Tag: health care

Blog Posts (6)

February 22, 2013

Importing Docs

Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In a National Public Radio story on February 15, economist Dean Baker shared his idea that physicians should be looked at like any other commodity if we want to bring the cost of health care delivery down.

February 21, 2013

Evaluating Ethics Quality: The Time Has Come

Ellen Fox, M.D.

The idea of evaluating ethics quality in health care is not new—but until now, it has proven to be easier said than done.…

February 4, 2013

Physician, Which Patients Will Sue You?

An article in today's American Medical News reviews what types of patients are more lawsuit prone.  And it offers some strategies for addressing legally risky patients.   One risk factor identified is:  "If people beg for a procedure or...
February 3, 2013

Following Orders: Obedience to Authority Figures in Medicine

When your doctor urges you to do something said to benefit your health, do you obey? If not, why not? This blog thread is about how my visitors feel about following orders from those who might be considered as "authority figures in medicine". What foll...
January 18, 2013

Nasty, Brutish & Short

Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes said that in the state of nature, life is “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short.” While Hobbes was describing a world without a government, he might as well have been describing the state of health in the United States in 2013.…

December 21, 2012

Health Care Along the Fiscal Cliff

Craig M. Klugman, Ph.D.

One of the biggest stories in the news as this year ends is that of the U.S.…

Published Articles (26)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

Diagnosis by Documentary: Professional Responsibilities in Informal Encounters Alistair Wardrope & Markus Reuber

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

The Ethics of Organ Donor Registration Policies: Nudges and Respect for Autonomy Douglas MacKay & Alexandra Robinson

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

Autonomy by Default Cass R. Sunstein

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 10 - Oct 2016

War Metaphors in Health Care: What Are They Good For? Kayhan Parsi

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 9 - Sep 2016

The Importance of Fostering Ownership During Medical Training Alex Dubov, Liana Fraenkel & Elizabeth Seng

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 9 - Sep 2016

Owning Medical Professionalism Jon C. Tilburt & Richard R. Sharp

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 1 - Jan 2016

Balancing Legitimate Critical-Care Interests: Setting Defensible Care Limits Through Policy Development Jeffrey Kirby

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 1 - Jan 2016

Legal and Ethical Considerations in Allowing Parental Exemptions From Newborn Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD) Screening Lisa A. Hom, Tomas J. Silber, Kathleen Ennis-Durstine, Mary Anne Hilliard & Gerard R. Martin

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 1 - Jan 2016

Professional Judgment and Justice: Equal Respect for the Professional Judgment of Critical-Care Physicians David Magnus & Norm Rizk

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 2 - Feb 2015

Collectivizing Rescue Obligations in Bioethics Jeremy R. Garrett

View More Articles

News (83)

October 19, 2016 8:00 am

The drug industry’s answer to opioid addiction: More pills (Washington Post)

Cancer patients taking high doses of opioid painkillers are often afflicted by a new discomfort: constipation. Researcher Jonathan Moss thought he could help, but no drug company was interested in his ideas for relieving suffering among the dying.

October 18, 2016 8:00 am

DNA’s new ‘miracle’: How adoptees are using online registries to find their blood relatives (Washington Post)

Last year, Bob Nore, a Vietnam War veteran in Huntsville, Ala., was working on a family tree and wanted to trace his ancestors’ history and origins. So he sent a vial of saliva and $89 to a DNA registry for analysis.

October 17, 2016 8:00 am

Comparison of Physician and Computer Diagnostic Accuracy (JAMA)

The Institute of Medicine recently highlighted that physician diagnostic error is common and information technology may be part of the solution.1 Given advancements in computer science, computers may be able to independently make accurate clinical diagnoses.2 While studies have compared computer vs physician performance for reading electrocardiograms,3 the diagnostic accuracy of computers vs physicians remains unknown. To fill this gap in knowledge, we compared the diagnostic accuracy of physicians with computer algorithms called symptom checkers.

October 14, 2016 4:47 pm

Doctors Significantly Better Than Google, According To New Research (Huffington Post)

Doctors are much better than symptom-checker programs at reaching a correct diagnosis, though the humans are not perfect and might benefit from using algorithms to supplement their skills, a small study suggests.

October 13, 2016 8:00 am

Major Investor Sues Theranos (WSJ)

One of Theranos Inc.’s biggest financial backers has sued the embattled startup and its founder for allegedly lying to attract its nearly $100 million investment, according to a fund document and people familiar with the matter.

October 12, 2016 8:00 am

Excuse Me, Why Are You Wearing Those Surgical Scrubs Outside The Hospital? (WBUR)

I work in Boston’s Longwood Medical Area, one of the densest concentrations of hospitals in the country, and I often have this reaction when I’m out on the street among my work neighbors: “Dude. Ew.”

October 5, 2016 8:00 am

How We Got Here: Treating Addiction In 28 Days (NPR)

Louis Casanova is playing cards with a friend on the back deck of a recovery house in Philadelphia’s northern suburbs.

October 3, 2016 8:00 am

Furor Over Drug Prices Puts Patient Advocacy Groups in Bind (NY Times)

Public anger over the cost of drugs has burned hot for a year, coursing through social media, popping up on the presidential campaign, and erupting in a series of congressional hearings, including one last week over the rising price of the allergy treatment EpiPen.

September 29, 2016 8:00 am

Depression, daily stressors and inflammatory responses to high-fat meals: when stress overrides healthier food choices (Nature)

Depression, stress and diet can all alter inflammation. This double-blind, randomized crossover study addressed the impact of daily stressors and a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) on inflammatory responses to high-fat meals. During two separate 9.5 h admissions, 58 healthy women (38 breast cancer survivors and 20 demographically similar controls), mean age 53.1 years, received either a high saturated fat meal or a high oleic sunflower oil meal. The Daily Inventory of Stressful Events assessed prior day stressors and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV evaluated MDD. As expected, for a woman with no prior day stressors, C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) were higher following the saturated fat meal than the high oleic sunflower oil meal after controlling for pre-meal measures, age, trunk fat and physical activity. But if a woman had prior day stressors, these meal-related differences disappeared—because the stressors heightened CRP, SAA, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 responses to the sunflower oil meal, making it look more like the responses to the saturated fat meal. In addition, women with an MDD history had higher post-meal blood pressure responses than those without a similar history. These data show how recent stressors and an MDD history can reverberate through metabolic alterations, promoting inflammatory and atherogenic responses.

September 28, 2016 10:50 am

World's first baby born from new procedure using DNA of three people (The Guardian)

The world’s first baby to be born from a new procedure that combines the DNA of three people appears to be healthy, according to doctors in the US who oversaw the treatment.

View More News Items