Tag: health care

Blog Posts (6)

February 22, 2013

Importing Docs

Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In a National Public Radio story on February 15, economist Dean Baker shared his idea that physicians should be looked at like any other commodity if we want to bring the cost of health care delivery down.

February 21, 2013

Evaluating Ethics Quality: The Time Has Come

Ellen Fox, M.D.

The idea of evaluating ethics quality in health care is not new—but until now, it has proven to be easier said than done.…

February 4, 2013

Physician, Which Patients Will Sue You?

An article in today's American Medical News reviews what types of patients are more lawsuit prone.  And it offers some strategies for addressing legally risky patients.   One risk factor identified is:  "If people beg for a procedure or...
February 3, 2013

Following Orders: Obedience to Authority Figures in Medicine

When your doctor urges you to do something said to benefit your health, do you obey? If not, why not? This blog thread is about how my visitors feel about following orders from those who might be considered as "authority figures in medicine". What foll...
January 18, 2013

Nasty, Brutish & Short

Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes said that in the state of nature, life is “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short.” While Hobbes was describing a world without a government, he might as well have been describing the state of health in the United States in 2013.…

December 21, 2012

Health Care Along the Fiscal Cliff

Craig M. Klugman, Ph.D.

One of the biggest stories in the news as this year ends is that of the U.S.…

Published Articles (34)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Catholic Social Teaching and the Duty to Vaccinate Paul J. Carson & Anthony T. Flood

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

When are primary care physicians untruthful with patients? A qualitative study Stephanie R. Morain, Lisa I. Iezzoni, Michelle M. Mello, Elyse R. Park, Joshua P. Metlay, Gabrielle Horner & Eric G. Campbell

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 2 - Feb 2017

CPR and Ventricular Assist Devices: The Challenge of Prolonging Life Without Guaranteeing Health David Magnus & Danton Char

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 1 - Jan 2017

Tracking U.S. Professional Athletes: The Ethics of Biometric Technologies Katrina Karkazis & Jennifer R. Fishman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 1 - Jan 2017

A Framework for Unrestricted Prenatal Whole-Genome Sequencing: Respecting and Enhancing the Autonomy of Prospective Parents Stephanie C. Chen & David T. Wasserman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 1 - Jan 2017

Modern Pregnancies and (Im)Perfect Babies Stephanie A. Kraft

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 12 - Dec 2016

A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress Stephen M. Campbell, Connie M. Ulrich & Christine Grady

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 12 - Dec 2016

Moral Distress in Clinical Ethics: Expanding the Concept Alyssa M. Burgart & Katherine E. Kruse

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

Diagnosis by Documentary: Professional Responsibilities in Informal Encounters Alistair Wardrope & Markus Reuber

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

The Ethics of Organ Donor Registration Policies: Nudges and Respect for Autonomy Douglas MacKay & Alexandra Robinson

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News (106)

March 28, 2017 9:00 am

Dying patients want easier access to experimental drugs. Experts say that’s bad medicine (Watertown Daily Times)

DeBartoli walks with difficulty and falls frequently. He’s losing his ability to breathe on his own. Now the 55-year-old from Tracy, Calif., has pinned his hopes on an experimental drug made by Genentech — and a new “right-to-try” law that allows desperate patients to take medications before they’ve been fully vetted by the Food and Drug Administration. The measure’s newest fan is President Donald Trump, who said the FDA’s caution in granting dying patients access to some medications had “always disturbed” him. But for all its populist appeal, the push for right-to-try laws has raised the ire of ethicists, drug safety experts and a former FDA commissioner.

March 16, 2017 9:00 am

Should hospitals — and doctors — apologize for medical mistakes? (Washington Post)

Spurred by concerns about the “deny and defend” model — including its cost, lack of transparency and the perpetuation of errors — programs to circumvent litigation by offering prompt disclosure, apology and compensation for mistakes as an alternative to malpractice suits are becoming more popular.

March 13, 2017 9:00 am

Employees who decline genetic testing could face penalties under proposed bill (Washington Post)

Employers could impose hefty penalties on employees who decline to participate in genetic testing as part of workplace wellness programs if a bill approved by a U.S. House committee this week becomes law.

March 3, 2017 9:00 am

A divided White House still offers little guidance on replacing Obamacare (Washington Post)

A meeting Friday afternoon between President Trump and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, his former rival in the GOP primaries, had no set agenda. But Kasich came armed with one anyway: his hope to blunt drastic changes to the nation’s health-care system envisioned by some conservatives in Washington.

February 13, 2017 9:00 am

Senate confirms Price to lead HHS (Science)

Price now takes the helm of a $1 trillion government department that includes the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Most visibly, he will be charged with overseeing the repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, that Republicans have promised.

January 24, 2017 9:00 am

With executive order, Trump tosses a ‘bomb’ into fragile health insurance markets (Washington Post)

The practical implications of Trump’s action on Friday are harder to decipher. Its language instructs all federal agencies to “waive, defer, grant ­exemptions from or delay” any part of the law that imposes a financial or regulatory burden on those affected by it. That would cover consumers, doctors, hospitals and other providers, as well as insurers and drug companies.

January 13, 2017 9:00 am

Successful Ebola vaccine will be fast-tracked for use (BBC News)

Trials conducted in Guinea, one of the West African countries most affected by an outbreak of Ebola that ended this year, show it offers 100% protection. The vaccine is now being fast-tracked for regulatory approval.

January 9, 2017 9:00 am

Fact-checking Congress’s fetal tissue report (Science)

They interviewed senior physicians from Planned Parenthood, who spoke bluntly about their provision of fetal tissue from legal abortions for medical research

December 23, 2016 9:00 am

Abortion Is Found to Have Little Effect on Women’s Mental Health (The New York Times)

Some states require women seeking abortions to be counseled that they might develop mental health problems. Now a new study, considered to be the most rigorous to look at the question in the United States, undermines that claim.

December 12, 2016 9:00 am

Ohio’s new abortion law is an assault on Roe. Here’s why it won’t work. (Washington Post)

So have Ohio lawmakers made the right bet on what will happen once Trump is in the White House — namely, that a new Supreme Court lineup could overturn Roe?

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