the Rio Olympics

by Adam R. Houston, JD, MA, LLM

It looks like the Rio Olympics are indeed going to happen; fingers crossed that all the things that could go wrong – from filthy aquatic venues, to collapsing infrastructure, to threats of terrorism – do not.…

May 31, 2016

Response to Zika and the Olympics Letter

The following letter was received by bioethics.net in response to our link to a letter written by professionals urging the Olympics to be postponed this year because of the threat of Zika.…

May 27, 2016

Rio Olympics Later:­ For the Good of Both Public Health and Sport

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

It is imperative that an open, transparent discussion of the risks of holding the Olympics as planned in Brazil occur as soon as possible.  

November 12, 2015

Do we need more paternalism in the NFL to protect players from themselves?

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

This week the St. Louis Rams, a National Football League (NFL) team posted a picture on Twitter of player Wes Welker signing papers, making his departure from the Denver Broncos and his membership in the Rams organization official.…

October 30, 2015

Medical Ethics and School Football

by Steven H. Miles, MD and Shailendra Prasad, MD, MPH

This is a special pre-print posting of an editorial scheduled for the January 2016 issue of the American Journal of Bioethics.

October 16, 2015

Expanding Notions of Discrimination: Genetic Information & Competitive Sports

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

During a periodic training on the university’s harassment policies today, I learned that my institution has added “genetic information” to the list of characteristics against which one cannot be discriminated.…

September 21, 2015

A Crucial Catch: Ethics, the NFL, and Public Health Advocacy

by Macey L. Henderson, J.D.

I enjoy watching my favorite NFL teams and players during football season. As the daughter of a local sports attorney who grew up down the street from the Indianapolis Colts complex, I have always been exposed to programs and events that highlight advocacy that the NFL and their respective team markets provide for communities year after year through high profile efforts.…

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Published Articles (6)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

Performance-Enhancing Drugs, Sport, and the Ideal of Natural Athletic Performance Sigmund Loland

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 18 Issue 1 - Jun 2018

“Natural” Talents and Dedication—Meanings and Values in Sport Thomas H. Murray

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 1 - Jan 2017

Tracking U.S. Professional Athletes: The Ethics of Biometric Technologies Katrina Karkazis & Jennifer R. Fishman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 1 - Jan 2016

Medical Ethics and School Football Steven H. Miles & Shailendra Prasad

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 10 - Oct 2013

Sports Medicine and Ethics Daniela Testoni, Christoph P. Hornik, P. Brian Smith, Daniel K. Benjamin Jr. & Ross E. McKinney Jr.

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 12 Issue 7 - Jul 2012

Out of Bounds? A Critique of the New Policies on Hyperandrogenism in Elite Female Athletes Katrina Karkazis

News (38)

June 26, 2018 4:03 pm

Why FIFA Needs New Thinking About Concussions At World Cup (Forbes)

Morocco winger Nordin Amrabat doesn’t remember much of anything about his team’s defeat against Iran in the 2018 FIFA World Cup. It is not that he would rather forget being on the losing side of the match. It’s that he sustained a concussion during it, which led to some memory loss. Team medical staff later ruled Amrabat out for training and the next match. But, five days later, he was in uniform and playing in a match against Portugal.

June 19, 2018 6:00 am

Soccer Fans, Don’t Root for a Team Based on Genetics (LeapsMag)

23andMe is taking a lot of heat as one of the DNA aggregators whose databases may not be secure from prying third-party eyes. That is a huge issue, but the company is engaging in even more troubling behavior—using genetics to sponsor racism.

May 28, 2018 12:54 pm

Did witnesses fail USC women in care of 'predator' gynecologist? (CNN)

As lawsuits mount against the University of Southern California and a former gynecologist who worked at the school, so do the outrage and demand for answers. Mixed into the conversation is this: If nurses or medical assistants serving as chaperones witnessed Dr. George Tyndall inappropriately touching and treating students, as some have claimed, what’s the point of chaperones?

August 29, 2016 8:00 am

Understanding the Controversy Over Caster Semenya (NY Times)

Caster Semenya of South Africa, heavily favored to win the Olympic women’s 800 meters, ran a quick opening round this week and then breezed past reporters.  Who could blame her?  Perhaps no female athlete has faced such brutal scrutiny by fellow competitors, sports officials and journalists.

June 15, 2016 8:26 am

WHO sees 'very low' risk of further Zika spread due to Olympics (Reuters)

There is a “very low risk” of further international spread of Zika virus as result of the Olympic Games to be held in Brazil, the heart of the current outbreak linked to birth defects, World Health Organization (WHO) experts said on Tuesday.

March 29, 2016 8:42 am

Blood Test for Concussions? Researchers Report Some Progress

New research bolsters evidence that a simple blood test may someday be used to detect concussions. It suggests that a protein linked with head trauma may be present in blood up to a week after injury, which could help diagnose patients who delay seeking treatment.

November 11, 2015 1:45 pm

Flag Football: The Alternative for Concerned Parents

Cliff Ward Jr. is a self-described football nut. The Hebron, Ohio, resident first played football in third grade. His father was a high-school football star. But his 9-year-old son, Ty, is playing something different—flag football, on a local YMCA team.

October 23, 2015 11:20 am

Concussion treatment, diagnosis focus of world sports conference

Medical experts and National Football League (NFL) officials will gather with peers from other top global sports on Saturday in a bid to accelerate how to properly diagnose and treat player concussions.

September 18, 2015 5:38 pm

New: 87 Deceased NFL Players Test Positive for Brain Disease

A total of 87 out of 91 former NFL players have tested positive for the brain disease at the center of the debate over concussions in football, according to new figures from the nation’s largest brain bank focused on the study of traumatic head injury.

August 6, 2015 12:49 pm

Dutee Chand, Female Sprinter With High Testosterone Level, Wins Right to Compete

The final appeals court for global sports further blurred the line separating male and female athletes on Monday, ruling that a common factor in distinguishing the sexes — the level of natural testosterone in an athlete’s body — is insufficient to bar some women from competing against females.

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